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NEWS
March 4, 2004
Dean Dougherty Keagle, a former medical technician who had moved to Baltimore a decade ago for medial care, died of complications from diabetes Feb. 26 at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Towson resident was 42. Born in Marion County, Ind., and raised in Colorado, he served in the Navy from 1980 to 1981. He then took medical technology courses and became a phlebotomist, a technician who draws blood, in Tucson, Ariz. He was the recipient of several kidney and pancreas transplants at University of Maryland Medical Center.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
At the new $1.1 billion Johns Hopkins Hospital there will be Xboxes and a basketball court for kids, sleeper-sofas for families, single rooms for all patients, an improved dining menu and extensive soundproofing. It's part of an effort to make the hospital experience more patient-focused, Hopkins officials said Thursday on the first tour given to the news media since construction began five years ago on the 1.6 million-square-foot building, which will replace aging facilities on the East Baltimore medical campus.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
If Gov. Martin O'Malley wants to make some real money when his second term ends, he might want to apply for work at the University System of Maryland. The great majority of the 1,346 workers who match or beat the governor's $150,000 annual salary, including the 15 highest earners, work for the university system, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis of state employee salaries for 2010. Most of the exceptions are doctors with the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, a few judges and a scattering of others.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Richard P. Gangler, a paper salesman and sports coach, died of head and neck cancer Dec. 17 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Towson resident was 61. Born in Baltimore and raised on Chesterfield Avenue, he attended Shrine of the Little Flower School and was a 1968 graduate of Archbishop Curley High School, where he played soccer, basketball and lacrosse. He belonged to the Lancers Boys Club and was a volunteer at Camp Skylemar in Maine. He earned a political science degree at Loyola University of Maryland, where he also played lacrosse, soccer and basketball.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Staff | July 27, 2003
Johns Hopkins Hospital recently threw a party in the basement atrium of the Ross Building on its East Baltimore campus -- and Daniel Grossman was 45 minutes late. Nobody took offense. He has earned the right to be behind schedule. The party was a premature-baby reunion that attracted more than 125 "graduates" of the hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Thirteen-year-old Daniel left NICU (pronounced nick-you) with high honors: He is Hopkins' smallest-ever preemie, having weighed in at a feathery 360 grams, just three quarters of a pound.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
Julie Stitt begged her husband for years to let her donate her kidney as he spent nearly a decade in dialysis, through two failed transplants. Last year, he relented. It was a difficult decision. Her husband, Chuck, didn't want her to make the sacrifice. And she knew her father, Richard Kern, would need a transplant eventually as nearly five decades of diabetes wore on his kidneys. That time came about a month after her decision. "It was a hard place," Julie Stitt said. "I wanted to give to my husband, but I knew my father would need one. " She volunteered to donate to a stranger, getting her husband on a donation exchange waiting list.
NEWS
April 6, 2009
* Dr. Rajabrata Sarkar, an expert in treating blood vessel disorders and a nationally known researcher in blood vessel growth and development, has joined the University of Maryland School of Medicine as professor of surgery and head of the division of vascular surgery. He also becomes chief of vascular surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Sarkar is a former associate professor of surgery and a vascular surgeon at the University of California, San Francisco. He received his medical degree and a doctorate in physiology from the University of Michigan Medical School.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
An adult male suffering multiple gunshot wounds walked into the emergency room of University of Maryland Medical Center on Monday afternoon and told police that he was shot at a nearby cookout by an unknown man who opened fire. The man, whose identity was not disclosed, entered the emergency room at 12:44 p.m. and told police that he was shot multiple times at Fayette and Gilmor streets, Det. Angela Carter-Watson said. The man's injuries are believed to be non life-threatening, she said.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN | May 21, 2008
Twenty Maryland hospitals, including Johns Hopkins Bayview and the University of Maryland Medical Center, are featured in a print ad campaign by the federal government, which wants consumers to look at the hospitals' quality ratings. The ads, paid for by the national Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, are appearing today in 58 major daily newspapers, including The Sun. They cover 2,500 hospitals and promote Hospital Compare ( www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov), a government Web site that offers information designed to help choose a hospital.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Baltimore's fire department is investigating the circumstances of a fire at the University of Maryland Medical Center that left a patient dead. Mary Lynn Carver, a spokeswoman for the hospital, said the fire late Friday night was contained to one patient's room and quickly extinguished. No one else was injured, she said. The circumstances of the fire and cause of death are both under investigation, fire department spokesman Ian Brennan said. Fire investigators refused to speculate about the cause, he said.
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