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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Donald A. Krach, former general counsel for the Maryland Port Administration who was an advocate and goodwill ambassador for the port of Baltimore, died May 4 of complications from pancreatic cancer at his Timonium home. He was 80. "Don was a real cheerleader for our port, and he really worked hard with our clients to put more business through here," said James J. White, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration. "He had such a big personality. " "Don was one of those attorneys who came up through the state system, and he was absolutely enthusiastic about the port.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
David A. Wagner, former deputy secretary of the Maryland Department of Transportation who later headed the Maryland Port Administration, died April 7 of cancer at his home in Mandeville, La. The longtime Pasadena resident was 71. "Dave was a good administrator, and he was a detail guy. He was well liked by his employees and those who worked with him," said Helen Delich Bentley, the former congresswoman and chairman of the Federal Maritime Commission....
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2012
Theodore K. "TK" Sanderson Jr., a retired Maryland Port Administration operations specialist who was also an avid outdoorsman, died Oct. 24 from complications of Alzheimer's disease at his White Marsh home overlooking the Bird River. He was 77. "Ted was well-respected in our organization because he was extremely knowledgeable with our operating and engineering groups," said James J. White, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration. "When putting projects together, he'd look at them and make sure that they would work, and he was the guy who merged these two groups in order to make them work," said Mr. White.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
The port of Baltimore handled more automobiles, cargo containers and wood pulp in 2013 than ever before, a record-setting performance despite continuing labor unrest on its public docks. Solidifying its place as the nation's No. 1 port for automobile imports and exports, the Maryland Port Administration said Tuesday that it handled 749,100 cars and trucks in 2013, up from 652,000 in 2012. The increase was due in part to newly inked contracts with auto manufacturers, including a five-year deal with Mazda announced in August.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 9, 2010
Louis J. "Lou" LoBianco, who was a well-known port figure and a highly acclaimed expert in the application of roll-on/roll-off cargo technology to the Port of Baltimore, died Dec. 1 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The former longtime Towson residence — who had lived in Mays Chapel since last year — was 68. "Lou was one of the main reasons why the Port of Baltimore is known today as the top roll-on/roll-off [ro/ro] port in the U.S.," said James J. White, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
David A. Wagner, former deputy secretary of the Maryland Department of Transportation who later headed the Maryland Port Administration, died April 7 of cancer at his home in Mandeville, La. The longtime Pasadena resident was 71. "Dave was a good administrator, and he was a detail guy. He was well liked by his employees and those who worked with him," said Helen Delich Bentley, the former congresswoman and chairman of the Federal Maritime Commission....
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
A strike by hundreds of longshoremen who work the port of Baltimore's docks idled one of the region's big economic engines. Launched early Wednesday morning, the strike shut down all of the port's public marine terminals, and its effects rippled out from the docks where ship crews waited for their vessels to be unloaded, to the truckers who haul cargo and cars from the port, to the warehouses that unload consumer goods. It started after members of the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 voted Tuesday night to reject a local contract with the Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore, which represent the port's employers of longshoremen.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
The port of Baltimore's continuing labor dispute, which boiled over in a three-day dockworkers strike in October before a three-month "cooling-off" period, now simmers with uncertainty. Labor peace in the port seems precarious. A contract covering the handling of vehicles and other local matters has expired, and workers voted down a new contract. The union says it won't strike and management says it won't lock out the dockworkers. The only certainty is that the port has lost work, and some of it might never return, port officials said.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
Just after sunrise, a caravan of nearly 1,000 new cars begins streaming down the ramp of a massive cargo ship, a procession that won't end until evening. Mercedes-Benz and BMW models go one way. Land Rovers and other models go another. Some days, the routine at the port of Baltimore runs in reverse, with thousands of U.S.-made cars being loaded for overseas destinations. All that traffic means 2011 will turn out to have been a record year for the port of Baltimore's public auto terminals.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
The port of Baltimore handled more automobiles, cargo containers and wood pulp in 2013 than ever before, a record-setting performance despite continuing labor unrest on its public docks. Solidifying its place as the nation's No. 1 port for automobile imports and exports, the Maryland Port Administration said Tuesday that it handled 749,100 cars and trucks in 2013, up from 652,000 in 2012. The increase was due in part to newly inked contracts with auto manufacturers, including a five-year deal with Mazda announced in August.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice has identified and begun targeting a broad conspiracy to fix prices on automobile shipments in and out of Baltimore and other U.S. ports, with a Chilean company recently pleading guilty to violating federal antitrust laws in the scheme. Justice officials reached a felony plea agreement with Valparaiso, Chile-based Compania Sud Americana de Vapores (CSAV), according to documents filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. They called it the first charge to land in a continuing antitrust investigation into companies colluding to push up shipping prices.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
The port of Baltimore's continuing labor dispute, which boiled over in a three-day dockworkers strike in October before a three-month "cooling-off" period, now simmers with uncertainty. Labor peace in the port seems precarious. A contract covering the handling of vehicles and other local matters has expired, and workers voted down a new contract. The union says it won't strike and management says it won't lock out the dockworkers. The only certainty is that the port has lost work, and some of it might never return, port officials said.
NEWS
January 31, 2014
It seems strange to celebrate the return of a ship that hasn't left yet, but that's what the recent announcement that the Carnival Pride will be sailing out of Baltimore beginning in March of 2015 amounts to. Last summer, Carnival Cruise Lines announced the ship would begin sailing out of Tampa, Florida beginning this November, and now, like a reliable snow bird, it's planning a return to Northern climes after just a few months in the Sunshine state....
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Shippers already have begun diverting cargo from the port of Baltimore because of uncertainty about the ongoing labor contract standoff with the largest dockworkers union. The port is losing shipments despite assurances from labor and management officials that there won't be another strike or a lockout when a 90-day cooling-off period expires Friday. But there was no sign of a deal late Thursday, with labor representatives pushing for negotiations to continue and management saying their final offer is already on the table.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Members of a local longshoremen union that went on strike in October, crippling the port of Baltimore for three days, will meet Monday to discuss a new contract offer from the port's employers. The deadline for a new deal between the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 and the Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore, which represents the employers, is Jan. 17. That's when a "cooling-off" period ordered by an arbitrator to stop the October strike and restart port operations comes to an end. The outcome of the Local 333 meeting, where a vote on the proposed contract could take place, will have huge implications for the port - which has worked to protect its reputation as a dependable cargo handler after the last work stoppage angered customers.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
The Maryland Port Administration is urging state officials to approve its sale of a 346,0000-square-foot pier in the Canton Industrial Area. The Clinton Street Marine Terminal, which has seen little use for decades, sits across the Inner Harbor from Fort McHenry in the 1800 and 1900 blocks of S. Clinton Street, and has an appraised value between $2.5 million and $3.1 million, according to remarks on the intended sale before the Board of Public Works....
NEWS
January 31, 2014
It seems strange to celebrate the return of a ship that hasn't left yet, but that's what the recent announcement that the Carnival Pride will be sailing out of Baltimore beginning in March of 2015 amounts to. Last summer, Carnival Cruise Lines announced the ship would begin sailing out of Tampa, Florida beginning this November, and now, like a reliable snow bird, it's planning a return to Northern climes after just a few months in the Sunshine state....
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Officials in Maryland don't know how feasible it is to turn dredged muck from the bottom of Baltimore's shipping channels into a commercially viable construction material — but they are looking to find out. The Maryland Department of Transportation and the Maryland Port Administration recently requested information from a variety of private companies on best practices in turning the sludgy dredged material at its Cox Creek Dredged Material Containment...
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