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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical Center will send layoff notices to employees at the end of the month as it looks to cut costs in the wake of federal budget cuts and what it and other state hospitals have called inadequate rate increases. Jeffrey Rivest, president and CEO of the Baltimore hospital, sent an email to managers Tuesday that said individual letters regarding layoffs would be given out June 25, 26 and 27. The number of people who will lose their jobs still is being finalized, said spokeswoman Mary Lynn Carver said.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore on Friday named Joel Tinsley-Hall as its new executive director, effective immediately. The decision comes amid tensions between the community and the center, and after a community-led interview of Tinsley-Hall last month became contentious at times. Tinsley-Hall, 39, is an 8-year Army veteran and a former supervisor of the University of Maryland's Harbor City Unlimited residential rehabilitation program for patients with mental illness.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
An average of twice a day, a patient at the University of Maryland Medical Center has a heart attack, dangerous allergic reaction or other emergency that requires supplies from a crash cart. The carts are the wheeled emergency stations that contain equipment including trays of life-saving drugs. And at Maryland, the trays are now also filled with radio-frequency identification tags that ensure all the medications are there and have not expired. "We rely on these [carts] day in and day out," said Dr. John W. Blenko, an anesthesiologist at Maryland's Shock Trauma Center and an associate professor in Maryland's School of Medicine.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
The pent-up frustration in Baltimore's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community with the center founded decades ago to serve their needs was on full display Tuesday night, when several local activists grilled a candidate for the center's open executive director position. Joel Tinsley-Hall, 39, a black Baltimore native and Army veteran with a husband and children, an active church life and a history working with mentally ill adults and youth, at times found himself on the defensive during the more than one-hour interview session on the second floor of the Waxter Center in Mount Vernon, where the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore, or GLCCB, is located.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
Nine Maryland hospitals, including the University of Maryland Medical Center, have been handed financial penalties this year from the state's rate-setting commission because they had costly or higher-than-average rates of preventable patient complications. The effort by the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission, which sets the rates that hospitals can charge, is designed to improve patient safety and lower health care costs by linking hospital performance with their payments.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
Karen P. Vojtko, who was nurse manager of the cardiac-care and progressive-care units at the University of Maryland Medical Center, where her career spanned more than three decades, died Wednesday of cancer at her Abingdon home. She was 56. "Karen had passion, warmth and was caring. She saw her role at the medical center as looking after people," said David G. Hunt, director of nursing and patient care services for cardiac care and radiology at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
For the first time in the six years since Victoria Chakwin was diagnosed with a deadly lung disease, the gown she wears won't be hospital issue. The 18-year-old from Martinsburg, W.Va., will go to her senior prom Saturday night in a red-and-black number she found on the Internet. A rite of passage for most teens, the event is more momentous for Victoria - who's known as Tori - because people diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis generally live only three to five years. That she is headed to her prom demonstrates not only the possibilities of modern medicine but the will of the teen and her mother, according to Tori's doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center, who in late January replaced her scarred, dysfunctional lungs with a donor set. "We can do a lot with technology, if we're not afraid to use it," said Dr. Aldo T. Iacono, medical director of Maryland's lung transplant program, one of the few in the country that will transplant scarce organs into someone so sick.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Sun Architecture Critic | November 8, 2003
For years, a chief symbol of the University of Maryland Medical Center has been the domed image of Davidge Hall, the anatomical theater where students once gathered in secret to learn about the human body by dissecting cadavers unearthed from nearby graveyards. Now the teaching hospital has a new symbol that features a less clandestine meeting place - the soaring, skylit atrium of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building. Part of a nine-level, $218 million addition that will be dedicated Saturday, the glass-covered atrium is the new heart and soul of the west side medical center, which admits 31,000 patients a year and trains more than half of the physicians practicing in Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | November 9, 2003
For years, a chief symbol of the University of Maryland Medical Center has been the domed image of Davidge Hall, the anatomical theater where students once gathered in secret to learn about the human body by dissecting cadavers unearthed from nearby graveyards. Now the teaching hospital has a new symbol that features a less clandestine meeting place -- the soaring, skylit atrium of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building. Part of a nine-level, $218-million addition that will be dedicated Saturday, the glass-covered atrium is the new heart and soul of the west side medical center, which admits 31,000 patients a year and trains more than half of the physicians practicing in Maryland.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | March 8, 1993
Former Baltimore Colts quarterback John Unitas, who underwent coronary bypass surgery early Saturday, remained in serious condition yesterday at University of Maryland Medical Center, a hospital spokeswoman said.Unitas, 59, had breathing difficulty and chest pains after knee surgery Thursday at Kernan Hospital and was taken to University of Maryland Medical Center, where he was operated on for an arterial blockage. It is normal for patients who have undergone heart surgery to be listed as serious shortly after the operation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Dr. Paul A. Mullan, a retired Baltimore pediatrician who had also served in the Air Force Medical Corps, died Sunday at Stella Maris Hospice of complications from a stroke. He was 84. The son of George Vaughn Mullan, who was supervisor of maintenance for the New York subway system, and Mary Calaghy Mullan, an administrative assistant, Paul Aloysius Mullan, was born in New York City and raised in Brooklyn. He was a graduate of St. Francis deSales School in Geneva, N.Y., and graduated in 1948 from Seton Hall Preparatory School in South Orange, N.J. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1952 in chemistry, he enrolled at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, and after a year entered the University of Maryland School of Medicine, where he earned a medical degree in 1957.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will split her time Tuesday between working from home and at City Hall as her health continues to improve after a brief hospitalization over the weekend, her spokesman said. Spokesman Kevin Harris said Rawlings-Blake would resume her public appearances Wednesday. She has been in regular contact with her senior staff and Cabinet and is making decisions, he said. "The mayor is continuing to work a modified schedule that is not as heavy on public appearances and speaking engagements," Harris said in a statement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Dr. Robert R. Hahn, former emergency room chief at what is now the University of Maryland Shore Medical Center in Easton, died Aug. 7 of coronary artery disease at William Hill Manor in Easton. He was 93. "Dr. Hahn was a wonderful, wonderful man. He was a great patient advocate and was an advocate for the nurses. He was an advocate for education. And he was always very open with the staff," said Dottie Waters, who worked with Dr. Hahn for more than 20 years and is now a relief nurse at the University of Maryland Shore Medical Center.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 11, 2014
Maryland added its 10 th hospital-based domestic violence program at the University of Maryland Medical Center , officials announced Monday. The Bridge Project at UMMC was launched with a $50,000 grant from the Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention and a $20,000 grant from Verizon . The program will serve patients at both the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center and the UMMC Emergency Department. Victims of domestic violence will be able to get crisis counseling, safety planning, referrals and follow-up services around the clock.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Ruth E. Eger, the former executive director of the Joseph Richey Hospice who lectured widely on death and dying, died June 9 of pneumonia at Saint Agnes Hospital. She had just celebrated her 80th birthday. "Ruth was the most spirited and positive-thinking person. No problem was so big that we couldn't grow and learn from it, and she found that in everybody," said Catherine M. Frome, who was named clinical director of the Joseph Richey Hospice in April. "She turned Joseph Richey Hospice around and made its finances viable in order to care for the underserved in Baltimore," said Ms. Frome.
BUSINESS
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Five thousand workers at the University of Maryland Medical Center now have labor protections under the National Labor Relations Board thanks to a bill signed by Gov. Martin O'Malley Monday. Local labor union 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East had pushed for legislation that would allow the workers to unionize. Attorney General Doug Gansler issued an opinion on the matter last year saying the Maryland General Assembly had the authority to enact legislation subjecting UMMC to Maryland's collective bargaining law. In Maryland, private hospitals fall under the National Labor Relations Board and public hospitals fall under the Maryland Labor Relations Act. The University of Maryland Medical Center was governed by neither.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
Ronald W. Price, the Anne Arundel County teacher convicted in 1993 of sexually abusing three female students, died of lung cancer yesterday at the University of Maryland Medical Center, a day after his release from a 21-year prison term.An Anne Arundel County circuit judge ordered that Price, 53, be released from the Maryland House of Correction Friday so that he could die in a hospice rather than in an infirmary at the prison."Members of his family were with him when he passed away," said Ellen Beth Levitt, a spokeswoman for the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
Constance K. Rand, a homemaker and volunteer, died April 21 of respiratory failure at Union Memorial Hospital. The longtime Roland Park resident was 97. The daughter of Herbert Waldemar Koehn and Dallas Huntington Rogers Koehn, Constance Huntington Koehn was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and raised in Haverford, Pa., and Rosemont, Pa. She attended Haverford Friends School and Miss Wright's School in Bryn Mawr, Pa., before moving with her family in...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Edythe E. Evans, a retired University of Maryland dental clinic instructor who was active in her church, died April 9 of Alzheimer's disease at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. She was 83. The daughter of Ernest Evans, a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad worker, and Arinthia Evans, a homemaker, Edythe Ernestine Evans was born in Baltimore and raised on Fulton Avenue. After graduating in 1948 from Frederick Douglass High School, Ms. Evans enrolled in a surgical technician program at what is now the University of Maryland Medical Center.
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