Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaryland Officials
IN THE NEWS

Maryland Officials

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2011
Maryland officials are working behind the scenes to lure the FBI's headquarters to the state from its longtime home base in downtown Washington as the agency seeks an updated building to carry out its expanded counterterrorism and cyber crime missions. If successful, the effort would land nearly 12,000 jobs and a 2.1 million square-foot office complex in Prince George's County, making it one of the largest economic development coups in years. Its impact would rival the immense footprint in the state of the Social Security Administration, which has its headquarters in Woodlawn.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
A former high-ranking Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs official pleaded guilty to extortion Monday in federal court after falsely claiming about $1.4 million in government benefits over a 16-year period. David Clark, a 67-year-old Hydes resident, admitted fabricating documents and claims to secure federal benefits and state tax waivers for himself and at least 17 other veterans. He acknowledged making up records in his role as the deputy chief of claims for the state agency, including fake doctors' letters saying that claimants suffered from diabetes and documents listing false tours of Vietnam and awards such as Purple Hearts from 1995 until his retirement in 2011.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Not long ago state officials in Maryland faced a technology roadblock that anyone who works at a private company would find quaint: There was no easy way to blast an email to the entire workforce. For an administration led by an early BlackBerry addict, the inability to quickly send government-wide emails in an emergency - or even to invite state employees to the executive mansion for the annual open house - was an odd holdover from an era before camera phones and touch screens. Now, roughly 54,000 state employees are switching to a cloud-based email and scheduling system provided by tech giant Google - making Maryland the largest state in the nation to rely on the ubiquitous search engine firm for email, calendars and document sharing.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
- Three University of Maryland students crossed U.S. 1 this weekend, hours after a fatal hit-and-run on the same stretch of road. The students said they know jaywalking on the major thoroughfare is dangerous - three people have been struck and killed by drivers there in the past six months - but they said they've become accustomed to drivers yielding to them on campus. "Because on campus the cars have to stop for you, we all are so used to it," said Elizabeth Steidl. "So we just walk wherever we want.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
State financial regulators and the attorney general issued a warning Friday about bitcoin and other virtual currencies, saying buyers - and sellers - should be careful. "For now, there is little to no regulation and no safety net for consumers or investors who lose their money dabbling in virtual currency such as Bitcoin," Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said in a statement. Mark Kaufman, Maryland's commissioner of financial regulation, said in that statement that the state doesn't regulate virtual currencies but is examining issues related to them.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
The percentage of Maryland ex-offenders likely to return to prison within three years of release has fallen by double digits since 2000, state prison officials reported Monday. Secretary Gary D. Maynard, the top official at the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, credited the prison system's improved educational and job skills training programs, as well as stronger partnerships with state agencies that provide medical and mental health services to inmates and upon their release.
BUSINESS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Maryland has lost its bid to be a Federal Aviation Administration test site for drones, but officials still expect the state to be involved in federal research into how the unmanned aircraft may safely be flown in U.S. airspace. Virginia was one of six states chosen Monday by the FAA. Maryland, Virginia and New Jersey signed an agreement this year to collaborate on drone research. As a result, Maryland officials said, personnel and facilities in all three states will play a role in the FAA testing.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Maryland officials Friday ordered Starion Energy, a Connecticut-based company licensed to sell electricity in parts of Maryland, to pay $350,000 for multiple violations of state law, including more than 100 instances in which it enrolled, or re-enrolled customers without consent. The penalty is the Public Service Commission's most severe yet against a retail energy supplier. The commission imposed a $60,000 fine on Viridian in 2012 and a $100,000 fine on North American Power & Gas in 2011.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
The prospect of filling every seat at M&T Bank Stadium for Saturday's matchup between Maryland and West Virginia seemed promising when the game was first booked a little more than two years ago. Both the Terps and Mountaineers were coming off bowl games and had made coaching changes to energize their respective fan bases. Although the game might not sell out - 55,000 tickets have been sold as of Thursday morning, according to Maryland deputy athletic director Nathan Pine - the makeup of the crowd in terms of the allegiance to the respective teams could be noticeable.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1996
In Maryland, Haroon R. Ansari once told whopping lies on a resume that state officials never bothered to check and was named to a $62,000-a-year job as head of Crownsville Hospital Center.The would-be psychologist was declared a fraud, resigned in disgrace and pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor last April, promising never to lie on a job application again.A week later, he sent his resume to officials with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan. Authorities said he told more whopping lies and got hired for over $80,000 a year, with his employer once again failing to conduct a background investigation.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
The National Federation of the Blind has sued Maryland election officials, charging that their April decision not to approve a system that would make it easier for disabled people to cast absentee ballots privately violates federal law. The Baltimore-based federation filed suit this week asking the U.S. District Court to order the State Board of Elections to provide that technology in time for the June 24 primary election. "The right to a secret ballot that can be filled out privately and independently is just as important to people with disabilities as it is for other voters," said federation spokesman Chris Danielson.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
State financial regulators and the attorney general issued a warning Friday about bitcoin and other virtual currencies, saying buyers - and sellers - should be careful. "For now, there is little to no regulation and no safety net for consumers or investors who lose their money dabbling in virtual currency such as Bitcoin," Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said in a statement. Mark Kaufman, Maryland's commissioner of financial regulation, said in that statement that the state doesn't regulate virtual currencies but is examining issues related to them.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
Millions of dollars in winning Mega Millions tickets remain unclaimed while a $1 million ticket in Saturday's Powerball drawing was sold in Glen Burnie, a state Lottery spokeswoman said. While no one matched all numbers needed to hit the Powerball, a winning $1 million ticket was sold at JJ's Tavern in the 1000 block of 1st St. in Glen Burnie, Lottery officials announced on Sunday. Four other $1 million tickets were also purchased elsewhere in the country. The winning numbers were 13, 28, 31, 55 and 58. The Powerball was 15. Maryland lottery officials indicated on Twitter on Sunday that the state's winner had not yet come forward.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Maryland officials Friday ordered Starion Energy, a Connecticut-based company licensed to sell electricity in parts of Maryland, to pay $350,000 for multiple violations of state law, including more than 100 instances in which it enrolled, or re-enrolled customers without consent. The penalty is the Public Service Commission's most severe yet against a retail energy supplier. The commission imposed a $60,000 fine on Viridian in 2012 and a $100,000 fine on North American Power & Gas in 2011.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Officials at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore are investigating the death of a middle-aged female chimpanzee that was found lifeless in an enclosure early Wednesday morning, several hours after being anesthetized for a scheduled physical exam. Whether the anesthesia was a factor in the animal's death will be reviewed as part of a necropsy, or animal autopsy, zoo officials said. The 21-year-old primate, named Renee, was among the first group of chimpanzees to inhabit the zoo's Chimpanzee Forest following its opening in 1995.
HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
Critics said Saturday that the latest problem to hit Maryland's online health exchange - an incorrect help-line number that directed hundreds of callers to a Seattle-based pottery business - was another symptom of the poorly operating website. "You can't make this stuff up, and I guess if it wasn't so serious, it could be funny," said Senate Minority Leader David R. Brinkley, a Frederick County Republican. The website mistakenly listed a 1-800 number that sent some Marylanders attempting to pick a health insurance provider to Seattle Pottery Supply instead of Maryland's call center.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | October 24, 2011
Can you challenge the logic behind Gov. Martin O'Malley's decision to give $9.5 million in taxpayer money to Bechtel Corp.? No governor wants to lose 1,250 jobs to a neighboring state. Especially if he's a Democrat and the neighbor, Virginia, has a Republican governor bragging about low taxes. Especially if he recently lost another economic development contest when Northrop Grumman chose Fairfax County, Va., instead of Montgomery County, Md., for its headquarters. This time O'Malley won!
NEWS
December 12, 1995
A story about delinquent child support payments in the Nov. 15 issue of The Sun misstated the amount of payments collected by Maryland officials. The state collected $250 million in payments.The Sun regrets the errors.
BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Not long ago state officials in Maryland faced a technology roadblock that anyone who works at a private company would find quaint: There was no easy way to blast an email to the entire workforce. For an administration led by an early BlackBerry addict, the inability to quickly send government-wide emails in an emergency - or even to invite state employees to the executive mansion for the annual open house - was an odd holdover from an era before camera phones and touch screens. Now, roughly 54,000 state employees are switching to a cloud-based email and scheduling system provided by tech giant Google - making Maryland the largest state in the nation to rely on the ubiquitous search engine firm for email, calendars and document sharing.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.