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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Suspects arrested for violent crimes or burglaries will again have to submit to DNA collections, officials with several Maryland law enforcement agencies said Thursday. A day after U.S. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. authorized the practice to resume, at least temporarily, a number of police departments said they had decided to collect samples as they await further word from the high court. Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has asked the Supreme Court to decide whether collecting the genetic information before a person is convicted violates the Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
After a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Maryland election officials said Friday that they will no longer enforce a state law that imposes an overall limit of $10,000 on campaign contributions in a four-year election cycle. State officials said they would continue to enforce a Maryland law limiting individuals to contributing no more than $4,000 to a particular candidate during an election cycle. Donors, however, are now free to give $4,000 to as many candidates as desired. Without the limit, moneyed donors are likely to give more - or be asked to give more - and lower-profile races are more likely to get their attention.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
For Eddie Germino, being unemployed for a time last year worked to his advantage in a dispute with his Maryland landlord. Germino, 27, had moved out of the house where he had lived with other students. Now he was trying to get his security deposit back. "Since I had so much free time," he says, "I was able to do all the legal research and make all the calls and write all the letters. " And his efforts paid off. A court ordered the landlord earlier this year to pay Germino $2,700 — three times his original deposit.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
Regarding The Sun's assessment of the General Assembly session just ended, I am equally underwhelmed by the current state legislature but for completely different reasons ("General Assembly 2014: The good, bad and so-so," April 8). I view our career politician form of government as an annual shopping trip in which lawmakers spend, spend, spend and recite the Maryland mantra of "we haven't raised that tax in X years. " Considering Maryland has every tax there is right down to one for flushing your toilet, that is a large list.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
A federal judge rejected requests Tuesday to block Maryland's new ban on the sale of assault rifles and to prevent enforcement of a new handgun licensing program. In denying a temporary restraining order, U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake said the plaintiffs undercut their argument for an emergency suspension of the gun control law by waiting to challenge it until a few days before it took effect. "This suit could have been brought months ago, but it was not," Blake said. The constitutional challenge to the ban — and whether the Second Amendment guarantees the right to buy an assault-style rifle to protect one's home — will be the subject of a future hearing and remains to be decided.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1998
Lesbian and gay activists are challenging a 1916 Maryland law they say criminalizes their sex lives. Their lawsuit is part of a national campaign to wipe off the books similar state laws across the country.The activists and civil libertarians have targeted Maryland and other states -- such as Arkansas -- which they say have laws that single out homosexuals.Maryland's law makes it illegal for people of the same gender to engage in oral sex. They can face up to 10 years in prison under the law. The law makes anal sex illegal for all. Though the plaintiffs concede the criminal laws are rarely enforced against people engaging in consensual sex behind closed doors, they say the anti-sodomy law has other ramifications.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | September 23, 1992
REESE -- Carol Everett said she became involved in the abortion industry "believing I was helping women exercise their right to choose a safe, legal abortion."But, she told about 35 people in a speech here last night, "The reality is that I was involved in the murder of 35,000 babies and the maiming or death of at least 20 of those mothers."Sponsored by the Vote kNOw Coalition of Maryland, Ms. Everett has several speaking engagements across the state, in addition to last night's appearance at Clearfield Bible Church.
BUSINESS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
A state appeals court declared unconstitutional yesterday a Maryland statute that prevents employers from using strikebreakers, ruling that such labor laws are the domain of federal regulators.The Court of Special Appeals ruled that the 66-year-old National Labor Relations Act pre-empts a state law that blocked use of temporary agencies to hire replacement workers during a strike.The court's decision affirmed a July 25 ruling by Prince George's County Circuit Judge Steven I. Platt to dismiss a suit by the Professional Staff Nurses Association.
NEWS
May 25, 2000
WITH the dropping of state charges against Linda Tripp, she passes from history and need never trouble her fellow Marylanders again. Some will wonder what this federal civil servant does at the Defense Department to earn a salary in a classification for which she does not appear qualified, and whether she will go on doing it. But that is a minor matter. Linda Tripp is world famous for violating Maryland's law against recording a telephone call when one of the parties does not know it is being recorded.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2010
The police officers who make up the Maryland Law hockey team play weekend games against fellow officers, military groups or firefighters. This Saturday, the last game of the season, they take to the ice against retired professional players. In a game organized as a benefit for a fellow officer who was sidelined from the Baltimore County force as a result of line-of-duty injury, Maryland Law will face off against the Washington Capitals Alumni, retirees who can still skate a good game.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Anne Arundel County police want parents to talk to their kids about sexting. The police department said in a Thursday release that it has received complaints involving "partially nude, nude, or sexually explicit photographs of juveniles" being posted on social networking sites like Instagram that reference Anne Arundel County high schools. Juveniles who send and receive nude photos of themselves or their peers can face serious legal ramifications including child pornography charges.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Gayle Hafner, a senior staff attorney of the Maryland Disability Law Center and a co-founder of Medicaid Matters Maryland who was an outspoken advocate for those with disabilities, died March 22 of a heart attack during an operation at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 60. "A premier civil rights attorney, Ms. Hafner sounded a voice for children in foster care and people with disabilities," said Lauren Young, director of litigation for the Maryland Disability Law Center.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
Maryland State Trooper Jacqueline Kline was grateful to return to work after months of medical care, she says, but it's tough for her to listen to the dispatch radio at the Glen Burnie Barrack. "It's very frustrating because I just want to get back on the road," the 26-year-old said Tuesday in her first public comments since she was critically injured in a car crash in October. Kline was assisting a fellow police officer who had pulled over a suspected drunken driver on Route 100 in Pasadena when she was struck by a passing car. She was thrown onto the hood of the passing car, then onto a police vehicle, police said.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and The Washington Post | March 14, 2014
A Montgomery County woman accused of stabbing her children in a bloody exorcism was formally indicted on first-degree murder charges Thursday. Her attorney said he plans to pursue an insanity defense. Brian Shefferman, who represents Zakieya Avery, said his client probably was not criminally responsible for her conduct Jan. 17 inside a townhouse in Germantown. “I think the evidence will show she was clearly seriously mentally ill at the time,” he said. Avery was indicted on two counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of her 18-month-old son, Norell Harris, and 2-year-old daughter, Zyana Harris.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
A Senate committee voted 8-3 Friday to approve a measure decriminalizing possession of small amounts of marijuana, sending it to the full chamber next week. The bill would replace criminal penalties for possession of up to 10 grams of the drug with a $100 civil fine that would be handled much like a parking ticket. Maryland law now makes possession a misdemeanor with penalties of up to 90 days in jail and a fine of up to $500. The legislation, which has bipartisan sponsorship, is expected to pass the Senate but faces an uncertain future in the House, which killed it last year after the upper chamber approved it. The House has a work group studying the broader question of how to treat marijuana in state law, including proposals to allow expanded medical use of the drug.
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler and Michael Dresser | March 6, 2014
The House of Delegates passed a package of bills seeking to curb domestic violence Thursday, including three sponsored by Gov. Martin O'Malley. The administration bills would lower the standard of proof for a victim of domestic violence to obtain a protective order from a court, expand the circumstances under which judges can issue permanent orders to stay away from a victim and allow an extra penalty of up to five years when an abuser commits a...
NEWS
September 25, 1997
CRIMES SUCH AS last week's kidnapping in Columbia of Stephanie Musick by an obsessed admirer are frustrating. John Robert Righter, a former co-worker of Ms. Musick's at a department store, had followed the college student and made unwanted advances for some time.Legally, however, there was little that could be done to keep Mr. Righter away from her. There is no legal way to lock someone up for a crime he or she hasn't yet committed.Maryland does have laws against stalking and harassment, but there were no grounds for charging Mr. Righter with either until Friday's kidnapping.
NEWS
By Anthony G. Brown and Joseph T. Jones Jr | March 3, 2014
Marylanders are ready for an open and serious discussion about our state's laws pertaining to the possession of small amounts of marijuana. As currently constructed and enforced, these laws are costly, ineffective and racially biased, and they result in a permanent blot on the records of too many of our young adults. Criminal arrest and prosecution for small amounts of marijuana is not the most effective strategy to keep our neighborhoods safe, and it draws resources away from the fight against violent crime.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
Your editorial regarding Baltimore County schools that references my letter to the Hereford High School parents who oppose the high school schedule change ignores the primary thrust of my communication ( "Signs of trouble?" Feb. 25). Maryland law sets out the duties and responsibilities of the county superintendent of schools, as well as the function of the county school board. The matter of class schedules is undoubtedly an operational/administrative issue for the superintendent and not a governance issue for the school board.
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