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NEWS
April 21, 2014
The Sun, in its recent article about Maryland Ready, the state's four-year plan for postsecondary education, points out the complexity of raising the number of Marylanders with college degrees to 55 percent by 2025 ( "New state higher-education plan addresses changing demographics of students," April 9). In a more recent editorial ( "The 55 percent solution," April 14), it reiterates that point and suggests that the plan lacks the specifics needed to turn the goal into reality.
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NEWS
April 21, 2014
The Sun, in its recent article about Maryland Ready, the state's four-year plan for postsecondary education, points out the complexity of raising the number of Marylanders with college degrees to 55 percent by 2025 ( "New state higher-education plan addresses changing demographics of students," April 9). In a more recent editorial ( "The 55 percent solution," April 14), it reiterates that point and suggests that the plan lacks the specifics needed to turn the goal into reality.
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NEWS
June 3, 2013
Anne Neal's recent commentary ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30) seeks to conflate two separate issues into a unified insight about the pending collapse of America's higher education system. Her effort merits a failing grade. Yes, St. Mary's College of Maryland has suffered an "off" admission year, yielding fewer students than expected and budgeted for, but to argue that the shortfall is the result of admissions prospects rejecting the college's curriculum as having, in her words, "dubious educational value" is a stretch too far. While I sympathize with some perspectives espoused by her organization, the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, it is disingenuous to exploit an institution's temporary setback as an opportunity to advance the council's agenda.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
The body overseeing higher education in Maryland unveiled a new four-year plan Wednesday intended to help serve the low-income, first-generation and nontraditional students that make up a growing segment of the academic population. The Maryland Higher Education Commission's plan is also meant to push the state toward Gov. Martin O'Malley's goal of increasing the proportion of college-educated Marylanders to 55 percent by 2025. "We realize that in order to have the workforce that we need to meet the demands of our economy … we have to look beyond those students who have traditionally comprised our graduation cohorts," said Maryland Higher Education Secretary Danette G. Howard.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
The body overseeing higher education in Maryland unveiled a new four-year plan Wednesday intended to help serve the low-income, first-generation and nontraditional students that make up a growing segment of the academic population. The Maryland Higher Education Commission's plan is also meant to push the state toward Gov. Martin O'Malley's goal of increasing the proportion of college-educated Marylanders to 55 percent by 2025. "We realize that in order to have the workforce that we need to meet the demands of our economy … we have to look beyond those students who have traditionally comprised our graduation cohorts," said Maryland Higher Education Secretary Danette G. Howard.
NEWS
January 31, 2005
Szablya is named to post for higher education board Helen Szablya of Ellicott City has been named director of communications for the Maryland Higher Education Commission. Most recently, she was public relations and marketing manager for the College Savings Plans of Maryland. Szablya was named one of Maryland's Top 100 Women in 1996 and 2001 in recognition of her professional work and civic involvement. The Maryland Higher Education Commission is a 12-member coordinating board responsible for establishing statewide policies for Maryland public and independent colleges and universities, and private career schools.
NEWS
August 23, 2001
Maryland is home to 30 cosmetology schools -- more than any other type of private career school (real estate schools are second with 28). The state's cosmetology schools had an an enrollment of 2,890 students in 1998-99. Fifty-nine percent of students completed completed their course work, and 69 percent of those became cosmetologists. Source: Maryland Higher Education Commission Private Career Schools Report, 1999
NEWS
February 13, 1991
The Maryland Higher Education Commission will begin examining today a proposal to turn a Rockville trade school into a college.Although the college would offer the equivalent of a junior and senior year at a four-year institution, some officials have cited concerns about standards, student diversity, existing competition and prudence in light of the state of the economy.
NEWS
June 24, 2002
Grants are available for students seeking degrees in physical and occupational therapy fields from the Maryland Higher Education Commission. The maximum annual award is $2,000. The grants may be used for tuition, fees, room and board, and books. Applicants must be Maryland residents and enrolled as degree-seeking students in a professional physical therapy or occupational therapy, physical therapy assistant or occupational therapy assistant program that leads to a state license. Applicants must agree to work full time with disabled children.
NEWS
November 8, 2013
No wonder there is no money for education ( "State didn't give out $17 million in need-based scholarships, auditors say," Nov. 6). The state spent $68.5 million last year on a scholarship program and serviced 27,000 students. The article stated that most students only get $2,000 on average. The Sun has an opportunity for another article to investigate waste at Maryland Higher Education Commission. Guy Keith Salomon, Gwynn Oak - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com .
NEWS
June 3, 2013
Anne Neal's recent commentary ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30) seeks to conflate two separate issues into a unified insight about the pending collapse of America's higher education system. Her effort merits a failing grade. Yes, St. Mary's College of Maryland has suffered an "off" admission year, yielding fewer students than expected and budgeted for, but to argue that the shortfall is the result of admissions prospects rejecting the college's curriculum as having, in her words, "dubious educational value" is a stretch too far. While I sympathize with some perspectives espoused by her organization, the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, it is disingenuous to exploit an institution's temporary setback as an opportunity to advance the council's agenda.
NEWS
January 16, 1991
Carroll Community College officials said there are pros and cons to Gov. William Donald Schaefer's proposal to abolish the agency that oversees the state's community colleges."
EXPLORE
August 4, 2012
Heather Kelleher of Francis Scott Key High School and Don'a Martin of North Carroll High School were among 30 science teachers in Maryland who went to Frostburg State University last month for the Improving Teaching Quality Through Training Opportunities in Physics and Physical Science workshop. Middle and high school teachers participate to upgrade knowledge, learn to integrate technology into lessons and develop strategies. The workshop was funded through the Maryland Higher Education Commission.
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