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NEWS
By John Rivera and Michael James and John Rivera and Michael James,Staff Writers | November 9, 1993
A prominent Baltimore surgeon has been convicted of fondling a patient during an examination.But Dr. E. George Elias -- a professor and director of surgical oncology at the University of Maryland Medical Center and president of the Maryland Chapter of the American College of Surgeons -- strongly declared his innocence last night."
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HEALTH
By Rita Rubin, Kaiser Health News | February 7, 2014
An intensive care unit nurse in a small-town hospital on the Eastern Shore suspected that a patient had necrotizing fasciitis, the so-called "flesh-eating" disease. The condition is rare. Even experienced intensive-care doctors seldom see it, and, since it was nighttime, no such physician was in the ICU. Pinning down the diagnosis was critical - and in this case Berlin's Atlantic General Hospital had backup. A critical-care doctor 125 miles away was monitoring the patient's health via voice, video and high-speed data lines constantly streaming information about vital signs, medications, test results and X-rays, a telemedicine service known as University of Maryland eCare.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Baltimore's fire department is investigating the circumstances of a fire at the University of Maryland Medical Center that left a patient dead. Mary Lynn Carver, a spokeswoman for the hospital, said the fire late Friday night was contained to one patient's room and quickly extinguished. No one else was injured, she said. The circumstances of the fire and cause of death are both under investigation, fire department spokesman Ian Brennan said. Fire investigators refused to speculate about the cause, he said.
NEWS
March 4, 2004
Dean Dougherty Keagle, a former medical technician who had moved to Baltimore a decade ago for medial care, died of complications from diabetes Feb. 26 at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Towson resident was 42. Born in Marion County, Ind., and raised in Colorado, he served in the Navy from 1980 to 1981. He then took medical technology courses and became a phlebotomist, a technician who draws blood, in Tucson, Ariz. He was the recipient of several kidney and pancreas transplants at University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
October 16, 2007
The Rev. Eileen C. House, assistant rector at St. James' Episcopal Parish in Lothian, died of Wegener's disease Oct. 9 at University of Maryland Medical Center. She was 51 and lived on the parish grounds. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Parkville area, she was home-schooled and attended Parkville High School. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Loyola College. She was a respiratory therapist at the University of Maryland Medical Center before earning a master's degree from Yale Divinity School.
NEWS
April 14, 1994
Two women were flown to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center and one man was taken to the emergency room at the University of Maryland Medical Center after a collision early yesterday at Route 170 and Amtrak Way in Hanover, county police said.Alyssa Brooks, 26, of the 4500 block of Springdale Ave., Baltimore, and Cionita Placer, 34, of the 600 block of Stafford Hill Road, Glen Burnie, were treated at Shock Trauma. Mrs. Placer's husband, 35-year-old Perlipo Placer, was treated at the emergency room of the University of Maryland Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | February 14, 1999
It was time for most of Baltimore's heart doctors to follow their own advice and get a cardio workout, albeit on the dance floor at the 1999 Heart Ball.Some 200 area cardiologists and cardiac surgeons, and 400 other guests, not only raised their heart rates, but $180,000 for the American Heart Association at the annual heartfelt fest, held at the Baltimore Convention Center.Jay M. Weinstein, AHA's Baltimore Division board chairman, presented the evening's two honorees, who joined the fight against heart disease from different sides of the battlefield.
NEWS
July 24, 2013
A recent Sun Article by Andrea Walker discussed the University of Maryland Medical Center's intention to rename Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital ("Kernan hospital changing name," July 8). James Lawrence Kernan was a Baltimore businessman who owned theaters and hotels. Mr. Kernan moved into one of his hotels and converted his mansion and estate to a hospital for children and later to include adults who required rehabilitative care. During his lifetime, Mr. Kernan watched his dream come true and the hospital become a success.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | May 24, 2013
Update : Carver said this afternoon that 50 total employees would lose their jobs, including 10 to 15 doctors and midwives. They could get jobs at other UMMS facilities, including other positions at Maryland General.  The obstetrics unit at Maryland General will close June 30th displacing 10 to 15 doctors and midwives. The news was first reported in the Baltimore Business Journal. The University of Maryland Medical System, which owns Maryland General, made the decision to stop the services because of a declining number of deliveries at the hospital, said spokeswoman Mary Lynn Carver.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN | January 26, 2006
A Baltimore jury awarded $3.5 million yesterday to the family of a man who is alleged to have died from a bacterial infection at University of Maryland Medical Center, according to the plaintiff's lawyers. Angel Mendoza, 26, was admitted to the hospital Sept. 22, 2002, with a blood disorder, his family's lawyer said. He died a week later from another infection contracted in the hospital and never discovered by doctors, according to attorney Peter Rubin. The trial lasted eight days, and the jury deliberated two hours before reaching a verdict yesterday.
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