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NEWS
June 3, 1994
Pianist Cyrus Chestnut will perform through Sunday at the Maryland Inn's King of France Tavern.Other June performers are Charlie Byrd, June 10-12; Deanna Bogart, June 17-18; Bruno and Bollenback, June 19; and the Hard Travelers, June 24-26.Performances are 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 8:30 p.m. Sunday.Information: 263-2641.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
A fledgling organization devoted to the history of the Continental Congress — and creating a permanent home in Annapolis for examining that period in American history — took steps last week toward its goal. The Annapolis Continental Congress Society announced that it will hold its second festival Sept. 14-18 in the city, according to Mark Croatti, director of the organization. The first festival was held last year. In addition, a 16-member board of directors of the National Continental Congress Center Founders' Association has been formed with the goal of finding a permanent home for the organization.
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NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Staff Writer | May 24, 1992
What do you get when the original American music combines with the architecture of the country's earliest days? A jazz room that has thrived over two decades and has helped revive a city.Back in 1968, the Maryland Inn was a dumpy dowager at the top of Annapolis' Main Street with a beauty shop, Chamber of Commerce office and employee locker room in the basement.Today, the inn is the stylish doyenne of a chain of five hotels in restored buildings, and its old locker room has become the King of France Tavern, a venue for jazz, folk and fusion artists.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,chris.guy@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
Annapolis officials say they've believed it all along, but they aren't about to turn down two national accolades that have put the city in the limelight. First came news Wednesday that the city's Main Street was named one of 10 great streets in the country by the American Planning Association, through the organization's Great Places in America program. A day later, Forbes Traveler magazine chimed in to note Annapolis as one of the 20 prettiest towns in America. Mayor Ellen O. Moyer called it a double dose of praise for a city she says deserves the recognition.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
The historic Maryland Inn in Annapolis fired an employee this week amid charges of racism and threats from top legislators to boycott the popular State House haunt if action wasn't taken.Jeb Bello was given a termination slip Wednesday for "rudeness to guests with the outcome of loss of business" after an incident in which Del. Melony Ghee Griffith, an African-American from Prince George's County, said she and her companion, a constituent, were denied service, treated badly and told to wait even though tables were open.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1999
To the management of the Historic Inns of Annapolis, the incident in which a legislator was refused prompt service at the Maryland Inn was a mortifying lapse in customer service.But to Del. Melony Ghee Griffith, an African-American from Prince George's County, the rude treatment she received when she brought a black constituent to lunch at the inns' Treaty of Paris restaurant Wednesday afternoon was about as subtle as a "whites only" sign outside the Annapolis landmark.By yesterday, word of the incident was spreading through the House of Delegates, prompting leaders of the Prince George's County and Baltimore delegations to threaten to cease doing business with the inn and its sister properties.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
The Annapolis Historic Preservation Commission unanimously approved proposed changes to the Maryland Inn's exterior last night, clearing the way for a Starbucks coffee shop to open on the ground floor. A wheelchair-lift access plan, previously a sticking point, was presented by project architect Shellie H. Gazlay. Jean Tullier, an Annapolis-based spokeswoman for Remington Hotels, which manages the 1780s-vintage inn, said yesterday, "This is the last hoop for them to jump through." The five-member city panel approved without debate other changes to the hotel facade, including a Starbucks siren logo -- 3 feet in diameter -- new windows, landscaping and removal of the existing stairwell where the wheelchair platform lift will be installed.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
A manager fired from the Maryland Inn amid charges of racism has filed suit against the Maryland legislator he says ruined his reputation and got him fired.Jeb Bello, 24, was fired March 10 for "rudeness to guests" after an incident in which Del. Melony Ghee Griffith, an African-American from Prince George's County, said she and her companion, a constituent, were denied service, treated badly and told to wait even though tables were open and a white couple was seated.The incident galvanized many state legislators and Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who threatened to boycott the popular Annapolis restaurant if action wasn't taken.
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | June 25, 1991
Even though school is out, there's still a homecoming to celebrate.This weekend, the Inkspots, a legendary singing group and one of popular music's most enduring institutions, returns to the Maryland Inn's King of France Tavern in Annapolis for the first time in six years."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1999
To the management of the Historic Inns of Annapolis, the incident in which a legislator was refused prompt service at the Maryland Inn was a mortifying lapse in customer service.But to Del. Melony Ghee Griffith, an African-American from Prince George's County, the rude treatment she received when she brought a black constituent to lunch at the inns' Treaty of Paris restaurant Wednesday afternoon was about as subtle as a "whites only" sign outside the Annapolis landmark.By yesterday, word of the incident was spreading through the House of Delegates, prompting leaders of the Prince George's County and Baltimore delegations to threaten to cease doing business with the inn and its sister properties.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | February 7, 2007
Next month, a 3-foot Starbucks logo will adorn the historic Main Street facade where inside Revolutionary schemes were once traded over draughts of ale and cider. The opening of the city's third outlet of the worldwide coffee chain in late March will cap a year of securing city approvals and renovations in the Maryland Inn - but it is not likely to decaffeinate the controversy. For a few critics, including Mayor Ellen O. Moyer, another link of the worldwide gourmet coffee chain was about as welcome as the British Redcoats back in Washington's day. She called the idea "a missed opportunity for something really special."
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
The Annapolis Historic Preservation Commission unanimously approved proposed changes to the Maryland Inn's exterior last night, clearing the way for a Starbucks coffee shop to open on the ground floor. A wheelchair-lift access plan, previously a sticking point, was presented by project architect Shellie H. Gazlay. Jean Tullier, an Annapolis-based spokeswoman for Remington Hotels, which manages the 1780s-vintage inn, said yesterday, "This is the last hoop for them to jump through." The five-member city panel approved without debate other changes to the hotel facade, including a Starbucks siren logo -- 3 feet in diameter -- new windows, landscaping and removal of the existing stairwell where the wheelchair platform lift will be installed.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
Starbucks is renewing its efforts to put a 21st-century coffee shop in the 18th-century Maryland Inn in Annapolis. The idea drew protests when it was first raised a few months ago, but the Seattle-based corporation has modified its plan and won some important supporters for the idea of opening a high-end coffee shop in a place that once housed a tavern visited by George Washington. The Annapolis Historic Preservation Commission is scheduled to consider tonight proposed changes to the property's exterior to accommodate a Starbucks-licensed store - similar to a franchise.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | December 13, 2005
George Washington is said to have gambled away a horse there. Later, jazz legend Charlie Byrd serenaded fans in late-night jam sessions in the cozy brick room. And, if the Annapolis historic preservation commission goes along tonight, you'll be able to order a tall pumpkin spice latte in the room, in the basement of the Maryland Inn. Plans by Starbucks to occupy the former King of France Tavern have some city leaders lamenting an encroaching sameness in the heart of the Colonial capital.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2004
Hug. Hug. Hug. That's what Peg Bednarsky does on Move-in Day, when members of the Maryland General Assembly arrive with their luggage at her hotel on State Circle in Annapolis. "Welcome home!" she enthuses as they drift in the day before they go back to work. "I love you," she tells Del. Jimmy Malone, Baltimore Democrat, as she plants a kiss on his cheek. The gestures and words of a mother, surely. Meet Miss Peg, House Mother to the lawmakers. For 35 years, as the designated host for resident lawmakers at the Historic Inns of Annapolis, she has served soup to the sick, located oversized desks for the workaholics, rearranged furniture for the homesick, and listened carefully to everybody's take on the issues of the day. She knows her guests' party affiliations, their hometowns, the ages of their children and their preference in pillows.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2001
Paul M. Pearson II, an Annapolis developer who mixed jazz with historic preservation, died Saturday of complications from a stroke at FutureCare Chesapeake in Arnold. He was 76 and had lived in downtown Annapolis until 1995. Mr. Pearson's interests in jazz and in developing aged buildings in Maryland's capital came together in the early 1970s, when he opened King of France Tavern, a former employee locker room and beauty parlor in the basement of the Maryland Inn, and recruited the musicians who played there.
NEWS
September 9, 1994
It is human nature to dismiss challenges by saying, "It can't be done." And after someone overcomes the hurdles and does it, to be dismissive again and claim, "Anyone could have done it."When Paul Pearson first came to Annapolis in 1968, the Maryland capital was a sleepy town. It had a rich heritage but much of the historic district was deteriorated. Mr. Pearson took over a down-on-the-heels dowager of a hotel, Maryland Inn, and opened a jazz venue in the basement. The rest is history.While the revival of Annapolis has many parents, Mr. Pearson definitely was present at the rebirth.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
A manager fired from the Maryland Inn amid charges of racism has filed suit against the Maryland legislator he says ruined his reputation and got him fired.Jeb Bello, 24, was fired March 10 for "rudeness to guests" after an incident in which Del. Melony Ghee Griffith, an African-American from Prince George's County, said she and her companion, a constituent, were denied service, treated badly and told to wait even though tables were open and a white couple was seated.The incident galvanized many state legislators and Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who threatened to boycott the popular Annapolis restaurant if action wasn't taken.
NEWS
March 14, 1999
Giving disabled an equal chance is not `inhumane'My husband is physically disabled. He recently obtained a job as a "sign walker" for a store that is going out of business.He is a conscientious worker and has chosen to work regardless of the weather conditions.On March 6, he went to work in the rain. The store received calls from people complaining about the "inhumane" way they were treating a man with a disability.I am sure these calls were made by well-meaning people. However, they put the store in a position where they may no longer be able to employ him.He has gained so much more from this job than a paycheck.
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