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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
Donald J. Artes, a Sinai Hospital pediatric respiratory therapist who was known as a skilled clinician and administrator, died May 24 of complications from an infection at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Fullerton resident was 54. "He was a great man for sure. He was an inspiration to everyone at Sinai, and he always had the right attitude and sense of humor, no matter what the circumstances as he faced Crohn's and kidney disease," said David R. Madden, manager of the respiratory department at Sinai Hospital, whom Mr. Artes had hired at the University of Maryland Medical Center in 1996.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Fire investigators found cigarettes and a lighter in the hospital bed of a man who died in a fire at University of Maryland Medical Center, but the cause of the fire has not been conclusively determined, a report of the incident shows. The report provides the first information released in the Nov. 8 death of William Turner, 53, at the downtown Baltimore hospital. An autopsy earlier determined that Turner died of smoke inhalation and burns that caused complications to his underlying hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
NEWS
By John Rivera and Michael James and John Rivera and Michael James,Staff Writers | November 9, 1993
A prominent Baltimore surgeon has been convicted of fondling a patient during an examination.But Dr. E. George Elias -- a professor and director of surgical oncology at the University of Maryland Medical Center and president of the Maryland Chapter of the American College of Surgeons -- strongly declared his innocence last night."
HEALTH
By Rita Rubin, Kaiser Health News | February 7, 2014
An intensive care unit nurse in a small-town hospital on the Eastern Shore suspected that a patient had necrotizing fasciitis, the so-called "flesh-eating" disease. The condition is rare. Even experienced intensive-care doctors seldom see it, and, since it was nighttime, no such physician was in the ICU. Pinning down the diagnosis was critical - and in this case Berlin's Atlantic General Hospital had backup. A critical-care doctor 125 miles away was monitoring the patient's health via voice, video and high-speed data lines constantly streaming information about vital signs, medications, test results and X-rays, a telemedicine service known as University of Maryland eCare.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
Samuel Riggs IV, a cattle farmer, philanthropist and former Northwest Baltimore utility construction firm official, died Monday at University of Maryland Medical Center of injuries suffered in an automobile accident. He was 82. On Sept. 19, the truck Mr. Riggs was driving on Route 108 near his Olney farm hit a stopped car and then struck two trees. In 1998, Mr. Riggs gave $2.5 million to a new University of Maryland, College Park alumni center, which is slated to be constructed next year and to be named for him. Montgomery General Hospital's critical care unit is also named in his honor.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN | May 21, 2008
Twenty Maryland hospitals, including Johns Hopkins Bayview and the University of Maryland Medical Center, are featured in a print ad campaign by the federal government, which wants consumers to look at the hospitals' quality ratings. The ads, paid for by the national Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, are appearing today in 58 major daily newspapers, including The Sun. They cover 2,500 hospitals and promote Hospital Compare ( www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov), a government Web site that offers information designed to help choose a hospital.
NEWS
April 6, 2009
* Dr. Rajabrata Sarkar, an expert in treating blood vessel disorders and a nationally known researcher in blood vessel growth and development, has joined the University of Maryland School of Medicine as professor of surgery and head of the division of vascular surgery. He also becomes chief of vascular surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Sarkar is a former associate professor of surgery and a vascular surgeon at the University of California, San Francisco. He received his medical degree and a doctorate in physiology from the University of Michigan Medical School.
NEWS
March 13, 1991
George Smith, 71, one of the longest surviving kidney-dialysis patients at the University of Maryland Medical Center, died March 2 at the hospital after a long illness.Funeral services for Mr. Smith were held March 7 at the Cornerstone Church of Christ, 4200 Park Heights Ave.Mr. Smith, who lived in West Baltimore, was employed by the Barton Cement Co. for 40 years until his retirement in 1975.He had been a kidney-dialysis patient at University for 15 years, and was remembered by staff members there for his courage, patience and willingness to assist other dialysis patients.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 1, 2004
A 21-year-old Carney woman was charged yesterday with attempted murder and first-degree assault after her boyfriend was hit twice by her car Friday night, Baltimore County police said. About 10 p.m., Taryn Wright of the first block of Lerner Court and Eugene Walizer, 33, were arguing in her car on Ridgely Oak Road in Parkville, where he lives, said Lt. Kevin Green. Police said Walizer got out of her Toyota and Wright struck him with her vehicle. She then made a U-turn and ran over Walizer, police said.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
An adult male suffering multiple gunshot wounds walked into the emergency room of University of Maryland Medical Center on Monday afternoon and told police that he was shot at a nearby cookout by an unknown man who opened fire. The man, whose identity was not disclosed, entered the emergency room at 12:44 p.m. and told police that he was shot multiple times at Fayette and Gilmor streets, Det. Angela Carter-Watson said. The man's injuries are believed to be non life-threatening, she said.
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