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BUSINESS
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Five thousand workers at the University of Maryland Medical Center now have labor protections under the National Labor Relations Board thanks to a bill signed by Gov. Martin O'Malley Monday. Local labor union 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East had pushed for legislation that would allow the workers to unionize. Attorney General Doug Gansler issued an opinion on the matter last year saying the Maryland General Assembly had the authority to enact legislation subjecting UMMC to Maryland's collective bargaining law. In Maryland, private hospitals fall under the National Labor Relations Board and public hospitals fall under the Maryland Labor Relations Act. The University of Maryland Medical Center was governed by neither.
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NEWS
March 4, 2004
Dean Dougherty Keagle, a former medical technician who had moved to Baltimore a decade ago for medial care, died of complications from diabetes Feb. 26 at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Towson resident was 42. Born in Marion County, Ind., and raised in Colorado, he served in the Navy from 1980 to 1981. He then took medical technology courses and became a phlebotomist, a technician who draws blood, in Tucson, Ariz. He was the recipient of several kidney and pancreas transplants at University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
April 14, 1994
Two women were flown to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center and one man was taken to the emergency room at the University of Maryland Medical Center after a collision early yesterday at Route 170 and Amtrak Way in Hanover, county police said.Alyssa Brooks, 26, of the 4500 block of Springdale Ave., Baltimore, and Cionita Placer, 34, of the 600 block of Stafford Hill Road, Glen Burnie, were treated at Shock Trauma. Mrs. Placer's husband, 35-year-old Perlipo Placer, was treated at the emergency room of the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
October 16, 2007
The Rev. Eileen C. House, assistant rector at St. James' Episcopal Parish in Lothian, died of Wegener's disease Oct. 9 at University of Maryland Medical Center. She was 51 and lived on the parish grounds. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Parkville area, she was home-schooled and attended Parkville High School. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Loyola College. She was a respiratory therapist at the University of Maryland Medical Center before earning a master's degree from Yale Divinity School.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | May 24, 2013
Update : Carver said this afternoon that 50 total employees would lose their jobs, including 10 to 15 doctors and midwives. They could get jobs at other UMMS facilities, including other positions at Maryland General.  The obstetrics unit at Maryland General will close June 30th displacing 10 to 15 doctors and midwives. The news was first reported in the Baltimore Business Journal. The University of Maryland Medical System, which owns Maryland General, made the decision to stop the services because of a declining number of deliveries at the hospital, said spokeswoman Mary Lynn Carver.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Dr. Howard F. Raskin, former chief of the gastroenterology department at Maryland General Hospital, died Sept. 17 at Duke University Hospital during surgery to replace a heart valve. The longtime Owings Mills resident was 87. "Howard was one of the smartest men I ever knew at the University of Maryland Hospital. He was top-drawer and had the manner of a gentleman," said Dr. Jason Max Masters, who retired in 1990 from the hospital, where he had been director of medical technology.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | September 11, 1994
Dr. Cyrus Lloyd Blanchard, whose pioneering techniques in ear surgery offered hope to the deaf and sufferers from tinnitus, died Tuesday of cancer at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Catonsville resident was 73.Dr. Blanchard's surgery, known as a stapedectomy, involves the removal of the stapes, a bone in the middle ear that becomes immobile because of otosclerosis, a medical condition."Thousands have benefited from this procedure," said Dr. William Gray, an otolaryngologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center who studied under Dr. Blanchard.
NEWS
April 6, 2009
* Dr. Rajabrata Sarkar, an expert in treating blood vessel disorders and a nationally known researcher in blood vessel growth and development, has joined the University of Maryland School of Medicine as professor of surgery and head of the division of vascular surgery. He also becomes chief of vascular surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Sarkar is a former associate professor of surgery and a vascular surgeon at the University of California, San Francisco. He received his medical degree and a doctorate in physiology from the University of Michigan Medical School.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
An adult male suffering multiple gunshot wounds walked into the emergency room of University of Maryland Medical Center on Monday afternoon and told police that he was shot at a nearby cookout by an unknown man who opened fire. The man, whose identity was not disclosed, entered the emergency room at 12:44 p.m. and told police that he was shot multiple times at Fayette and Gilmor streets, Det. Angela Carter-Watson said. The man's injuries are believed to be non life-threatening, she said.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN | May 21, 2008
Twenty Maryland hospitals, including Johns Hopkins Bayview and the University of Maryland Medical Center, are featured in a print ad campaign by the federal government, which wants consumers to look at the hospitals' quality ratings. The ads, paid for by the national Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, are appearing today in 58 major daily newspapers, including The Sun. They cover 2,500 hospitals and promote Hospital Compare ( www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov), a government Web site that offers information designed to help choose a hospital.
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