Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaryland Public Service Commission
IN THE NEWS

Maryland Public Service Commission

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
The Maryland Public Service Commission took the first step toward requiring that the state's electricity utilities, including Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., agree to long-term deals to purchase power from a potential new plant in the state. In an order issued Thursday, the state energy regulator said Maryland "continues to face the threat of insufficient new capacity. " There has been little new power generation added to the state since Maryland deregulated its plants a decade ago. According to the order, the state's utilities must issue by Oct. 7 a request for proposals.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will use $52 million from a state grant to bolster Baltimore's energy conservation efforts, including improving education and outreach efforts. The goal of the Baltimore Energy Initiative, announced this week by the mayor's office, is to reduce energy use in the city and promote local investment. Money from the initiative will give some city residents free in-home installation of programmable thermostats, pipe wraps and other energy and water conservation equipment.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2010
Three weeks after a rejection from regulators, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. is trying to revive a plan to roll out technology it says would save customers money by helping them control energy use. BGE said it filed an amended proposal Monday with the Maryland Public Service Commission to install "smart meter" technology, which would let consumers track their electricity use. The utility is still asking to pass startup and upgrade costs on to...
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Ruling that the popular ride-sharing company Uber Technologies is subject to the same regulations imposed on other for-hire vehicle services in the state, state regulators at the same time ordered a revision of those rules to reflect the changing business. The Maryland Public Service Commission ruled Wednesday that Uber is a common carrier like other for-hire car services, a decision that the company opposed, saying it threatened its business model. Yet the commission also ordered its staff to begin crafting new rules for such for-hire companies, saying it recognizes "that many industry changes and technological advances have occurred since these regulations were adopted, including the everyday use of the Internet.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
Maryland energy regulators on Tuesday adopted new regulations designed to improve electric service and reliability in the state. For the past year, the Maryland Public Service Commission has been working to improve new reliability performance standards for each of the state's utilities, including Baltimore Gas and Electric. The standards set rules for tree trimming and customer service performance and require greater accountability by the utilities. Hanah.cho@baltsun.com
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
Marylanders may comment on the merger between Constellation Energy Group and Chicago-based Exelon Corp. at hearings scheduled in Bel Air, Baltimore and Annapolis. The Maryland Public Service Commission will entertain public comment at hearings in the Rotunda of Town Hall of Bel Air on Nov. 29, the Wohlman Assembly Hall of the War Memorial Building in Baltimore on Dec. 1 and the Joint Committee Hearing Room of the Department of Legislative Services Building in Annapolis on Dec. 5. All the hearings are scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. Residents may also send written comments to the commissioners by Dec. 9. Signed comments should be addressed to David J. Collins, Executive Secretary, Maryland Public Service Commission, William Donald Schaefer Tower, 6 St. Paul St., 16th Floor, Baltimore 21202.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
Baltimore Gas and Electric's standard electricity price from June through May 2013 is expected to decrease customer bills by $54 on average for the year-long period, state energy regulators announced Monday. The Maryland Public Service Commission last week accepted bids from BGE and other utilities in the state to supply electricity to residential and commercial customers. On the residential side, utilities purchase electricity from wholesale suppliers under a twice-yearly competitive bidding process, which is overseen by the PSC. BGE residential customers can buy BGE's standard utility service or purchase electricity from third-party suppliers.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
Constellation Energy Group and Exelon Corp. shareholders will have their say on the companies' proposed merger at separate meetings on Nov. 17, according to regulatory documents filed Wednesday. Along with state and federal regulatory approval, investors of both companies need to support the $7.9 billion buyout of Baltimore's Constellation. The vote comes after the Maryland Public Service Commission completes evidentiary hearings on the merger. The review is expected to begin Oct. 31 and conclude by Nov. 10. The PSC will make a decision by Jan. 5. Constellation's special shareholder meeting will take place in New York, while Exelon will hold its vote in Chicago.
NEWS
November 6, 2013
The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company and the Maryland Public Service Commission should not consider the small number of customers who showed up at the first rate-increase hearing as an indication that most people have no opinion on the fact that their energy costs are going up ( "Public a no-show at first BGE rate case hearing," Nov. 4). Rather, they should see it as a sign that many of BGE's customers understand that the company will get its way no matter how many people show up and voice their displeasure.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
State regulators gave the final go-ahead Tuesday to Old Dominion Electric Cooperative to start building a new $675 million power plant in Cecil County. The new Wildcat Point Generation Facility, fueled by natural gas, will help Old Dominion meet the region's growing demand for electricity, CEO Jackson Reasor said. The plant, located next to the cooperative's existing property in Conowingo, is expected to generate 1,000 megawatts of electricity each year, power for roughly 390,000 homes.
NEWS
July 9, 2014
As a senior citizen with very limited income, I'm appalled at the fact that more than likely we will receive a rate increase in our Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. bill ( "BGE asks for fourth rate increase in four years," July 2). The utility has received multiple rate increases over the past few years without a blink from the Maryland Public Service Commission. This commission seems to lean toward the BGE increases and never toward the consumer. I note this as someone who over the years has had to, as the saying goes, "rob Peter to pay Paul," with each allowed increase.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
A U.S. Court of Appeals panel has upheld a decision that Maryland strayed into federal-only territory when it tried to jump start construction of a power plant with subsidies. The Maryland Public Service Commission, concerned about reliability problems if more power plants aren't built, struck a deal for ratepayers to subsidize a natural gas-fired facility in Waldorf any time the wholesale price for its electricity fell below a certain level. The plant was slated to open next year.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Uber Technologies still has a lot to say about the Maryland Public Service Commission's plan to regulate it and other popular rideshare companies as taxi operators — and the regulating agency will hear the company out. Uber, which has said it will leave the state if the changes introduced last month go into effect, notified the commission Tuesday that it plans to appeal the proposal. On Wednesday, the day the changes would have taken effect, the commission granted the company's request to write a 60-page appeal before a decision is made.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
Jonathan Libber has hit the nail squarely upon its head ( "BGE's 'protection money,'" May 19)! I am one of those who chose to opt out of this "gift" from the Maryland Public Service Commission. Allegedly, these "smart meters" will be a boon to the consumer as they will allow us to more judicially use our energy resources. That alone caused me to pause, I don't quite understand how that will work; how will that meter "inform" me any better than the one that I have now as to my use of energy?
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
The rideshare company Uber has launched services in Annapolis, despite having threatened to leave Maryland over potential regulatory changes. The company, which connects users of its smartphone app to drivers looking for fares and handles all associated transactions electronically, already operates in Baltimore. It opened all its services - uberX, UberBlack and UberSUV - to the Annapolis market Wednesday. Shwetha Rajashekara, Uber's general manager for Maryland, said the company has watched interest in its app grow in Annapolis and thought this weekend, with Naval Academy events underway, would be a good time to launch in the state capital.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Libber | May 19, 2014
By now, many people are aware that in order to opt out of a smart meter installation, an upfront fee of $75 - payable in three installations starting July 2014 - and an additional $11 to $17 per month will need to be paid, as ordered by the Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC). While my organization, Maryland Smart Meter Awareness (MSMA), is certainly grateful that the PSC decided to grant a permanent opt out, the fees greatly undermine public choice as only those who can afford to pay will be able to opt out. Nevertheless, many people who for reasons of health, privacy or safety, would strongly prefer to keep their analog meter, will be forced to accept a smart meter due to these fees.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. must get its "smart meter" proposal approved by state regulators before the end of July or it will risk losing $200 million in federal stimulus grants, a company executive said Wednesday. The U.S. Department of Energy can only shift the funds to another program through the end of September, and so they will need the remaining time to evaluate other proposals if this one is not approved, said Mark D. Case, BGE's senior vice president for regulatory affairs.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
Exelon Corp. and Constellation have donated $1.8 million for a new energy exhibit at the Maryland Science Center , the first public display of their charitable commitment to the city and state since the merger between the energy giants closed in March, the companies announced Tuesday. In acquiring Constellation, Exelon promised to maintain the Baltimore company's annual charitable contribution of $7 million in Baltimore and Maryland for at least a decade. The financial commitment was part of a $1 billion package of concessions associated with regulatory approval from the Maryland Public Service Commission.
NEWS
April 20, 2014
For Southern Maryland, the Patuxent River Naval Air Station is an economic engine like no other. It accounts for $6.6 billion in economic activity, including 41,185 jobs, so it's small wonder that elected leaders from that region of the state are extremely protective of it, and that includes House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer. But at what cost? One of the more curious events of the most recent General Assembly session was the passage of legislation that would bar the Maryland Public Service Commission from approving a wind-powered generating facility between now and July 1 of next year within a 56-mile radius of the Navy base.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
Thank you for covering the controversy regarding the proposed Dominion liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at Cove Point ( "Calvert County Cove Point opponents, supporters flood state with comments," April 3). The Cove Point project has far-reaching potential impact on human health and environmental quality in every phase of the process - extraction, transportation, liquefaction, shipping, re-gasification and distribution of the natural gas abroad. We are especially concerned about the impact Dominion's proposal will have on climate and air quality in Maryland.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.