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NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Sandy Banisky and Patricia Meisol and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writers | February 25, 1993
The University of Maryland Medical System awarded a contract to manage its new hospital pharmacy to a company owned in part by Roger C. Lipitz, the chairman of the medical system's board.Morton I. Rapoport, the system's president and chief executive officer, said yesterday that the contract was competitively bid and that rules governing disclosure of potential conflicts by directors were followed.Nevertheless, the matter did raise concerns among some board members and was reviewed by the full board last month as required by its disclosure rules, he said.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical System has completed its merger with Upper Chesapeake Health in Harford County, four years after the medical institutions agreed to affiliate. Upper Chesapeake includes the 185-bed Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air and the 89-bed Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace. The health system is now named University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health under the merger. Since partnering, UMMS has brought more specialty services to Harford County's fast-growing populations, which now stands at 248,000 residents.
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NEWS
July 1, 2000
JOHNS HOPKINS may be Baltimore's internationally acclaimed hospital, but its cross-town rival, University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS), is becoming the hospital with the best statewide network. This week's acquisition of North Arundel Hospital continues that trend. The 329-bed North Arundel, in Glen Burnie, is a thriving general hospital that serves a growing middle-income suburb south of the city. But North Arundel lacks the medical firepower University can deliver as its partner.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2013
After a surgical scandal involving a cardiologist brought St. Joseph Medical Center to its knees, the medical staff left behind struggled to move forward. Patients and doctors fled in droves after the scandal broke in 2009. Negative headlines beat at their morale. And many remaining employees believed the distant owner of the once-well-regarded community hospital in Towson was unresponsive, leaving them feeling abandoned. "It was difficult to face the reality that someone I trusted very much had failed us," said Dr. Gail Cunningham, a 23-year veteran who headed the emergency department and is now vice president of medical affairs.
NEWS
By John Reid | November 14, 2013
A patient-care technician for the University of Maryland Medical System must update his skills regularly to keep his job, but he hasn't seen an update in his salary. Another UMMS technician must work at least two jobs to have any money left after paying basic living expenses. And a third caregiver, who has worked for the medical system for several years, can barely afford care for his family at the very hospital where he cares for others. For UMMS caregivers, is this situation fair, decent or moral?
NEWS
August 31, 2008
The troubles at the University of Maryland Medical System started long before one-third of the board, including its chairman, resigned a week and a half ago. And it predates the dispute over how to replace outgoing Chief Executive Officer Edmond F. Notebaert, who announced his retirement in July. Tensions at the medical system have been building for years, and critics who now lambaste Gov. Martin O'Malley for intervening in the matter have it exactly wrong. The problem is not that the governor took recent action but that he did not step in much earlier when it was clear that UMMS leadership had become dysfunctional.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1996
The call comes in the dead of night, often on a weekend. Somewhere in Maryland, a seriously ill person is awakened by a bedside beeper. The messenger brings salvation, in this world at least. A heart has arrived. Your lung is in. We have a kidney for you. Are you ready?It's the University of Maryland Medical Center calling. In four years, Maryland has built one of the busiest transplant centers in the country. In 1995 alone, transplants at Maryland rose 69 percent. The hospital now does more transplants than Johns Hopkins, the historic local leader.
NEWS
April 3, 2005
Bonsack joins board at Shock Trauma Center Dr. Rose Mary Hatem Bonsack has been elected to Maryland Shock Trauma Center's board of visitors at the University of Maryland Medical System. Bonsack, a lifelong resident of Harford County, is past president of the Maryland Academy of Family Physicians and the Harford County Medical Society. She is also a former delegate to the General Assembly from District 34.
NEWS
By FRED SCHULTE and FRED SCHULTE,SUN REPORTER | December 20, 2005
Lawyers who sue Maryland's elite hospitals for alleged medical mistakes often don't target the physicians involved, a practice that expedites such cases but can shield doctors from government regulators and the public. The practice involves doctors employed by Johns Hopkins Medicine or the University of Maryland Medical System. When doctors are not defendants, it is easier to reach agreement, Hopkins and lawyers say. In the process, the identities of doctors associated with malpractice claims can be obscured, an investigation by The Sun has found.
NEWS
September 6, 2006
An item in "The Week That Was" column in Sunday's Maryland section might have left an erroneous impression regarding the governance of charter schools. Charter schools are publicly funded but operate independently under contracts with local school boards or regulating agencies. An article in Saturday's editions about the retirement of Dr. Donald E. Wilson as dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine quoted Dr. Morton I. Rapoport, who was chief executive officer of the University of Maryland Medical System in 1991 when Wilson was hired.
NEWS
By John Reid | November 14, 2013
A patient-care technician for the University of Maryland Medical System must update his skills regularly to keep his job, but he hasn't seen an update in his salary. Another UMMS technician must work at least two jobs to have any money left after paying basic living expenses. And a third caregiver, who has worked for the medical system for several years, can barely afford care for his family at the very hospital where he cares for others. For UMMS caregivers, is this situation fair, decent or moral?
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical System has entered into a management agreement with the 37-bed Fort Washington Medical Center with provisions that would allow it to eventually take ownership of the facility in southern Prince George's County. Under the agreement, the current CEO and chief financial officer of Fort Washington Medical Center, which is owned by Nexus Health, would retain their positions but become employees of UMMS. The boards of both health systems would have to approve any merger or acquisitions.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital is changing its name to better reflect its ties to the University of Maryland Medical System. The hospital will be known as the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute effective this month. The new name is also meant to reflect its focus on innovation and research. The 144-bed hospital is the largest inpatient rehabilitation hospital and provider of rehabilitation services in the state. Patients come to the hospital after recovering from strokes, traumatic injury and other illnesses.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
St. Joseph Medical Center officially became part of the University of Maryland Medical System this past weekend, and it's difficult not to see this development as a victory for all involved. The hospital had been rocked by a malpractice scandal — and hundreds of lawsuits — involving unnecessary surgeries conducted by its cardiology department, and the new ownership would seem to give the institution and its employees a fresh start. For several years, St. Joseph has been operating under a cloud left behind by Dr. Mark Midei and the stent procedures of questionable merit.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
The University of Maryland Medical System expects to complete its acquisition of St. Joseph Medical Center Friday nearly a year after the Towson hospital sought a buyer as it looked to bounce back from the fallout of accusations that one of its doctors performing unnecessary cardiac procedures. Signs will be erected Saturday at the new entity, to be called The University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The 2,000-employee hospital suffered revenue, patient and staff losses after its star cardiologist, Dr. Mark Midei, was accused of placing stents in the arteries of hundreds of patients who may not have needed them.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
When the owners of troubled St. Joseph Medical Center put the Towson hospital up for sale a year ago, the University of Maryland Medical System didn't hesitate to put in a bid. Medical violations by its star cardiologist had left St. Joseph in financial disarray and struggling to hang on to patients, doctors and its reputation. It faced millions of dollars in lawsuits and the prospect of a further decline. But the UMMS board and its top executives saw opportunity in the 148-year-old Catholic medical institution started by the Sisters of St. Francis.
NEWS
December 20, 1996
University of Maryland Medicine and the Anne Arundel Health System Inc. have formed a partnership that will staff the University of Maryland Medical System's new center in Shipley's Choice with physicians from the Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis.Pediatricians, obstetricians, gynecologists and services such as cardiology, plastic surgery and women's health programs will be housed in the university's 30,000-square-foot, two-story building at Benfield Boulevard and Veterans Highway in Millersville.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
The University Specialty Hospital is expected to move its inpatient chronic care services to other hospitals in the University of Maryland Medical System in July, hospital and state officials said Tuesday. Hospital officials said they would move the traumatic brain injury program to Kernan Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Hospital and ventilator-dependent patients to Maryland General Hospital. The specialty hospital will provide only outpatient programs. The specialty hospital staff will be able to apply for open positions within the system, though it's unclear how many of the 350 employees will find jobs, according to state and hospital officials.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
The University of Maryland Medical System said Wednesday that it expects to complete its acquisition of St. Joseph Medical Center on Dec. 1, nearly a year after the Towson hospital sought a buyer as it looked to recover from the fallout of one of its doctors performing unnecessary cardiac procedures. The new entity, to be called The University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, will take over operations of the 2,000-employee hospital pending final federal regulatory approval.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2012
A federal court has dismissed a case against a rehabilitation hospital owned by the University of Maryland Medical System that was accused of diagnosing patients with a rare malnutrition-related disorder to collect bigger Medicare and Medicaid payments. The federal government filed a $8.1 million lawsuit in U.S. District Court against Kernan Hospital last year, saying the West Baltimore facility manipulated its computer system to show that patients suffered from kwashiorkor, a disease most typically found in impoverished regions.
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