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Maryland General Hospital

NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | December 16, 2005
Two men died in weather-related accidents yesterday as cold air and a soggy storm system moving out of the Deep South combined to put a patchy glaze on area roads. In Bel Air, police said a 43-year-old Forest Hill resident, Clarence H. Carlos, was killed when he lost control of his car while turning from Route 24 onto U.S. 1 and was broadsided by another vehicle. In Baltimore, a man in his late 50s was killed after he lost control about 3:45 p.m. of his Chevrolet pickup truck while entering the southbound lanes of the Jones Falls Expressway from North Avenue, police said.
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NEWS
October 27, 2005
Md. General is to pay $173,600 Maryland General Hospital has agreed to pay $173,600 to settle allegations that it billed Medicare and Medicaid for laboratory tests of suspect accuracy, according to a settlement agreement that federal prosecutors released yesterday. The civil settlement calls for the downtown Baltimore hospital to reimburse the government for suspect HIV and Hepatitis C tests performed between August 2002 and August 2003. It said Maryland's Medicaid program would get $55,029.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2005
Dr. Abraham Kremen, a retired ophthalmologist and former Maryland General Hospital department chairman, died of multiple organ failure Thursday at Roland Park Place, where he had lived for the past eight years. He was 100. Born and raised in Baltimore, he was a 1923 graduate of City College. Teachers there recognized his musical ability and sent him to piano classes at the Peabody Conservatory, where instructors advised him against becoming a professional musician. Dr. Kremen earned a Bachelor of Science degree at the Johns Hopkins University and graduated from the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
March 4, 2005
Dr. James A. Doukas, a retired general surgeon and avid pleasure boater, died of pneumonia Feb. 24 at Maryland General Hospital. He was 84 and lived in the Phoenix area of Baltimore County. Dr. Doukas was born in Baltimore, the son of Greek immigrants, and raised in Havre de Grace, where he was a 1937 graduate of Havre de Grace High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1941 from Washington College and was a 1944 graduate of the University of Maryland Medical School. He was inducted into the Army and served in Germany during the final days of World War II. After the war, Dr. Doukas completed an internship at Doctor's Hospital in Washington and a surgical residency at the old West Baltimore General, later Liberty Medical Center.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Dennis O'Brien and Julie Bell and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2004
The state's top health official and a key legislator said yesterday that they want to revamp the system for regulating medical laboratories in the wake of serious testing breakdowns affecting thousands of patients in the Baltimore area. "The evidence is the regulatory system is broken," said state Health Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini. State Sen. Paula C. Hollinger, chairwoman of a Senate health panel, said the system is "falling apart." "We have to come up with more stringent rules for the state of Maryland, and that's exactly what we're going to do," said Hollinger, a Baltimore County Democrat, who has scheduled a hearing for Nov. 9. Hollinger said the problems at a Rosedale lab and at Maryland General Hospital - which cast doubt on the accuracy of test results for HIV, cancer and other ailments - might be "the tip of the iceberg."
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Julie Bell and Erika Niedowski and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2004
Colene Y. Daniel, a former Johns Hopkins Health System executive who also served six years on the Baltimore school board, has been named head of Maryland General Hospital, three months after a laboratory scandal prompted the resignation of the hospital's former chief executive. Daniel will take over as president and chief executive of the 243-bed community hospital the middle of next month. Her predecessor, Timothy D. Miller, stepped down in April after state regulators discovered that the hospital lab had given potentially faulty HIV and hepatitis test results to hundreds of people.
NEWS
July 24, 2004
On July 22, 2004 MARY GRACE (nee Lombardi); beloved wife of the late Joseph J. Murphy; loving mother of Mary Meyers, Gerald, Joseph and Michael Murphy, Patricia Cysyk, Denise Milkowski, Ann George, Elizabeth and Thomas Murphy; dear sister of Theresa Asburn and Leroy Lombardi; cherished grandmother of Chuck, Dennis, Erin Shea, Matthew, Marianna, Craig, Jeffrey and Regina; devoted great grandmother of Tyler and Natalie. The family will receive friends in the LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY INC., 10 W. Padonia Rd (at York Rd)
NEWS
June 17, 2004
The city Board of Estimates postponed voting on a plan to acquire a building near Maryland General Hospital yesterday after owners of a deli there said their business would be ruined. The board was considering a measure to give the mayor and City Council authority to acquire property at 890 Linden Ave. so that Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard could be widened. Owners of Linden Deli, Yong An and his brother-in-law, Yong Kim, paid about $480,000 for the building and the business 11 years ago, their attorney, John C. Murphy, told the board.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' investigative arm has subpoenaed documents relating to laboratory testing at Maryland General Hospital, which is under state investigation for Medicaid fraud. The 243-bed Baltimore hospital confirmed yesterday, after an inquiry by The Sun, that it had received a subpoena from HHS' Office of Inspector General. The subpoena, received May 11, sought information and records related to HIV and hepatitis testing conducted at the hospital from Jan. 1, 2002, through Aug. 30, 2003, the hospital said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Jacqueline Seaberg and Jacqueline Seaberg,Baltimoresun.com Staff | May 17, 2004
The way Jerry L. Lazarus sees it, too many vision-impaired seniors think losing their sight means living in total darkness. "So many seniors who are losing their sight don't really know what to do," said Lazarus, special projects director for the Baltimore-based National Federation of the Blind. "Their families don't know what to do. There are seniors out there who need information and help." The federation, which was founded in 1940 and moved to the city in 1978, will sponsor the 2004 Possibilities Fair Thursday at its new Jernigan Institute at 1800 Johnson St. in South Federal Hill.
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