Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaryland Manufacturers
IN THE NEWS

Maryland Manufacturers

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 17, 1996
Taxes, the cost of technical improvements and rising medical expenses are among the biggest challenges of Maryland manufacturers, according to a quarterly survey published by Snyder, Kamerow & Associates, a Bethesda accounting firm.The cost of technical improvements scored 3.9 on a scale of business obstacles in which an obstacle with a value of "1" was considered to have no impact and "5" to have serious impact.The scores were based on a survey of Maryland manufacturers with more than 20 employees.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Helping manufacturers in Maryland, where the sector has changed - and shrunk - dramatically in the last generation, takes a certain type of person. Like Brian Sweeney, an engineer and attorney who grew up in a factory. Sweeney is executive director of the Maryland Manufacturing Extension Partnership. The Columbia nonprofit works with small and medium-sized makers of goods in the state to identify problems and opportunities and is among the groups that launched a Make it in Maryland campaign last week.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
The state's economic development agency has unveiled a new strategy it hopes will be the first step toward reversing the decline of manufacturing in Maryland."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
HAGERSTOWN — Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler brought his all-but-official campaign for governor to Western Maryland on Friday, pledging to help rebuild the state's manufacturing base by giving Maryland companies preference in securing government contracts. Gansler, speaking at a United Auto Workers union hall near Hagerstown's Mack Truck/Volvo plant, laid out a seven-point plan to increase the manufacturing sector, which he said now ranks 43rd in the nation. The most significant of those steps would be a reversal of Maryland's decades-old policy of letting in-state and out-of-state companies compete on an equal basis for billions of dollars annually in state contracts.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | January 1, 1995
Encouraged by the business upturn last year, Maryland manufacturers are expecting more of the same this year, barring a damaging interest rate increase by the Federal Reserve Bank.With backlog and profit margins up, some companies are poised to begin hiring new workers instead of relying on overtime to meet production needs, said J. Alexander Doyle III, the chairman of the Maryland Manufacturers Association.Yet this hiring would not be enough to offset the general downward trend in manufacturing employment, he said.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2001
Maryland manufacturers scored a victory yesterday as the House of Delegates and a key Senate committee approved identical bills shifting the burden of the corporate income tax to out-of-state companies. The legislation will now go to the full Senate, where its passage is virtually assured after receiving the backing of the Budget and Taxation Committee. The Glendening administration supports the measure, which passed the House 130-6. The bill was supported by many of the state's largest manufacturers - including Black & Decker Corp.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1995
In a sign that Maryland's economy is expanding, businesses in the state reported strong sales and optimism in March -- stronger even than their competitors in the booming states to the south.A Federal Reserve survey of its southeast district released yesterday showed that all the interviewed retail stores in Maryland, for example, saw increases in sales in March and expect to see further increases during the next six months.In addition, half of all Maryland manufacturers interviewed reported increased sales last month.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1995
Robert Willingham resented writing $26,000 worth of checks to a big insurance company for workers' compensation coverage for his small and struggling East Baltimore factory."
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | January 22, 1993
NEW YORK -- One day into President Clinton's first term, the Federal Reserve handed him its read on the nation's economy with a report showing increased confidence in the recovery.The generally upbeat assessment, however, was tempered by a dearth of jobs and California's poor showing. In addition, a separate Fed report on manufacturing in Maryland showed a downturn in December, though optimism for the future."Reports . . . indicate continued improvement in economic conditions across much of the nation," the nation's central bank said in its report, compiled from its 12 regional banks.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1995
After three years of sporadic growth and rising optimism, Maryland retailers and service providers turned leery last month, as poor Easter sales raised fears that the economic recovery had ended.While the Maryland manufacturing sector continued to produce hopeful signs through April, service companies said their revenues fell last month, a survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, Va., reported yesterday.And service companies say they fear demand will keep dropping in the next six months.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2013
As Maryland contemplates passing one of the nation's strictest gun laws, at least seven other states have courted its gun manufacturers, offering tax incentives and open arms elsewhere. The governor of Texas, West Virginia's House speaker and an Illinois congressman have written to Beretta USA officials, inviting a move and promising a better business climate if the 400-year-old Italian company chooses to abandon its U.S. headquarters on the Potomac. Another arms manufacturer and defense contractor on the Eastern Shore, LWRC International, received offers, some including tax incentives, from elected or government officials in Nebraska, Mississippi, North Dakota, Nevada, Texas and West Virginia, a company executive said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Cosmetics firm Revlon Inc. says it is ending manufacturing operations in Maryland as part of a global reorganization that will eliminate about 250 jobs. The company refused to say Friday where its local facility is located or how many of the layoffs will hit there. The operation is not likely large — the Regional Manufacturing Institute of Maryland hadn't heard of it and state economic development officials could find no record of it. Revlon has not sent state regulators a layoff-warning notice, the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2004
For years, Baltimore-based architecture and design firm RTKL Associates earned about 15 percent of its profits from overseas projects tax-free, thanks to a federal export subsidy designed to help U.S. firms compete abroad. Then the World Trade Organization declared the subsidy illegal, leaving RTKL and thousands of other U.S. firms wondering what would happen to their profits from overseas business. They got their answer this week when Congress declared RTKL - a firm that makes most of its money turning out drawings and plans - a U.S. manufacturer deserving of a tax break.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2003
Maryland's manufacturing sector, a small but potent piece of the state's economy, will continue to struggle and not see much improvement until later this year or in early 2004, economists and analysts said. And the 3,300 workers at bankrupt Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant are bracing for job reductions and the possibility of a new owner. "It still remains a very difficult time for manufacturing companies," said Pradeep Ganguly, chief economist in Maryland's Department of Business and Economic Development.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 22, 2002
THIS WEEK, in an effort to reduce costs and fatten up the bottom line, Black & Decker announced that it was shifting jobs from the Eastern Shore to Mexico and other places where labor is even cheaper than the $7.50 an hour it was paying some workers in Talbot County. Call me crazy, but I was just wondering if they could find a CEO in Mexico willing to work for less than what B&D top boss Nolan Archibald made last year. Nollie's compensation in 2001 was $2.3 million, plus use of the company airplane and reimbursement for "financial counseling fees."
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 15, 2002
TODAY'S COLUMN is about corporate income taxes -- but wait! Don't go away! We're serving bagels and coffee, and anyone who reads this column will be eligible for an all-expenses-paid trip to the Cayman Islands with your choice of escorts -- Jennifer Lopez, The Rock, robbed-of-gold Olympic figure skater Jamie Sale or Czech hockey hunk Jaromir Jagr. OK, I made up the part about the bagels. And J-Lo never got back to me. But look, I only make these empty promises because I'm like you -- when someone mentions corporate income taxes, a crust forms on my eyes.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF DpA | May 15, 1998
Maryland manufacturers yesterday said the global climate treaty negotiated in Kyoto, Japan, would raise energy costs, threaten thousands of state jobs and shrink tax revenue by millions of dollars."
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
The state's economic development agency unveiled yesterday a new strategy it hopes will be the first step toward reversing the decline of manufacturing in Maryland."
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2001
Maryland manufacturers scored a victory yesterday as the House of Delegates and a key Senate committee approved identical bills shifting the burden of the corporate income tax to out-of-state companies. The legislation will now go to the full Senate, where its passage is virtually assured after receiving the backing of the Budget and Taxation Committee. The Glendening administration supports the measure, which passed the House 130-6. The bill was supported by many of the state's largest manufacturers - including Black & Decker Corp.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2001
Maryland manufacturers appear to be escaping the brunt of the current nationwide economic slowdown, but some companies say they are feeling the effects of the country's declining fortunes. National reports show manufacturing slowing more rapidly than the economy as a whole, with some even arguing that the sector is in recession. But Maryland may be in a good position to weather the rough period: The state has already lost so many blue-collar jobs that manufacturing makes up a much smaller percentage of the labor force here than it does in the nation as a whole.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.