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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | October 26, 2012
State health officials in an article in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association criticized the oversight of compounding pharmacies and said the facilities need to take more responsibility in protecting patients from tainted drugs. The article, which appeared first in Friday's online edition of the medical journal, comes as the country still reels from a national meningitis outbreak linked to tainted steroids from the New England Compounding Center in Massachusetts.
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HEALTH
September 12, 2014
Federal health officials have awarded $3.5 million in Affordable Care Act funds to 14 community health centers in Maryland. The money will go to hire 60 new workers, expand hours and increase access to primary care. The money will also go to expand services to include dental care, mental health services, prescription drug coverage and vision services. The money is expected to provide care to more than 20,000 new patients around the state. See the list of centers receiving grants here . Around the nation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded $295 million to 1,195 centers with ore than 9,000 sites.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and C. Fraser Smith and Jonathan Bor and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
Maryland Health Secretary Dr. Martin P. Wasserman resigned yesterday, apparently pressured by legislators who criticized him for poor oversight of key health programs.Gov. Parris N. Glendening, who announced the resignation at a Cabinet meeting, said Wasserman will lead a new public health effort to combat smoking. Wasserman, in office for four years, will leave at the end of the month and be succeeded by Dr. Georges C. Benjamin, a deputy health secretary."We did accept Marty Wasserman's resignation this morning," Glendening said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
The medical system that provides care to Maryland's veterans signed a one-year contract with Evergreen Health Care in Baltimore to offer primary health services to new patients, federal and co-op officials said Thursday. The $485,000 contract aims to cut down on wait times that had become some of the worst in the nation. A June audit found Central Maryland's veterans were waiting an average of 80 days to see a primary-care doctor for an initial visit, the fourth longest wait in the nation.
NEWS
By Kathy Bergren Smith and Kathy Bergren Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 3, 2003
Up a winding drive in Davidsonville, within a mile of U.S. 50, an electronic gate secures the Maryland Health Society's 100-acre compound. Ringing the pool, clubhouse and volleyball court are 20 cabins, half of which are privately owned, the rest owned by the club. A dirt road leads toward the Patuxent River, and recreational vehicles are tucked in the woods, which are threaded with hiking trails. A typical summer camp scene - aside from the dress code. This summer, the Maryland Health Society begins its 70th year as an outdoor nudist camp, remaining dedicated to its founding principle that nude recreation is healthy, relaxing and fun. "Right now, we are at the peak of quality in our membership," says Conrad Kohlheyer, 71, one of the oldest of the club's 70 members.
NEWS
By Capital News Service | May 3, 2009
WASHINGTON - Maryland ranked in the Top 20 states for a second year with the highest rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea and placed fourth for syphilis, according to the latest data from the Maryland health department. "We've been hovering in the top five [for syphilis] for the past few years," said Barbara Conrad, sexually transmitted disease prevention division chief for the Maryland Health Department, who expects 2008 data in the next month. Maryland ranked fifth for primary and secondary syphilis, second for congenital syphilis, 14th for chlamydia and 18th for gonorrhea in 2006.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1996
Hospitals have formed networks. Doctors have. Independent pharmacies have. And now it's nursing homes, in their new incarnation as "post-acute-care facilities."ManorCare Health Services, a Gaithersburg-based nursing behemoth, and Maryland Health Enterprises, which operates three nursing-rehabilitation centers in Maryland under the Lorien Nursing and Rehabilitation name, yesterday announced the formation of the Mid Atlantic Post Acute Network (MAPAN), designed to seek managed care contracts.
NEWS
September 30, 2012
Maryland Health and Mental Hygiene Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein and his co-authors were right on the money in their recent commentary regarding the importance of making health care more affordable as the state goes about implementing federal health reform ("Caring about costs, too," Sept. 27). We at the Maryland Health Care For All! Coalition applaud his vision and embrace the opportunity to transform Maryland's health care system to reduce costs, improve health outcomes and achieve health equity.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
An Annapolis-based chain of mental health clinics said it will have to close its doors by Oct. 1 because of ongoing problems and delays in getting paid for its treatment of Medicaid patients. The Corner Clinic Inc., which operates five clinics in Anne Arundel, Caroline and St. Mary's counties, said yesterday that it is owed about $3 million in claims that have been either denied or held up because of paperwork errors. The resulting cash-flow problems will force the company to lay off its 150 employees and stop treating about 2,000 patients with chronic mental health problems, company officials said.
NEWS
September 28, 2002
An elderly Annapolis woman who died last week was infected with West Nile virus, Maryland health officials announced yesterday. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said tests on the 79-year-old, whose name has not been released, and on three other Maryland residents recently came back positive for the virus. There is no confirmation that the virus directly caused the woman's death. Health officials said she was admitted to a hospital Aug. 7 with encephalitis and died Sept.
HEALTH
By John Fritze and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Federal auditors looking into Maryland's flawed health insurance exchange are subpoenaing documents as part of their probe and have sought information from the lead contractor hired by the state to build the site. North Dakota-based Noridian Healthcare Solutions, the former prime contractor with a multimillion-dollar deal to design Maryland's online insurance marketplace, received a request for documents related to the project from the inspector general of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on July 30, the company's president said Tuesday.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
Maryland health exchange officials have been saying for months that everything is on track for a smooth launch of their new website, where residents can buy insurance under the Affordable Care Act. The thousands who had trouble enrolling on the last dysfunctional website may be skeptical, but they have no choice but to take the officials' word for it. Exchange officials have declined to release a new audit of their preparation, despite requests from...
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Maryland's health department has alerted state contractors caring for disabled adults and children that they are obligated to report incidents at their facilities that involve police, fire and medical assistance. The advisory - which comes as broader safeguards are being proposed by child advocates - was sent this week to nearly 300 professionals who work with disabled clients. Regulators said it was spurred by a recent Baltimore Sun investigation of an Anne Arundel County group home operator, LifeLine, which failed to notify regulators about numerous reports alleging abuse and neglect by its staff.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The Maryland health exchange reported Friday that more than 411,000 people had signed up for health insurance as of July 26, up more than 38,000 from a month ago. Open enrollment on the online marketplace is closed, but those who lost their coverage, got married or have another life event were still eligible to sign up. Also, those who qualify for Medicaid are allowed to sign up year-round. Most of those who gained coverage enrolled in Medicaid. The number reflects some who also were dropped from the program because they no longer qualify.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
Frustrated with her inability to get health insurance, Bonnita Spikes entered the political fray when she was featured in gubernatorial candidate Douglas F. Gansler's April radio ad lambasting Maryland's problem-fraught health exchange. But as irritated as she was with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act in Maryland, she's been much happier with the treatment she's received after she finally enrolled. Now Spikes has lent her voice to a publicity campaign praising the health reform effort.
NEWS
May 28, 2014
We at the Maryland Health Care For All Coalition, representing hundreds of faith, community, labor, business and health care groups from across Maryland, hope that when Attorney General Doug Gansler and the Republican candidates for governor criticize the "40 new taxes" enacted under the O'Malley administration they are not including in their criticism the life saving tobacco and alcohol tax increases approved in 2007, 2011 and 2012. The one-dollar per pack cigarette tax increase enacted in 2007, which Attorney General Gansler supported, has helped to reduce cigarette smoking by 32 percent in Maryland, almost double the national average, and by 40 percent among teens.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | November 27, 1992
A health-care service owned by a group of Maryland Shock Trauma Center physicians is seeking state approval to begin providing hospice services in Baltimore and five Central Maryland counties, including Carroll.Bay Area Health Care Inc., which is affiliated with the University of Maryland Medical Center, offers home care to patients leaving University Hospital.The corporation plans to add hospice care to its services.Julie Flaherty, executive director of Carroll Hospice, the existing volunteer hospice service, expressed concern that the proposed service might affect her organization's ability to raise money.
HEALTH
October 6, 2012
Maryland health officials on Saturday announced a third patient has developed meningitis in the state after receiving a steroid injection in September. More cases were found across the country, bringing the total to more than 60. The person is alive, but no additional information will be released about the case, said Dori Henry, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. This is the third Maryland case linked to methylprednisolone acetate that was produced and distributed by the New England Compounding Center.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Maryland Health Secretary Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein can add another educational accomplishment to his resume - a certificate of completion from the University of Maryland and the state attorney general's office for an online course on Maryland's Open Meetings Act. Sharfstein, a pediatrician who has a degree from Harvard Medical School, among others, volunteered for the extra schooling after the state's health exchange lawyers said someone on each...
NEWS
April 10, 2014
Regarding your recent article about the Maryland health exchange, why was there no mention of Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, the point man of this fiasco ( "Maryland lawmakers cautious about new health exchange," April 5)? I know failure has no daddy, but to totally omit Mr. Brown's name from such a report astounds me. If the man cannot oversee something like the state's health exchange how is he going to run the rest of the government? I am sure that if the exchange had worked half as well as we were told it would, Mr. Brown would be shouting it from the rooftops.
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