Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaryland Medical Center
IN THE NEWS

Maryland Medical Center

NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2013
Jennifer Carlson, a 37-year-old woman described by Baltimore police as "suicidal and homicidal," walked away from a psychiatric ward at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore Friday. She was later found by police safe and unharmed. tricia.bishop@baltsun.com twitter.com/triciabishop
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Rita Rubin, Kaiser Health News | February 7, 2014
An intensive care unit nurse in a small-town hospital on the Eastern Shore suspected that a patient had necrotizing fasciitis, the so-called "flesh-eating" disease. The condition is rare. Even experienced intensive-care doctors seldom see it, and, since it was nighttime, no such physician was in the ICU. Pinning down the diagnosis was critical - and in this case Berlin's Atlantic General Hospital had backup. A critical-care doctor 125 miles away was monitoring the patient's health via voice, video and high-speed data lines constantly streaming information about vital signs, medications, test results and X-rays, a telemedicine service known as University of Maryland eCare.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
Samuel Riggs IV, a cattle farmer, philanthropist and former Northwest Baltimore utility construction firm official, died Monday at University of Maryland Medical Center of injuries suffered in an automobile accident. He was 82. On Sept. 19, the truck Mr. Riggs was driving on Route 108 near his Olney farm hit a stopped car and then struck two trees. In 1998, Mr. Riggs gave $2.5 million to a new University of Maryland, College Park alumni center, which is slated to be constructed next year and to be named for him. Montgomery General Hospital's critical care unit is also named in his honor.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | October 28, 1991
Dr. R Adams Cowley, the brilliant, combative surgeon who pioneered the shock-trauma medicine that has saved thousands severely injured emergency patients here and across the nation, died yesterday at his home in Baltimore. He was 74.A spokesman at the Shock-Trauma Unit in Baltimore said coronary disease was the apparent cause of Dr. Cowley's death. Funeral arrangements were incomplete.Dr. Cowley, already a superior cardiac surgeon involved in early open-heart operations, was one of the first to recognize that emergency medicine should be a separate medical discipline, demanding doctors, nurses and paramedics trained in the needs of people with multiple, massive injuries.
NEWS
November 23, 1994
BALTIMORE -- An 18-month-old boy, one of seven children overcome by dangerous carbon monoxide fumes Monday night, remained hospitalized yesterday at the University of Maryland Medical Center, fire officials said.The condition of the toddler, Davon Harper, could not be learned. Nine other victims were released from hospitals yesterday. Officials said the occupants of a rowhouse in the 2400 block of E. Biddle St. were overcome by the odorless fumes about 10:30 p.m. when a furnace malfunctioned.
NEWS
August 2, 2000
The death Monday of a man who was severely beaten more than three weeks ago on a Southwest Baltimore street has been ruled a homicide, police said yesterday. James Lyons, 54, whose last known address was the 400 block of Edsdale Road, was in the 4600 block of Old Frederick Road about 4:30 a.m. July 8 when he was attacked by several men. He died about 3 p.m. Monday at University of Maryland Medical Center. Anyone with information is urged to call 410-396-2100.
NEWS
June 15, 2003
A 16-year-old Pasadena boy was hospitalized last week after he was accidentally shot by his older brother, Anne Arundel police said. Police said the shooting took place Wednesday afternoon in the 7800 block of Mayford Road. Authorities said the older brother, 23, said the two were trying to move a firearm from a table to the gun cabinet when it accidentally discharged. The teen was struck in the arm. Although his injuries were not considered life-threatening, he was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, and treated at University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
February 11, 1995
Lynn Carol Cockerham, 44, a Jarrettsville resident, died Tuesday of complications of kidney disease at the University of Maryland Medical Center.Services for the Baltimore native were to be held at 1 p.m. today at New Life Church of God, 1249 North Bend Road, Jarrettsville.She is survived by two sons, William Marcus Cockerham of Jarrettsville and Wesley Michael Cockerham of Airville, Pa.; a brother, Stephen Wayne Cockerham of Upperco; two sisters, Linda Berkowitz of Mechanicsville, Pa., and Anne E. Berrell of Bel Air; and a granddaughter.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 5, 2004
The 8-week-old son of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr. and first lady Kendel Ehrlich returned home yesterday morning after undergoing surgery for an obstruction between the stomach and small intestine at the University of Maryland Medical Center, the governor's office said. Joshua Ehrlich underwent a second procedure Monday night to ensure the success of the first procedure to correct a condition known as hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, the office said. The initial operation was Sunday. Joshua is expected to make a full recovery.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | January 17, 2007
At the University of Maryland Medical Center, employees in the competitive world of health care reaped rewards when they recruited new colleagues. Workers could pocket up to $5,000 each time they found an applicant who later became a medical center employee. However, Paula Anderson turned the hunt for new employees into a lucrative crime. Anderson, who worked in the medical center's human resources department, admitted yesterday in federal court in Baltimore that she turned the incentive system on its head.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.