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NEWS
By LYN BACKE | May 8, 1995
Call it the nesting instinct -- nests can get pretty fetid over the winter -- or simply a weather window to get things done. The fact remains that spring cleaning of houses, garages, attics and cars happens. We all go at it with a vengeance, eliminating our cobwebs and gleaning from our stuff.Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts trustee Jean Melton hopes to take advantage of this immutable urge, recognizing that one person's discard is on someone else's wish list.She's heading a yard sale on the lawn of Maryland Hall on June 10 and looking now for sale items and volunteers to work before and during the event.
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FEATURES
By Christine L. Fillat | January 23, 1992
JUST ANNOUNCED: The Ellis Marsalis and Marcus Roberts evening of solo and duo piano originally advertised for March 15 will take place Feb. 15 at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St., Annapolis. Call (410) 263-5019.THE CAPITAL CENTRE, Landover: Dire Straits, Feb. 24. Call (410) 481-SEAT.MEYERHOFF SYMPHONY HALL, 1212 Cathedral St.: The Big Band Salute to Benny Goodman on Feb. 12; Mel Torme appears with Maureen McGovern on Feb. 25. Roberta Flack, Feb. 29. Call (410) 783-8000.
NEWS
By Lyn Backe and Lyn Backe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 1996
THE ANNUAL challenge of finding something worthwhile for children to do during the summer is with us again, and there are some very creative solutions.The Anne Arundel County Public Library, for instance, is recruiting middle-school students to help with the Summer Reading Program for younger children. The young mentors will organize and distribute packets of materials for program participants, help register children, restock book displays, help with craft projects and assist the library staff with special events.
NEWS
By BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF | November 4, 2005
Grammy Award-winning country music star Kathy Mattea's performance Sunday at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis has been canceled due to Mattea's laryngitis. The concert has been rescheduled for Jan. 19 at 7 p.m. Ticketholders may use their tickets then, or contact Maryland Hall about a refund: 410-263-5544 or email rdaubney@mdhallarts.org. November 4, 2005, 12:40 PM EST
NEWS
May 31, 1996
WHAT WOULD Anne Arundel County be without Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts? In the 17 years since the old Annapolis High School on Chase Street was converted into an arts center, it has become the county's cultural hub. It is home to the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra, Ballet Theatre of Annapolis and choral and opera companies. A branch of the Peabody Preparatory conducts classes and performs there.Linnell Bowen is about to become the new executive director of Maryland Hall at a critical juncture.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
Problem: The 68-year-old building that is home to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts and many of Annapolis' finest artists has drafty windows, water damage and an aged electrical system. Solution: A big party. Arts Alive 2, the hall's annual fund-raiser Saturday, will bring together patrons, artists, food, music and a tent full of art and goods for auction. Last year's sold-out gala, which ran for three days, raised $60,000, organizers said. This year's one-day event will include dinner by Outback Steakhouse, desserts by the Main Ingredient, dance performances by Kelly Isaac, music by Stef Scaggiari, Sue Matthews and Global Function, and an artsy yard sale.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | June 18, 1993
Anyone who's ever sweated through a May concert at Maryland Hall knows the old, poorly ventilated structure is no place to take in a concert during the summer.Acoustics -- don't even ask. The fraction of musical sound that makes it off the cavernous stage seems to head immediately for the nearest velour curtain to die. "Singing in Maryland Hall," conductor Ernest Green once told me, "is like singing into your sock."But the good news is that those who know and love the hall best -- its administrators and the talented performers who play, sing and dance there regularly -- are committed to its improvement.
NEWS
December 4, 1995
NORTHERN ANNE ARUNDEL County residents and their elected officials have long complained -- with justification -- that they never get amenities, only headaches. They get landfills instead of swimming pools, detention centers instead of arts centers. The good stuff usually ends up in well-heeled Annapolis and Central County. But the trend may be changing.Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary is turning out to be the best friend Glen Burnie ever had, working to bring an ice rink downtown and speed up the perennially delayed "Superblock" project.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 17, 1995
An old friend visits the Annapolis Symphony at Maryland Hall this weekend.Ruben Gonzalez, distinguished co-concertmaster of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and conductor and composer in his own right, comes to town to play the Beethoven Violin Concerto under Gisele Ben-Dor's baton, and to conduct a brief suite from his symphony "Dionisias and Lone Wolf."Mr. Gonzalez has appeared with the symphony twice before, soloing in the concertos of Mendelssohn and Tchaikovsky.Ms. Ben-Dor, the orchestra's music director, will round out the concerts Friday and Saturday with the splashy "Pictures at an Exhibition," composed by Modest Mussorgsky and orchestrated so colorfully by Maurice Ravel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur and Ann McArthur,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
In the span of an hour and a half on Sunday, the entire family can witness an ancient Chinese art form and provide aid for victims of the tsunami. But this deal comes with strings attached. At least 140 of them. The Quanzhou Marionette Troupe from the People's Republic of China will perform Sunday at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis, with all proceeds going to efforts to aid victims of the Indian Ocean tsunami disaster. The award-winning puppeteers will perform eight vignettes out of a repertoire of 700 traditional stories, legends, fairy tales and fables.
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