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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | May 24, 2013
Update : Carver said this afternoon that 50 total employees would lose their jobs, including 10 to 15 doctors and midwives. They could get jobs at other UMMS facilities, including other positions at Maryland General.  The obstetrics unit at Maryland General will close June 30th displacing 10 to 15 doctors and midwives. The news was first reported in the Baltimore Business Journal. The University of Maryland Medical System, which owns Maryland General, made the decision to stop the services because of a declining number of deliveries at the hospital, said spokeswoman Mary Lynn Carver.
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NEWS
May 13, 2013
All of us mourn the loss of Richard E. Hug, who had a profound impact on the civic and political life of our community (May 7). I thought it might be useful to single out the incredible impact that Dick had on the formative years of the University of Maryland Medical System beginning in 1984 and continuing to this day. In our privatization process beginning in 1984, Dick was a key member of the first board of directors and, equally important to...
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Johns Hopkins Hospital charged $13,667 on average to treat one admission of a Medicare patient with diabetes in 2011, while a couple of miles away Mercy Medical Center billed an average of $8,425. The University of Maryland Medical Center charged $9,045 on average to treat a kidney and urinary tract infection, while a short distance away Bon Secours Hospital's charges averaged $11,922. Data released by the federal government Wednesday show that what hospitals charge Medicare to treat patients varies widely.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
Rosalie A. "Rosie" Fonner, a registered nurse who had worked for several decades in the mother-baby unit at University of Maryland Medical Center, where she relished her role as an advocate, died Feb. 3 of cancer at her Halethorpe home. She was 62. "Rosie was an incredible advocate for moms who were disadvantaged by addiction or their social situation. She would encourage them that they could be good moms," said the Rev. David Harness, a Church of God pastor who is one of the medical center's chaplains.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Dr. Alice Heisler Hissey, medical director of the University of Maryland Medical Center's Behavioral Pediatrics Clinic who also was a consultant to city public schools, died Oct. 18 of pancreatic cancer at her Columbia home. The former Catonsville and Laurel resident was 75. "When I arrived here six years ago, Alice befriended me and took the time and effort to come by my office and talk about the glorious history of this department," said Dr. Steve J. Czinn, professor and chair of the department of pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine where he is also physician-in-chief.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
The federal Food and Drug Administration identified 89 medical facilities in Maryland that bought drugs from the Massachusetts manufacturer being investigated for a national fungal meningitis outbreak. The facilities are among more than 3,000 in numerous states that the FDA said received drugs from the New England Compounding Center as evidence of widespread sanitary issues at the company continues to come to light. The list of facilities in Maryland covers a large swath of the medical community.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
An average of twice a day, a patient at the University of Maryland Medical Center has a heart attack, dangerous allergic reaction or other emergency that requires supplies from a crash cart. The carts are the wheeled emergency stations that contain equipment including trays of life-saving drugs. And at Maryland, the trays are now also filled with radio-frequency identification tags that ensure all the medications are there and have not expired. "We rely on these [carts] day in and day out," said Dr. John W. Blenko, an anesthesiologist at Maryland's Shock Trauma Center and an associate professor in Maryland's School of Medicine.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Maryland has hosted 1,775 clinical trials for new medicines targeting six major chronic diseases since 1999, including 369 that are still in the early stages of recruiting patients, according to a study by two pharmaceutical industry groups released Friday. The report assessed the economic impact of clinical trials in the state, noting that the industry helped support 81,000 jobs, total employee salaries of $1.9 billion and $71 million in Maryland taxes as of 2008. More than half of the continuing clinical trials in the state are occurring in Baltimore, at the University of Maryland Medical Center and Johns Hopkins University, the report found.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
There is a food truck gathering today 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The event is being held in conjunction with the opening day of the University Farmers' Market. Expected to attend are Silver Platter, Kooper's Chowhound, Iced Gems Creations, Souper Freaks, Gypsy Queen, Chicken 'n' Waffle and Miss Shirley's. The trucks will circle near the plaza in front of 22 South Greene St. The University Farmers' Market is held every Tuesday from 10:00 a.m.-2:30 p.m., from May to November in University Park Plaza, across from the Medical Center's main entrance.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
For the first time in the six years since Victoria Chakwin was diagnosed with a deadly lung disease, the gown she wears won't be hospital issue. The 18-year-old from Martinsburg, W.Va., will go to her senior prom Saturday night in a red-and-black number she found on the Internet. A rite of passage for most teens, the event is more momentous for Victoria - who's known as Tori - because people diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis generally live only three to five years. That she is headed to her prom demonstrates not only the possibilities of modern medicine but the will of the teen and her mother, according to Tori's doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center, who in late January replaced her scarred, dysfunctional lungs with a donor set. "We can do a lot with technology, if we're not afraid to use it," said Dr. Aldo T. Iacono, medical director of Maryland's lung transplant program, one of the few in the country that will transplant scarce organs into someone so sick.
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