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Maryland Historical Trust

NEWS
April 24, 1991
The Historical Society of Carroll County will receive one of five state awards in Annapolis next month for outstanding work in historical preservation.The society will be cited by the Maryland Historical Trust for authenticity in restoring the Sherman-Fisher-Shellman House in Westminster and for the accompanying research into the history of architecture in Maryland.The house, built in 1807, is the society's flagship house museum. The project to restore it began in 1983 with money raised through the state, businesses and individuals.
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NEWS
September 12, 1990
Gov. William Donald Schaefer recently announced the Maryland Main Street Designation Program to recognize small towns committed to revitalization.Each year, the program, through a competitive process, will designate roads in several communities as "Maryland Main Streets" to applaud the towns' hard work in maintaining their commercial and historical heritage.The program, administered by the Community Assistance Agency of the Department of Housing and Community Development, will involve a number of state agencies.
NEWS
May 28, 1991
"The Maryland Black Experience as Understood Through Archaeology," astudy of daily life for Black Annapolitans in the late 1800s and early 1900s, is running at the Banneker-Douglas Museum, 84 Franklin St.,Annapolis, through June 29. The public is invited, and admission is free.After that, part of the exhibit will be seen at the Shiplap House Museum on 18 Pinkney St. until Oct. 31.Using photographs and maps of the period, the exhibit features a sampling of items owned and used by the black population and oral histories collected from families who lived at Franklin and Cathedral streets.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | January 5, 1995
County school officials are getting a history lesson as they plan for the future of Elmer Wolfe Elementary School in Union Bridge.The historical significance of the school building will determine whether the county renovates it or razes it to build a new school.County school officials want to demolish the Elmer Wolfe building and are seeking additional state money for the construction of a new school.But the Maryland Historical Trust has not approved the demolition. The agency's approval is required to destroy any building that is more than 50 years old if the project is to receive state money.
NEWS
September 19, 1991
The Lady Maryland Foundation, the Maryland Historical Trust and the Maryland Sail Dredgers Association have announced a plan to raise $1 million to save the last 25 working historic skipjacks.The campaign kicks off Nov. 2, with a fund-raiser hosted by the foundation and featuring guest speakers Charles Kuralt and Gov. William Donald Schaefer. To be held at Stouffer's in the Inner Harbor, the event will feature four regional cuisines, three bands, and a 600-person guest list that includes watermen, corporate VIPs, celebrities, preservationists, historians, environmentalists and educators.
NEWS
July 21, 2000
A major restoration of late 18th-century buildings at Hancock's Resolution is scheduled to begin next week and expected to last about four months. The work at the historic Pasadena farm site is to be performed by Worcester Eisenbrandt Inc., a Baltimore-based company specializing in historic preservation projects, following designs by the architectural firm Mesick, Cohen, Wilson and Baker of Albany, N.Y. The site on Bayside Beach Road, about 2.5 miles...
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1994
CROWNSVILLE -- Indian leaders argued yesterday the fine points of regulations designed to implement the return of Indian remains to the proper descendants for reburial.The Maryland Historical Trust, a state agency, has been trying for two years to craft regulations in support of a state law passed in 1992 that would "repatriate" the remains to their lineal or cultural descendants.The law also provides for scientific study that would be "of benefit to Maryland."The trust has bones and bone fragments of about 80 Indians collected through the years for study.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2004
Fresh red and gray paint has been applied and a new slate roof and a distinctive brick chimney have been rebuilt, although plywood still covers the windows of the 1912 Hampstead train station. A lot of restoration work remains to be done on the station, which once was a stop for passengers on the Western Maryland Railroad's "Old Dutch Line" from Glyndon to Hanover, Pa. But after more than six years of work, a local official who spearheaded the renovation is predicting a spring ceremonial opening for the building as a museum and visitors center.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1998
Seminar to explore incentives for buying a home in BaltimoreThe Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors and the Baltimore Department of Housing and Community Development will present a briefing on the home-buying incentive programs available in the city from 9 a.m. to noon Friday on the 13th floor of 417 E. Fayette St.Called "Tour of Baltimore City: In Action," the event will include information on the Settlement Expense Loan Program, Live Near Your Work, Buy...
NEWS
December 23, 2007
ISSUE: -- The Maryland Stadium Authority recently recommended demolishing or moving a 19th-century home in downtown Annapolis to make way for an estimated $20 million National Sailing Hall of Fame. Its long-awaited report said that trying to incorporate the modest house, one of the original pieces of the waterfront streetscape and now used as office space for the Department of Natural Resources Police, would be too challenging. Lee Tawney, executive director of the National Sailing Hall of Fame, said his group is consulting with the Maryland Historical Trust on the best way to move forward on plans to develop the site, while respecting its historic nature.
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