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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
In another time, Maryland was a hotbed for horse racing, its history rich and its purses comparable to other states. It was a place where jockeys could make a career and not have to contemplate leaving for New York or California. Since the late 1980s, and maybe longer, being an up-and-coming rider at Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park has been akin to being a burgeoning major league star at Camden Yards. Bigger markets — with longer racing seasons and more lucrative purses — beckon.
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NEWS
May 16, 2013
The Kentucky Derby winner and oddsmakers' favorite for the Preakness Stakes isn't exactly a Maryland horse, but he's close - Orb is partially owned by a Baltimore County businessman, and his sire spent some time in Harford County. Attendance at Saturday's races might or might not set an all-time record, but it's bound to be close - top-flight music acts, it seems, are a bigger draw than BYOB debauchery. The weather may not be perfect, but it will be close - the latest forecast is for a high of 72 but with a slight chance of showers.
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NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2003
Gerald "Jerry" Frutkoff, an award-winning Maryland horse racing photographer who chronicled the running of the Preakness Stakes for 55 years, died Friday of cancer and kidney disease at the Joseph Richey Hospice in Baltimore. The Mount Airy resident was 81. Mr. Frutkoff's pictures graced the pages of Life, The Saturday Evening Post and Sports Illustrated. For parts of seven decades, he prowled the tracks at Pimlico, Laurel Park and Bowie, camera in hand, capturing the essence of the sport -- from starting gate spills to spectacular stretch runs.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Dale Capuano winced at the sight of the 10 or so people watching the horse race at Laurel Park as he walked from the paddock into the 3,000-seat grandstand. Most were familiar faces. Out on the track, his filly, Calcutta Cat, reeled from a rough break — the horse next to her veered left sharply coming out of the gate — and finished sixth of eight horses. She was the only Maryland-bred horse in the race. Only 19 of the 80 horses entered in races that day had been foaled in Maryland.
NEWS
November 29, 2001
THE MARYLAND Racing Commission's approval of a new racetrack in Allegany County will further handicap an already hobbled industry in this state. The award of a license to two members of the powerful William Rickman family for the small track near Little Orleans was based on politics, not on good economics or the betterment of the sport. Thank House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr., Del. John A. Hurson (chairman of the House Environmental Matters Committee) and even Gov. Parris Glendening for the decision.
NEWS
By Brad Lyman | June 10, 2005
THE CANADIAN owner of Pimlico is threatening to move the Preakness unless the state grants it substantial slot machine largess. Marylanders are told that Pimlico is profitable only one day a year, so slot machines are required to subsidize Maryland horse racing. Most of the partiers in the Preakness infield last month didn't come for the race, so let's stipulate that horse racing is unprofitable 365 days each year. It has not always been so. In the 19th century, Maryland depended on horses and sailing vessels.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
A state study commission agreed yesterday to recommend that legislators continue helping the Maryland horse racing industry through trying, competitive times. But the commission did not reveal how much assistance it would recommend.That will be decided during private deliberations among commissioners in the next two or three weeks, said Stuart S. Janney III, who heads the commission on the horse racing industry.Based on recommendations of the commission last year, the General Assembly passed and Gov. Parris N. Glendening signed a subsidy package that included $8 million for thoroughbred and standardbred purses and $1.5 million for marketing.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | March 28, 2009
Attorneys for Maryland are asking a federal judge to affirm the state's claim to the Preakness Stakes amid concern in Annapolis that current bankruptcy proceedings could invalidate a law designed to keep the historic horse race in Baltimore. In filings Friday, lawyers for the state asked the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware to order the bankrupt Magna Entertainment Corp. - which is trying to sell its Maryland horse racing assets, including the Preakness - to comply with a Maryland law giving the state the right to match any accepted bid to buy the second leg of the Triple Crown.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1996
The first concrete indication of the negative effects slot-machine gambling in Delaware will have on Maryland horse racing came yesterday.Today's reopening of Rosecroft Raceway in Prince George's County was marred considerably when only 48 horses were entered for the harness track's first Saturday program of the year."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer Staff writer William Thompson contributed to this article | August 21, 1993
Maryland horse racing and breeding officials are issuing dire warnings about the "absolutely catastrophic" impact on their industry of proposed casino gambling in the District of Columbia.But the State Lottery Agency, while conceding that a gaming parlor in the nation's capital could initially hurt lottery sales in the state, predicted no significant long-term impact.A spokeswoman for Washington Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly confirmed yesterday that casino gambling was among the options being considered by city officials as a way to finance a new downtown convention center.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | May 18, 2012
My earliest recollection of the television that arrived in my family's Guilford Avenue home was the broadcast of the 1955 Preakness. We were all fixed on that black-and-white Sylvania mounted high on a wall. Nashua beat Swaps and went on to win the Belmont, too. Nashua was named 1955 Horse of the Year and later bred to many other winners. A number of the horses competing at Pimlico today are his descendants. Not long after that 1955 Preakness, my mother guided me through the recently opened Woodward wing of the Baltimore Museum of Art , where I was dazzled by the portraits of thoroughbred horses and of a tall and distinguished gentleman, William "Billy" Woodward, Nashua's owner.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
In another time, Maryland was a hotbed for horse racing, its history rich and its purses comparable to other states. It was a place where jockeys could make a career and not have to contemplate leaving for New York or California. Since the late 1980s, and maybe longer, being an up-and-coming rider at Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park has been akin to being a burgeoning major league star at Camden Yards. Bigger markets — with longer racing seasons and more lucrative purses — beckon.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Maryland horse racing got exposed for a lack of oversight Tuesday during an appeal to have the Rick Dutrow-trained King and Crusader reinstated as the winner of the $75,000 Maryland Juvenile Championship at Laurel Park. Dutrow and his horse's owner James Riccio lost the appeal, but Maryland horse racing may have lost more, as officials at Laurel Park were found to have not followed all of the proper procedures on the night of that December race. "I'm stabled at Laurel Park," said John Robb, the trainer of Glib, the second-place finisher who was declared the winner of the Juvenile Championship.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
Maryland horse racing may be on shaky ground, but Laurel Park in winter is still appealing to a number of trainers from outside the state. With the 48-day winter meet set to begin at Laurel Park on Jan. 4, and the weather growing colder up north, Laurel appears to be a popular haven. Twenty-five new trainers have brought their horses here, which is more than in years past. "The New England boys have been coming here for years, after their tracks' seasons end," Maryland Jockey Club racing secretary Georganne Hale said.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
Maryland horsemen learned Monday afternoon they'd have to wait longer for a definitive answer on the state's racing dates for the 2012 season. "We've had productive meetings," said John McDaniel, a member of the Maryland Racing Commission who has spearheaded the discussions. "Both parties have entered the dialogue with desire to reach an agreement. " But no agreement has been reached, and the Maryland Jockey Club has not put in a request for any racing dates. Tracks often ask for 365 days as a way to meet the Dec. 1 deadline and request specific live dates later.
NEWS
By Ron Fritz, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
Bill Boniface of Bonita Farms in Darlington won the 1983 Preakness with Deputed Testamony. He remembers the buzz his horse created during the week leading into the race and after the victory. He can't wait for the 2011 Preakness in two weeks now that trainer Graham Motion's Animal Kingdom, a horse based in Fair Hill, Md., won the Kentucky Derby Saturday. "I think it will be a plus for Maryland, and, as you well know, we need some good news," Boniface said Saturday. "It's going to add excitement for the local trainers.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | April 15, 2004
IT'S TRIPLE CROWN season, and the mood in this second-jewel city is, how shall we say, interesting. Who'll win the Kentucky Derby, then sweep into Baltimore with all the hype and expectations worthy of those 101,000 spectators and NBC's live broadcast? Of course, the Preakness will be run May 15 at Pimlico. It's one of the oldest sporting traditions in the country, put on by the oldest sports club in America - the Maryland Jockey Club, which dates to 1743. That doesn't mean there's not a frustrated constituency starting to wonder if Maryland doesn't need a serious dose of shock treatment.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2002
Maryland horse racing will begin receiving about $4.5 million in purse money from the state sometime after July 1, as stipulated in a bill adopted last week as part of the state budget. Racing leaders aren't sure how the money will be dispersed. All they know is that it will be available during the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2002, and ending June 30, 2003. "It's about half of the old purse supplement," said Tom Chuckas Jr., chief executive officer of Rosecroft Raceway, the harness track in Prince George's County.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
Spring brings renewal, and that was the feeling among some horsemen Wednesday, when the Maryland Jockey Club released a Pimlico spring stakes schedule that includes the return of the Grade III Allaire duPont Distaff on Preakness Day and a $100,000 boost to the purse for the day before's Grade II Black-Eyed Susan Stakes. The MJC unveiled the stakes schedule after reaching agreement with the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association and Maryland Horse Breeders Association. All that remains is for the Maryland Racing Commission to approve it Feb. 15 at its monthly meeting at Laurel Park.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | November 30, 2010
The best spin you can give Frank Stronach is that he has good intentions but makes bad deals with inappropriate partners — people who seem more interested in slot-machine riches than in the thoroughbred racing he loves. To get Joseph De Francis and associates to sell him Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park, Stronach agreed to give them millions in future slot-machine profits — if and when slots came to the tracks. Stronach then spent years trying to renegotiate the deal — a strange focus for someone who kept saying horse racing didn't need slots.
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