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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
The Maryland Historical Society can thank document thief Barry H. Landau for some recent additions to its collection. Landau's capture at the Baltimore institution sparked a multistate investigation that ended in his conviction for stealing 10,000 "objects of cultural heritage" from museums and historical societies all along the East Coast. But two years after his guilty plea, federal investigators say they still can't find rightful homes for more than 10 percent of those pieces.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Karen A. Stuart, a Library of Congress archivist who earlier had been head librarian at the Maryland Historical Society where she also was associate editor of the Maryland Historical Magazine, died of cancer Aug. 19 at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 59. "As head librarian at the Maryland Historical Society, Karen always took her job seriously, trying hard to help researchers who sometimes had fairly arcane questions of projects," said Robert J. Brugger, an author and Maryland historian who is a senior editor at the Johns Hopkins University Press.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 14, 1999
It was a truly royal reception at the Maryland Historical Society's 1999 Antiques Show Gala Preview Party. More than 400 antiques lovers perused roomfuls of collectible treasures and toured the exhibit "Wallis: Duchess of Windsor," while enjoying a buffet fit for a king.Meanwhile, the king of costume-jewelry designers, Kenneth Jay Lane, held court with his fans. As he playfully toyed with a long string of pearls worn by board member Barbara Katz, she told Lane, "They're yours ... 1961!"Others in attendance at the party included society board president Stan Klinefelter; director Dennis Fiori; board member Stiles Colwill; event chair Carolyn O'Keefe; committee members Megan Wolfe, Blair White, Olive Waxter, Julia Keelty and Marcy Sagel; "Calloway" Brooks, musician; Lou Van Dyck, CFO of New Enterprise Associates; Katie O'Hare, Baltimore-based actress; Dr. Dolores Njoku, Johns Hopkins pediatric anesthesiologist; Doug Becker, president of Sylvan Learning Systems; and Dick Horne, co-curator of the American Dime Museum.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Baltimore, home to the first received telegraph message (Samuel Morse, 1844, sent from Washington), the first umbrella factory in America (1828), the first Ouija board (1892) and - to note what really matters - the first baseball player to win MVP awards in both leagues (Frank Robinson, 1966) and the first Olympian to win eight gold medals in a single games ( Michael Phelps , 2008). As if that doesn't engender enough civic pride for any municipality, it seems Charm City, according to the Maryland Historical Society, can add another first to its list: birthplace of the American bicycle.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
They left the Maryland Historical Society tucked inside the coat pockets and notebooks of Barry Landau and his assistant, but the historical documents returned in manila envelopes, neatly packed inside a gray cardboard file box. Authorities continue to reunite more than 10,000 items "of cultural heritage" to museums and libraries along the East Coast that were targeted by Landau and his assistant Jason Savedoff. This month the Maryland Historical Society has received about one-third of 60 documents stolen.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | August 17, 1997
The Maryland Historical Society will temporarily close its exhibition "Baltimore, Inc.: From Mobtown to Charm City," Sept. 8-19, to add a selection of costumes, accessories and drawings from Baltimore's past. The items to be installed are from the society's permanent collection and will be exhibited for the first time."Baltimore, Inc." tells Baltimore City's history through objects, photographs and other ephemera. The exhibition is on display in the society's new 21,000-square-foot Heritage Gallery.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 9, 2006
Anita R. Nelson, a longtime volunteer and guide at the Maryland Historical Society who shared her enthusiasm for the state's history with visitors, died of heart failure March 2 at her Timonium home. She was 81. Born Anita Marguerite Ross in Seattle, she was raised there and in Spokane and Wenatchee, Wash. She moved to Pasadena, Calif., and earned an associate's degree from Pasadena Junior College in 1944. She was studying to become a registered nurse when she fell in love and married Edmund Allen Nelson, a Marine Corps pilot from Cambridge.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2002
P. William Filby, former director of the Maryland Historical Society and an authority on "The Star-Spangled Banner," died of a stroke Nov. 2 at Laurel Regional Hospital. He was 90 and lived in Savage. Mr. Filby was born and raised in Cambridge, England. After attending the Cambridge and County High School, he joined the Cambridge University Library, working in its rare-book division. After volunteering for the British army in 1940, he later transferred to the British Intelligence Corps as a member of the cryptographic team at Bletchley, England, where Germany's ULTRA code was broken.
NEWS
April 6, 1997
THE FISCAL crunch that threatens to close the Baltimore City Life Museums shows that there are just too many local history museums with overlapping focus. The philanthropic and business communities simply cannot support all of them. For years, some experts have been predicting mergers and consolidations.The Maryland Historical Society has scheduled a meeting Wednesday to explore whether it can help ease the City Life Museums' crisis. The society is particularly concerned that if City Life is forced to sell its collection of paintings by Rembrandt Peale, the works should remain in Maryland.
NEWS
December 19, 1997
THE MARYLAND Historical Society is the big winner in the liquidation of the Baltimore City Life Museums, which was forced to padlock its doors June 21.It will add to the society's collection 58 paintings by members of the Rembrandt Peale family, thus becoming the biggest repository of Peale art anywhere. The historical society will also acquire and display in its Mount Vernon buildings the rest of the City Life memorabilia.That's the good news. The bad news is that the future of various City Life buildings is uncertain -- the Shot Tower, H. L. Mencken's rowhouse, the Peale Museum, Carroll Mansion and a renovated iron building named just last year in honor of the late Morton K. Blaustein.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
For longer than the U.S. has been a nation, Marylanders have been horse people. George Washington raced thoroughbred horses in Annapolis in the 1750s, 100 years after the animals were first introduced to the area. A statue of Casimir Pulaski, a Polish soldier who assisted in the founding of the American cavalry during the Revolutionary War, stands in Patterson Park. The Preakness Stakes has been run since 1875. In the 1900s, lifeguards patrolled the shores of Ocean City on horseback, looking for shipwrecks and lost swimmers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
Thomas D. Washburne Sr., a partner in the Baltimore law firm of Ober/Kaler whose specialty was estate planning, died Tuesday of an unknown neurological disorder at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 86. The son of Hempstead Washburne, a lawyer, and Mary Dennehy Washburne, a homemaker, Thomas Dennehy Washburne was born and raised in Lake Forest, Ill. After graduating in 1945 from the Taft School in Watertown, Conn., he earned a bachelor's degree in 1949 from Princeton University. In 1952, he earned his law degree from the University of Virginia and came to Baltimore to clerk for Judge William C. Coleman, chief judge of the U.S. District Court.
NEWS
By Quinn Kelley, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
When Tuesday's Maryland Day ceremony was relocated to the Baltimore Basilica because of the snow, several speakers noted the significance of the location. As the first Catholic cathedral in the country, in a state with a history of religious tolerance, some said it was the ideal place to gather. "It's extremely significant to people in Maryland," but also to people across the country, said Mortimer Newlin Stead Sellers, University of Baltimore School of Law professor, after the ceremony.
NEWS
Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Some things just naturally go together, like peanut butter and jelly. This summer, Francis Scott Key's original manuscript for "The Star-Spangled Banner" - America's national anthem - will be reunited for the first time with the flag that inspired it. "The National Museum of American History is proud to be the home of the iconic Star-Spangled Banner, the flag that inspired Francis Scott Key in 1814 to write passionate lyrics after the relentless...
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Brace yourself for a big swig of history, Baltimore. The Comedy Central show "Drunk History," which features spifflicated storytellers recounting great moments in our nation's past, will be filming at Mother's Federal Hill Grille on Thursday night. Lutherville native Derek Waters will be returning to his hometown to film this episode of the show, which was an online sensation before being picked up by Comedy Central in 2012. The show, which starts its second season this year, features famous actors reenacting history as told by the inebriated narrators.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
The Maryland Historical Society can thank document thief Barry H. Landau for some recent additions to its collection. Landau's capture at the Baltimore institution sparked a multistate investigation that ended in his conviction for stealing 10,000 "objects of cultural heritage" from museums and historical societies all along the East Coast. But two years after his guilty plea, federal investigators say they still can't find rightful homes for more than 10 percent of those pieces.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 14, 1997
In "Baltimore, Inc.," opening today at the Maryland Historical Society, you can mingle with ladies in ankle-length dresses at the 1913 Flower Mart on Charles Street; pose for a daguerreotype at an 1840s Baltimore Street photography studio; embark on a paddle-wheeler from Pratt Street around 1910; cruise the Howard Street theater district at the turn of the century.And you can watch the Baltimore Fire of 1904 with Mary Dorsey Davis, who painted the scene from the third floor of her house in Bolton Hill.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Lady Baltimore's moving plans have changed. Once she comes down from her 190-year perch atop the Battle Monument overlooking Courthouse Square - the scaffolding is up and the project is underway - she will take up a new, indoor residence at the Maryland Historical Society Museum and Library in Mount Vernon, society officials said. An earlier plan to relocate the marble statue, which honors the Battle of North Point and the bombardment of Fort McHenry in 1814, had called for it to be relocated to the Walters Art Museum , but Lady Baltimore was too heavy for the museum's floors.
SPORTS
By Ellen Fishel, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Henry Stansbury is pure Maryland. His family has been here since the 1650s. He grew up in Mount Washington, played lacrosse for the Terps in the early 1960s and now splits his time between his houses in Catonsville and on the Eastern Shore. And his love for the state and its history also led him to one of his greatest passions - decoy collecting. Hand-carved decoys, once used for waterfowl hunting and now appreciated as art, have a rich history in the Chesapeake Bay region.
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