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By Sloane Brown | October 7, 2001
The tent set up on Mount Royal Avenue contained an H.G. Wells kind of universe, one where his time-travel machine had gone nuts. Marie Antoinette was mingling with '60s flower children. Civil War Southern belles rubbed shoulders with zoot-suited hipsters. Bobby-soxers, Wild West cowboys, and hippies danced to the tunes of a swing band. This "Fete of Lights 2001" celebrated the Maryland Institute College of Art's 175th anniversary, so guests were asked to dress in costumes from any of those 175 years.
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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Nita Strickland and Sidney Garland, best friends since the sixth grade, have shared a lot - their hopes and daily frustrations, an interest in some of the same music and TV shows. Now in college, even though they are of opposite sexes, the students share a tiny dorm room on Towson University's campus. What would have been considered taboo just a few decades ago has become more common. Coed dormitories, which shocked some when introduced in the 1970s, have given way to coed rooms.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | January 31, 1991
Although contemporary sculptors have been knocking sculpture off its pedestal for decades now, it can still be a bit of a jolt to see some of the new ways they bring material together.An ambitious exhibit at the Maryland Institute College of Art, "Critical Mass," includes sculptors from this country and Germany. Although this is a non-thematic exhibit, there are still some common traits to be found in work that otherwise is all over the map. Most of the pieces are installation-oriented, use nonconventional sculptural material that is assembled more than sculpted, comment on environmental or consumer issues, and convey a sense of sculpture as a matter of continual process rather than neatly contained high-art product.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
The old arched red wooden door to the Seventh Metro Church is less that two blocks from the modern glass-and-steel panel that floats in front of the Maryland Institute College of Art 's newest exhibition space. They bring to mind two different eras and seem designed to be used by two dissimilar groups of people: spiky-haired artists and church ladies wearing fancy hats. But when a white art student in her 20s met a middle-aged African-American pastor, they discovered that both doors opened into sacred spaces where people look for answers to the same big questions.
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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,sun reporter | September 20, 2006
The National Symphony Orchestra performed a concert of video-game music last month at Wolf Trap in Virginia. Madden NFL 07 grossed more than $100 million in the sports video game's first week -- rivaling the initial ticket sales for The Da Vinci Code. Open Newsweek and read all about the World of Warcraft, a game your son or husband might know all too well. The video game phenomenon, an $8.4 billion industry, was just an art show waiting to happen. If you go Big Huge Games: From Concept to Game runs through Oct. 8 at the Rosenberg Gallery, Brown Center, Maryland Institute College of Art. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.
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By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
Madiz Gomez had a painting, a paper and an animation project to finish by today, the last day of classes at Maryland Institute College of Art. She also was practically broke. So when three people from MICA's Office of Student Affairs stopped by late at night with baskets of snacks and tangerines, Gomez gratefully accepted some chips and fruit. "Just what I need," she said. Welcome to the frenetic world of finals, where students engage in the tradition of skipping sustenance, sleep and showers while frantically trying to get projects done and kicking themselves for not starting earlier.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Her bold canvases made her a bright star in the 1950s New York art world, but she "sank from view faster than the Titanic" when she moved to Baltimore, The New York Times said. Grace Hartigan, who ultimately found a second career offering her wisdom and advice to generations of young painters at the Maryland Institute College of Art, died of liver failure yesterday at the Lorien Mays Chapel nursing home. She was 86. "I feel that I am an aristocrat as far as painting is concerned; I believe in beautiful drawing, in elegance, in luminous color and light," she said in a 1990 biography.
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By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2001
Consider the comma. At first glance, it might seem insignificant - a period with a tail, a raindrop in the wind, respected only by grammarians. But the guardians of Baltimore's most prestigious art school think otherwise. The comma, they say, can loom very large, creating divisions where none exist, acting as a Berlin Wall of punctuation. Which is why, after a year of deliberation, the Maryland Institute, College of Art is casting the comma aside. As the fall semester kicked off this week, the word came down to returning professors and students: Henceforth, the art school in Bolton Hill will be the Maryland Institute College of Art - no comma, no pause, no division.
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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | November 10, 2001
The man whose lyrics formed the philosophical backbone of my grad school experience, who was lead singer and muse for the '80s rock band Talking Heads, who has recorded myriad solo albums, written books, created a stream of videos, presented photography exhibitions, composed the music for a Twyla Tharp dance, shared an Oscar for the score of Bernardo Bertolucci's The Last Emperor, is - right now - trying to unscrew a lightbulb. David Byrne is midway up a ladder at the Maryland Institute College of Art. He's putting the finishing touches on an exhibit featuring his photography and a new visual-and-audio installation.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
The old arched red wooden door to the Seventh Metro Church is less that two blocks from the modern glass-and-steel panel that floats in front of the Maryland Institute College of Art 's newest exhibition space. They bring to mind two different eras and seem designed to be used by two dissimilar groups of people: spiky-haired artists and church ladies wearing fancy hats. But when a white art student in her 20s met a middle-aged African-American pastor, they discovered that both doors opened into sacred spaces where people look for answers to the same big questions.
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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2013
About a half-dozen people at a time pitched in Saturday to help Baltimore artist Wilson Kemp complete a mural during Artscape. They crouched near the bottom of the canvas, perched on a step stool or squeezed in somewhere in the middle, ignoring the heat as they gripped paint brushes and zeroed in on their own small corners of a bigger picture. At the 32nd annual Baltimore festival, it was community art in progress. The grassy park across from the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall became home to the first ever "10,000 brushes" project, billed as a "mural experience" during the event that calls itself America's biggest free arts festival.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Gladys C. Spare, a retired antiques dealer and artist who was a self-proclaimed Francophile, died June 22 at the Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm of complications from a fall she had suffered two weeks earlier. She was 94. The daughter of a carpenter and a dressmaker, Gladys Catherine Woods was born and raised in Trenton, N.J. After graduating in 1936 from Hamilton High School, she attended an art school in New Jersey, and later at the Maryland Institute College of Art . She also studied with R. McGill Mackall, the Maryland muralist and Dickeyville resident, who died in 1982.
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June 12, 2013
For years, it has baffled and frustrated me that Baltimore, the home of Maryland Institute College of Art s, one of the country's premier schools of art and design, is a city with so few professional opportunities for artists. We virtually force our professional artists to look for job prospects and commissions in Philadelphia, New York and on the West Coast. With few commercial galleries and only a small pool of patrons interested in contemporary and emerging artists, Baltimore is uniquely positioned as an "artsy" city where artists produce high quality work for its own sake rather than for the marketplace.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2011
When painting student Jennifer Tam studied a series of Marcel Duchamp prints of boldly colored, spinning discs, she became convinced that the enigmatic works had to be included in the big new show opening Sundayat the Baltimore Museum of Art . "Twelve Rotoreliefs," the 1935 series by the French Surrealist master, is deceptively simple. Duchamp originally conceived of the record-shaped platters as children's toys and tried unsuccessfully to sell them at Macy's. But a professor later used the reliefs to restore the illusion of three-dimensional sight to a World War I veteran who had been blinded in one eye. "Art can have value in the most unexpected ways," the 22-year-old Tam told her classmates in the Johns Hopkins University's museums and society program.
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By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2011
Christine O'Neill is petrified by sharks. But when she came across a school of them recently, hungry for food, she knew what she had to do. "Facing My Fears I and II" are two paintings that O'Neill created to capture her encounter with the sharks. They're on display through Aug. 21 at the Annapolis Maritime Museum as part of an exhibit of paintings and illustrations by her and her husband, Dave O'Neill, two longtime Anne Arundel County residents-turned-sailors whose art celebrates life at sea. "I … am totally afraid of sharks," Christine says in a narrative that accompanies her shark paintings.
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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
Doreen Bolger's home wasn't built for art. It's not one of those open-air boxes made of white walls and windows, the ceilings laced with pinpoint spotlights and the rooms furnished with sculpture instead of cozy settees. It is, instead, a failed attempt at a rowhouse on St. Paul Street in what was once Peabody Heights. The flat front and the breezeway side entrances were such a disappointment in 1872 that not another one was built. Inside, the home of the director of the Baltimore Museum of Art is warm, but so modestly lit that the stairs to the second floor should carry a warning.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | January 9, 2008
Dr. Theodore E. Klitzke, former dean of the faculty and vice president for academic affairs at the Maryland Institute College of Art, where he had also been acting president, died Sunday of complications from a stroke at Manor Care Ruxton. He was 92. Dr. Klitzke was born and raised in Chicago. He attended the American Academy of Art in Chicago from 1934 to 1936 and earned a bachelor's degree in fine arts from the Art Institute of Chicago in 1939.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 20, 2010
William J. Evitts, a noted writer, editor and historian who was a former college professor, died Dec. 14 of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 68. The son of a U.S. Department of Labor official and a homemaker, Dr. Evitts was born in Chicago and raised in Arlington, Va., where he graduated from Washington and Lee High School. He earned his bachelor's degree in 1964 from the Johns Hopkins University and was a Thomas Jefferson Fellow at the University of Virginia, where he earned a master's degree in 1966.
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