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Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Five thousand workers at the University of Maryland Medical Center now have labor protections under the National Labor Relations Board thanks to a bill signed by Gov. Martin O'Malley Monday. Local labor union 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East had pushed for legislation that would allow the workers to unionize. Attorney General Doug Gansler issued an opinion on the matter last year saying the Maryland General Assembly had the authority to enact legislation subjecting UMMC to Maryland's collective bargaining law. In Maryland, private hospitals fall under the National Labor Relations Board and public hospitals fall under the Maryland Labor Relations Act. The University of Maryland Medical Center was governed by neither.
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NEWS
July 24, 2013
A recent Sun Article by Andrea Walker discussed the University of Maryland Medical Center's intention to rename Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital ("Kernan hospital changing name," July 8). James Lawrence Kernan was a Baltimore businessman who owned theaters and hotels. Mr. Kernan moved into one of his hotels and converted his mansion and estate to a hospital for children and later to include adults who required rehabilitative care. During his lifetime, Mr. Kernan watched his dream come true and the hospital become a success.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
The union representing thousands of Maryland health care workers is renewing a push to apply state labor protections and collective bargaining laws to employees at the University of Maryland Medical Center, a move that hospital officials say is not needed to allow unionizing there. A November opinion from the state attorney general's office spurred 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East to argue that state officials should oversee the hospital's labor relations, which includes not just unionizing but responding to any grievances from nonunion employees.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Fire investigators found cigarettes and a lighter in the hospital bed of a man who died in a fire at University of Maryland Medical Center, but the cause of the fire has not been conclusively determined, a report of the incident shows. The report provides the first information released in the Nov. 8 death of William Turner, 53, at the downtown Baltimore hospital. An autopsy earlier determined that Turner died of smoke inhalation and burns that caused complications to his underlying hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Johns Hopkins Hospital charged $13,667 on average to treat one admission of a Medicare patient with diabetes in 2011, while a couple of miles away Mercy Medical Center billed an average of $8,425. The University of Maryland Medical Center charged $9,045 on average to treat a kidney and urinary tract infection, while a short distance away Bon Secours Hospital's charges averaged $11,922. Data released by the federal government Wednesday show that what hospitals charge Medicare to treat patients varies widely.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1998
Augusta DuVal Hennighausen, a centenarian who volunteered at many Baltimore civic organizations and functions until she was well into her 80s, died Saturday at Corsica Hills Nursing Home in Centreville. She was 102.A lively, spry woman, Mrs. Hennighausen immersed herself in volunteer activities for the past 50 years -- driving seniors and the disabled to medical appointments, delivering meals to the homebound and serving as a "pink lady" at University of Maryland Medical Center."She just enjoyed doing these things," said her daughter, Augusta H. Hunt of Grason.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Ruth E. Eger, the former executive director of the Joseph Richey Hospice who lectured widely on death and dying, died June 9 of pneumonia at Saint Agnes Hospital. She had just celebrated her 80th birthday. "Ruth was the most spirited and positive-thinking person. No problem was so big that we couldn't grow and learn from it, and she found that in everybody," said Catherine M. Frome, who was named clinical director of the Joseph Richey Hospice in April. "She turned Joseph Richey Hospice around and made its finances viable in order to care for the underserved in Baltimore," said Ms. Frome.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2000
Twelve years ago, Congressman Floyd D. Spence of South Carolina overcame emphysema when he received two healthy lungs from an 18-year-old boy who died in a motorcycle accident. Today, he owes his life to someone else: his 46-year-old son, David, a fitness instructor and kick boxer who yielded one of his kidneys Friday in a living donation at the University of Maryland Medical Center. "I feel very privileged and blessed that it was I who was chosen to do this thing," David Spence said yesterday as he stood beside his beaming father.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
Samuel Riggs IV, a cattle farmer, philanthropist and former Northwest Baltimore utility construction firm official, died Monday at University of Maryland Medical Center of injuries suffered in an automobile accident. He was 82. On Sept. 19, the truck Mr. Riggs was driving on Route 108 near his Olney farm hit a stopped car and then struck two trees. In 1998, Mr. Riggs gave $2.5 million to a new University of Maryland, College Park alumni center, which is slated to be constructed next year and to be named for him. Montgomery General Hospital's critical care unit is also named in his honor.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN | May 21, 2008
Twenty Maryland hospitals, including Johns Hopkins Bayview and the University of Maryland Medical Center, are featured in a print ad campaign by the federal government, which wants consumers to look at the hospitals' quality ratings. The ads, paid for by the national Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, are appearing today in 58 major daily newspapers, including The Sun. They cover 2,500 hospitals and promote Hospital Compare ( www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov), a government Web site that offers information designed to help choose a hospital.
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