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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Johns Hopkins Hospital charged $13,667 on average to treat one admission of a Medicare patient with diabetes in 2011, while a couple of miles away Mercy Medical Center billed an average of $8,425. The University of Maryland Medical Center charged $9,045 on average to treat a kidney and urinary tract infection, while a short distance away Bon Secours Hospital's charges averaged $11,922. Data released by the federal government Wednesday show that what hospitals charge Medicare to treat patients varies widely.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Dr. Howard F. Raskin, former chief of the gastroenterology department at Maryland General Hospital, died Sept. 17 at Duke University Hospital during surgery to replace a heart valve. The longtime Owings Mills resident was 87. "Howard was one of the smartest men I ever knew at the University of Maryland Hospital. He was top-drawer and had the manner of a gentleman," said Dr. Jason Max Masters, who retired in 1990 from the hospital, where he had been director of medical technology.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | September 11, 1994
Dr. Cyrus Lloyd Blanchard, whose pioneering techniques in ear surgery offered hope to the deaf and sufferers from tinnitus, died Tuesday of cancer at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Catonsville resident was 73.Dr. Blanchard's surgery, known as a stapedectomy, involves the removal of the stapes, a bone in the middle ear that becomes immobile because of otosclerosis, a medical condition."Thousands have benefited from this procedure," said Dr. William Gray, an otolaryngologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center who studied under Dr. Blanchard.
NEWS
September 23, 2004
John L. Murdock Sr., who worked for half a century in medical testing as a hospital employee and owner of a laboratory, died of pneumonia Sept. 16 at Northwest Hospital Center. The Forest Park resident was 80. Born and raised in Baltimore, he was a 1943 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. He earned a bachelor's degree from what is now Morgan State University after Army service during World War II and the Korean War. He attained the rank of sergeant. He worked for what is now the University of Maryland Medical Center as a lab technician and became supervisor of its histology lab. About 30 years ago, he became a supervisor in the histology department at what is now St. Agnes HealthCare, where he retired about 20 years ago. He also taught science at what is now Coppin State University, and at his death owned and operated Associates in Tissue Technology, a Baltimore National Pike medical lab. He had a financial interest in a liquor store at North and Braddish avenues.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | November 4, 2006
A scandal over the employee referral bonus program at University of Maryland Medical Center widened yesterday when federal prosecutors announced that three more employees had been charged with pocketing funds. A federal grand jury indicted Paula Anderson, 39; her mother, Carlet Clemons, 59; and Michael Venable, 31, all of Baltimore, in a $1.5 million scheme to defraud the university. The indictment was returned yesterday and unsealed today upon the arrest of the defendants. All three appeared in U.S. District Court yesterday.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN | May 21, 2008
Twenty Maryland hospitals, including Johns Hopkins Bayview and the University of Maryland Medical Center, are featured in a print ad campaign by the federal government, which wants consumers to look at the hospitals' quality ratings. The ads, paid for by the national Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, are appearing today in 58 major daily newspapers, including The Sun. They cover 2,500 hospitals and promote Hospital Compare ( www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov), a government Web site that offers information designed to help choose a hospital.
NEWS
April 6, 2009
* Dr. Rajabrata Sarkar, an expert in treating blood vessel disorders and a nationally known researcher in blood vessel growth and development, has joined the University of Maryland School of Medicine as professor of surgery and head of the division of vascular surgery. He also becomes chief of vascular surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Sarkar is a former associate professor of surgery and a vascular surgeon at the University of California, San Francisco. He received his medical degree and a doctorate in physiology from the University of Michigan Medical School.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 1, 2004
A 21-year-old Carney woman was charged yesterday with attempted murder and first-degree assault after her boyfriend was hit twice by her car Friday night, Baltimore County police said. About 10 p.m., Taryn Wright of the first block of Lerner Court and Eugene Walizer, 33, were arguing in her car on Ridgely Oak Road in Parkville, where he lives, said Lt. Kevin Green. Police said Walizer got out of her Toyota and Wright struck him with her vehicle. She then made a U-turn and ran over Walizer, police said.
NEWS
March 13, 1991
George Smith, 71, one of the longest surviving kidney-dialysis patients at the University of Maryland Medical Center, died March 2 at the hospital after a long illness.Funeral services for Mr. Smith were held March 7 at the Cornerstone Church of Christ, 4200 Park Heights Ave.Mr. Smith, who lived in West Baltimore, was employed by the Barton Cement Co. for 40 years until his retirement in 1975.He had been a kidney-dialysis patient at University for 15 years, and was remembered by staff members there for his courage, patience and willingness to assist other dialysis patients.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Baltimore's fire department is investigating the circumstances of a fire at the University of Maryland Medical Center that left a patient dead. Mary Lynn Carver, a spokeswoman for the hospital, said the fire late Friday night was contained to one patient's room and quickly extinguished. No one else was injured, she said. The circumstances of the fire and cause of death are both under investigation, fire department spokesman Ian Brennan said. Fire investigators refused to speculate about the cause, he said.
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