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By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
The House of Delegates will cast a final vote today on Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed bill repealing the death penalty in Maryland. A series of test votes Wednesday night indicated the measure is almost certain to pass. House approval will send the bill to the governor for his signature. The Senate voted 27-20 for repeal last week. If the repeal is approved, Maryland would become the 18th state in the nation to abolish capital punishment. mdresser@baltsun.com
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Daniel W. Hubers, a retired real estate broker who was also a competitive sailor, died Saturday at Franklin Square Medical Center of heart failure. The lifelong Middle River resident was 96. The son of Anton Hubers, an optometrist, and Anna Hubers, a homemaker, Daniel Weber Hubers was born and raised on Weber Avenue in Essex. He was a 1936 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and attended what is now Loyola University Maryland, where he was a pre-med student. Mr. Hubers graduated from the University of Baltimore School of Law but never took the Maryland bar examination.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
The House of Delegates voted Wednesday to give Maryland one of the toughest gun laws in the nation, passing a bill that would ban the sale of assault-type weapons, set a 10-bullet limit on magazines and require fingerprints and a license to buy a handgun. Delegates altered the Senate's bill during more than 10 hours of emotional floor debate that lasted over two days. Key lawmakers said they expect the differences to be resolved quickly and the legislation sent to Gov. Martin O'Malley for his promised signature.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Joseph F. Nawrozki III, a retired investigative reporter who served on the staff of three Baltimore daily newspapers and was a Vietnam War combat veteran, died of leukemia Saturday at his Bel Air home. He was 70. "Joe had a real instinct for the underdog. He looked into their hearts," said Michael Olesker, a former Baltimore Sun columnist who was Mr. Nawrozki's investigative partner at the old News American. "His working-class background and his experience in Vietnam informed everything he wrote.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 16, 2014
The new $30 million Maryland House Travel Plaza along I-95 near Aberdeen will officially open to the public by midnight Thursday, according to the Maryland Transportation Authority and plaza manager Areas USA. Around 6 p.m., last-minute details were being taken care of, such as placing signs and moving construction barrels, Cheryl Sparks of the Maryland Transportation Authority said Thursday evening. The new plaza could open earlier than midnight, depending when those details are finished, she said.
NEWS
September 14, 2012
The take-away from your article about the closing of Maryland House was that both the Maryland Transportation Authority and Areas USA are centered on short-term greed ("After nearly half a century, Maryland House to close its doors," Sept. 7). The MTA's greed is money-centric, while Areas USA's greed is people- and culture-centric. The new Maryland House will be smaller because, as the MTA's Harold Bartlett explained in the article, "we're getting two new facilities without spending state money.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
The House of Delegates gave preliminary approval Wednesday to legislation that would raise Maryland's minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10, rejecting a flurry of amendments offered by opponents. The action clears the way for a final House vote on the measure Friday. Votes on amendments indicated that proponents of the increase - a top priority of Gov. Martin O'Malley - have more than enough votes to pass the bill and send it to the Senate. Opponents focused on a controversial provision exempting seasonal amusement parks such as Six Flags in Prince George's County from the wage increase, charging that would create an unfair break for one type of company.
EXPLORE
September 11, 2012
Back in 2005, a manager at the Starbucks Coffee shop at the Maryland House Rest Stop on I-95 just south of the Aberdeen exit told an Aegis reporter that particular Starbucks was one of the busiest in the world. It would be easy to chalk the claim up to hyperbole, exaggeration or the inexperience of a possibly not-so-worldly coffee shop manager, but anyone who has done a little research on the subject knows the claim is far from wild. Going back years before that, Marriott, the food service giant that has the restaurant contract for the Maryland House and many other rest stops across the country, also confirmed the Harford County rest stop is among the busiest.
EXPLORE
September 6, 2012
The Maryland House Travel Plaza on I-95 near Aberdeen will close for reconstruction on Sept. 15 for at least a year, the Maryland Transportation Authority said Thursday. When the Maryland House closes at midnight on Saturday, Sept. 15, the Chesapeake House Travel Plaza near North East in Cecil County will remain open for business, with a full complement of new food concepts opening in phases through early October, MDTA said in a news release. Food service, however, will be limited the week of Sept.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | September 20, 2012
Art has an uneasy relationship with the world of commercial enterprise. Commercial artists aren't necessarily held in high regard as they're often charged with tasks like devising nondescript images to hang in the food consumption areas of fast food joints. Then again, Andy Warhol, whose reputation has remained solid long after his death, was a commercial artist of sorts; his rather high volume studio was famously known as "The Factory. " Others, however, have maintained great art must be associated with great suffering, often the kind of suffering that comes from being a starving artist.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
Providing incentives to our best teachers to instruct our students with the greatest needs will improve these children's education. Rewarding teachers for their exceptional efforts in improving outcomes for these students will help keep them in the classroom ( "Time to talk tenure," Aug. 24). We already do that in Maryland. A teacher with the highest performance evaluation rating for classroom work can be assisted in the repayment of academic debt with a Nancy Grasmick Teacher Award.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
Raymond A. Skinner, one of the original members of Gov. Martin O'Malley's Cabinet, will retire at the end of this month, the governor's office announced Friday. O'Malley appointed Skinner, 67, as secretary of housing and community development in 2007, shortly after taking office. It was the second go-round for Skinner, who previously served as housing secretary from 1999 to 2003 under Gov. Parris N. Glendening. Skinner was known for his involvement in the administration's efforts to add to the state's stock of affordable housing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
When Emmy Award nominations were announced last month, two Maryland-made series were front and center in the news. HBO's “Veep” and the Netflix drama “House of Cards” made the short list for best comedy and drama, respectively, with a pack of other nominations for writers, directors and stars. Almost all the coverage - mine included - was about Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright. But there were other nominations announced at the same time in the creative arts category - nominations that didn't get nearly as much attention.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
A second newly constructed travel plaza along Interstate 95 in Maryland opened early Tuesday morning, about six weeks ahead of schedule, according to the Maryland Transportation Authority. The opening of the new $26 million, 30,000-square-foot Chesapeake House in Cecil County follows the January opening of the new Maryland House in Harford County. The state redesigned and rebuilt both travel plazas under a public-private partnership with Areas USA, which invested $56 million in the projects in exchange for operating rights through 2047.
NEWS
By Hal Riedl | July 20, 2014
Back when Robert Ehrlich was governor of Maryland, I was interviewing men newly committed to state prison and suspected of gang affiliations. After years in denial, Maryland was just beginning to realize that gangs were very active behind the walls. Among them was a "new" incarnation of BGF (Black Guerrilla Family) that had taken its name from, but was not otherwise beholden to, the BGF that dated from the 1960s. I got to know Lt. Santiago Morales, an astute gang investigator at Baltimore City Detention Center, and we shared information.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
Marylanders seeking health care will still be protected from illegal conduct when they enter a health care facility even though the Massachusetts Reproductive Health Care Facilities Act was found unconstitutional by the Supreme Court last week. Our law prohibits conduct with the intent to prevent an individual from entering or exiting a medical facility by physically "detaining the individual or obstructing, impeding, or hindering the individual's passage. " This legislation, enacted in 1989, is not limited to reproductive health care facilities as was the Massachusetts law, and it explicitly excludes speech from the actions that are illegal.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
As a newborn, Elyssa Baxter was brought home to her family's restored log house in McLean, Va. Seventy-two years later, not only would she and her husband own a similar restored log home in Parkton, but they would be invited to take part in the 77th annual Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage, whose 2014 theme is "extraordinary historic properties. " "This home carries on a family tradition and the interest of my mother and father to own and maintain a log cabin," said Baxter, a former art teacher.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
At one minute past midnight on Sept. 16, a state landmark known by millions of motorists will go dark. Employees will say their goodbyes before the doors and off-ramps are barricaded at Maryland House, the Interstate 95 travel plaza in Harford County that opened in 1963. Within weeks, wrecking crews will level the neo-Georgian brick structure to make way for a new building, the flagship of an ambitious public-private partnership valued at a half-billion dollars. The same night, the smaller Chesapeake House in Cecil County will change as new vendors replace old ones.
NEWS
By Isaac Howley | June 25, 2014
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Surgeon General's report on the harms of smoking, which launched anti-tobacco public health efforts that have saved an estimated 8 million American lives. We are today a far more educated public when it comes to the dangers of cigarette use. Yet a bill in the Maryland House of Delegates that would treat e-cigarettes like normal cigarettes, and thus ban their use in public buildings, was roundly defeated this year. The bill didn't even make it out of committee.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | June 12, 2014
Editor: Maryland's Primary Election is coming soon, June 24. I support the re-election of Delegate Glen Glass to the Maryland House of Delegates. During the past four years, he has served and represented his constituents of Harford and Cecil counties during a very profound and difficult time in our state's history. As a State Delegate, he has had great admiration for his district and constituents! This dedication to serving his constituents has enabled him to sponsor more bills than any other delegate in the Harford County Delegation.
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