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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Vowing to strengthen Maryland's middle class, Gov. Martin O'Malley signed legislation Monday that will gradually raise the state's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour — his No. 1 legislative priority for the last of his eight years in office. The measure was among more than 200 bills the governor signed into law at a State House ceremony. Others included a ban on the sale of most grain alcohol, reforms to Baltimore's liquor board and expansion of the city's needle-exchange program to prevent AIDS.
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NEWS
July 17, 2014
The recent comments by Vincent DeMarco ( "Tougher gun laws are helping reduce homicides in Baltimore," July 5) are flawed in many respects. First he only points to New York City for statistics that support his views, but when other large cities like Chicago with strict gun laws are used, the reverse is true. Second Mr. DeMarco and The Baltimore Sun never report the statistics of how many people arrested for violent crimes have legal weapons. Third, the Maryland law has not made it more difficult for criminals to purchase firearms; rather, it has created a revenue source for the state and made it more difficult for law abiding citizens to purchase firearms.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Suspects arrested for violent crimes or burglaries will again have to submit to DNA collections, officials with several Maryland law enforcement agencies said Thursday. A day after U.S. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. authorized the practice to resume, at least temporarily, a number of police departments said they had decided to collect samples as they await further word from the high court. Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has asked the Supreme Court to decide whether collecting the genetic information before a person is convicted violates the Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure.
NEWS
June 12, 2014
Republican primary voters are blessed with the deepest field of candidates they've had for governor in a generation - four men who each bring compelling stories to their quests to replace Gov. Martin O'Malley. David Craig is the teacher turned legislator, mayor and county executive. Ron George is a one-time soap opera actor who is now a state delegate and (literally) a Main Street business owner. Larry Hogan is a former state cabinet secretary and son of the first Republican congressman to announce that he would vote to impeach Richard Nixon.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
For Eddie Germino, being unemployed for a time last year worked to his advantage in a dispute with his Maryland landlord. Germino, 27, had moved out of the house where he had lived with other students. Now he was trying to get his security deposit back. "Since I had so much free time," he says, "I was able to do all the legal research and make all the calls and write all the letters. " And his efforts paid off. A court ordered the landlord earlier this year to pay Germino $2,700 — three times his original deposit.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
A federal judge rejected requests Tuesday to block Maryland's new ban on the sale of assault rifles and to prevent enforcement of a new handgun licensing program. In denying a temporary restraining order, U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake said the plaintiffs undercut their argument for an emergency suspension of the gun control law by waiting to challenge it until a few days before it took effect. "This suit could have been brought months ago, but it was not," Blake said. The constitutional challenge to the ban — and whether the Second Amendment guarantees the right to buy an assault-style rifle to protect one's home — will be the subject of a future hearing and remains to be decided.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
Those who promote the right to carry around a handgun in public were no doubt disappointed by the U.S. Supreme Court's decision this week not to take up Maryland's handgun permit law. Certainly quite a few could be found sharing their rather disparaging views of the nation's highest court in colorful language on the Internet, including at baltimoresun.com. But what they should not be is surprised. While opponents of the Maryland law enjoyed a brief victory when a U.S. District Court judge found it violated the Second Amendment last year, that decision hinged on an overly broad view of District of Columbia V. Heller, the 2008 landmark Supreme Court case that spoke to the individual's right to own and bear firearms within the home.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1998
Lesbian and gay activists are challenging a 1916 Maryland law they say criminalizes their sex lives. Their lawsuit is part of a national campaign to wipe off the books similar state laws across the country.The activists and civil libertarians have targeted Maryland and other states -- such as Arkansas -- which they say have laws that single out homosexuals.Maryland's law makes it illegal for people of the same gender to engage in oral sex. They can face up to 10 years in prison under the law. The law makes anal sex illegal for all. Though the plaintiffs concede the criminal laws are rarely enforced against people engaging in consensual sex behind closed doors, they say the anti-sodomy law has other ramifications.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | September 23, 1992
REESE -- Carol Everett said she became involved in the abortion industry "believing I was helping women exercise their right to choose a safe, legal abortion."But, she told about 35 people in a speech here last night, "The reality is that I was involved in the murder of 35,000 babies and the maiming or death of at least 20 of those mothers."Sponsored by the Vote kNOw Coalition of Maryland, Ms. Everett has several speaking engagements across the state, in addition to last night's appearance at Clearfield Bible Church.
BUSINESS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
A state appeals court declared unconstitutional yesterday a Maryland statute that prevents employers from using strikebreakers, ruling that such labor laws are the domain of federal regulators.The Court of Special Appeals ruled that the 66-year-old National Labor Relations Act pre-empts a state law that blocked use of temporary agencies to hire replacement workers during a strike.The court's decision affirmed a July 25 ruling by Prince George's County Circuit Judge Steven I. Platt to dismiss a suit by the Professional Staff Nurses Association.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
If patients in Maryland want to learn about complaints or concerns about their doctors, there is little that can be made public under state law. But that's not the case in all states. Complaints made to medical licensing boards are made public in nine states, according to the Federation of State Medical Boards. Here and in most of the rest of the country, complaints are kept confidential. The Maryland Board of Physicians makes allegations public only when it has taken action to discipline a doctor.
SPORTS
By Ryan Bacic, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
For the first two months of her Western High gym class, special education teacher LaDonna Schemm didn't notice. Then a freshman, the ever-bubbly Joy Keene-El would get out of her wheelchair and do everything thrown her way, from tennis to baseball to swimming. One day, when the physical fitness test came around, she did 61 pushups. But eventually an activity came that Keene-El said she couldn't do. And so an incredulous Schemm asked why not. "Look," Keene-El said, hoisting a pant leg. "I don't have any knees.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
With $50 million a year in county revenues on the line, the U.S. Supreme Court said Tuesday it would hear a challenge to a ruling by Maryland's highest court that some taxes on out-of-state income are collected in violation of the Constitution. A Howard County business owner and his wife challenged the tax laws, arguing that they were being taxed twice on some income. The Maryland Court of Appeals agreed in a ruling last year, saying that the state's power to levy taxes on income earned outside its borders is limited.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
The type of campaign account that Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is using to bolster candidates he favors is used widely in Maryland politics, but critics say it lacks transparency. Kamenetz transferred more than $100,000 of his campaign funds last year to A Better Baltimore County, a slate fund that will be able to transfer unlimited amounts of money to other slate members in this year's elections. Jennifer Bevan-Dangel, executive director of the watchdog group Common Cause Maryland, says slates in Maryland "tend to have a lot more ability to move money around" than those in other states.
NEWS
May 12, 2014
If the tone of your editorial on Maryland's transgender rights law was intended to inflame, in my view it was very successful ( "Another misguided petition drive," May 4). I am not writing to restate the objection and outrage that I - and hopefully a majority of Marylanders from both sides of the political spectrum - harbor toward this bill. But I would like to make one point here, and that is that this legislation is a perfect example of a measure that tramples the rights of a large majority in order to "protect" a small minority.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Vowing to strengthen Maryland's middle class, Gov. Martin O'Malley signed legislation Monday that will gradually raise the state's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour — his No. 1 legislative priority for the last of his eight years in office. The measure was among more than 200 bills the governor signed into law at a State House ceremony. Others included a ban on the sale of most grain alcohol, reforms to Baltimore's liquor board and expansion of the city's needle-exchange program to prevent AIDS.
NEWS
May 25, 2000
WITH the dropping of state charges against Linda Tripp, she passes from history and need never trouble her fellow Marylanders again. Some will wonder what this federal civil servant does at the Defense Department to earn a salary in a classification for which she does not appear qualified, and whether she will go on doing it. But that is a minor matter. Linda Tripp is world famous for violating Maryland's law against recording a telephone call when one of the parties does not know it is being recorded.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
I'm writing in response to the letter "Maryland needs Mizeur's death with dignity law" (April 27) by Alan D. Eason. Mr. Eason makes a very controversial statement when he says that "Maryland law should be changed to allow mentally competent, terminally ill adults to legally choose aid in dying when palliative and hospice care can no longer provide, for them, a satisfactory life. " The key phrase is "mentally competent. " A person can be not competent for a certain period of time and then may be competent after the situation subsides, such as any medical crisis.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
The continued existence of Maryland's death row a year after the General Assembly abolished capital punishment was brought into question by two events this month, one obvious and one less so. The first is the death, apparently of natural causes, of one of the five inmates put in limbo after the death penalty repeal, John Booth-el. As a result, advocates are renewing their questions about whether it would be appropriate for Maryland to go forward with executions now that the legislature has found the death penalty inappropriate.
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