Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaryland General Assembly
IN THE NEWS

Maryland General Assembly

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 9, 2014
I declare myself underwhelmed by the "accomplishments" of the 2014 Maryland General Assembly - a minimum wage increase so gradual it will have no effect on the standard of living for the working poor, a $431 million tax break for the heirs of millionaires, marijuana "decriminalization" that is hardly that, a paltry $4.3 million for pre-kindergarten education, and a broken promise on fully funding public employee pensions. I hate to be the party pooper, but what's all the celebrating and confetti about?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 1, 2014
Michael Phelps was largely forgiven for driving drunk near Salisbury University in 2004 because he was 19 years old. The charge was reduced to driving impaired, his record ultimately wiped clean by the courts. Five years later when a photo of him inhaling from a water pipe commonly used to smoke marijuana hit the Internet, he apologized again, and that incident blew over quickly as well. But what happened early Tuesday morning outside the Fort McHenry Tunnel was different. The man who possesses the most Olympic medals of any athlete in history failed a Breathalyzer test.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | January 27, 2008
Megan Novak had mixed emotions about her trip to Annapolis. She was assigned to work in the Senate chambers, but she didn't have any idea what to do or where to go. But things quickly changed for the C. Milton Wright High School senior. "At first it was nerve-wracking," said Novak, 17, one of 15 pages at the state capital two weeks ago. "But I knew that what I was doing was a privilege. I was able to get into any building that I wanted, and not many people can do that." Novak is one of 105 high school seniors throughout the state selected to work as pages for members of the Maryland General Assembly during the 2008 session.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
A state panel on Tuesday hashed out more of the nitty-gritty details to create a medical marijuana industry from scratch, but some key points remained unresolved as the commission nears a deadline next week. Maryland's Medical Marijuana Commission plans to release Wednesday a second draft of regulations to create the program. Those 81-pages of rules have been reshaped after the first draft came under fire at a public hearing last month. Among the many changes in the new draft: removing a provision that would have effectively outlawed a grower or dispensary operation within Baltimore city limits.
NEWS
September 9, 2013
Raising Maryland's minimum wage has faced tough going in Annapolis ever since Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. left office. It was the Republican governor's steadfast opposition to raising the minimum wage that spurred Democrats to support an increase in 2005 - and then override his veto. Since then, interest in setting wage levels has been, shall we say, minimal. So it came as a bit of surprise to hear Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller jump on the bandwagon last week, announcing his support for raising Maryland's minimum wage, particularly given that such a proposal died in the Senate Finance Committee on an 8-3 vote just months ago. Suddenly, it's become a front-burner issue.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | December 22, 2013
A recent New York Times illustration read, "COLLEGE IS FOR SUCKERS. " The words were emblazoned across the sweatshirts of four students, and the accompanying article made essentially that point. It echoed an increasingly common refrain that college is expensive, that students are taking on unmanageable debt and that they too often graduate unprepared for the world of work. In contrast, many economists and educators point to data showing that the fastest growing job categories require at least a college degree.
NEWS
April 26, 1991
Delegate Elizabeth S. Smith, R-Anne Arundel County, has been electedtreasurer of Women Legislators of the Maryland General Assembly for 1991-1992.
NEWS
January 3, 2010
The Howard County League of Women Voters hosts its annual luncheon with the county's delegation to the Maryland General Assembly at 11:30 a.m. Saturday at Bethany United Methodist Church, 2875 Bethany Lane. Cost is $15. For reservations and information, call 410-730-0142.
NEWS
August 1, 1995
An article in Friday's editions of The Sun misstated the amount of money appropriated by the state toward a new comprehensive cancer center at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Maryland General Assembly has authorized $30.5 million for the center.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
January 14, 2010
Should the Maryland General Assembly consider steep cuts in aid to local jurisdictions to balance the state's budget? Yes 58% No 35% Not sure 7% (888 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Should the federal government impose a special tax on big financial-services firms? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Ruling that the popular ride-sharing company Uber Technologies is subject to the same regulations imposed on other for-hire vehicle services in the state, state regulators at the same time ordered a revision of those rules to reflect the changing business. The Maryland Public Service Commission ruled Wednesday that Uber is a common carrier like other for-hire car services, a decision that the company opposed, saying it threatened its business model. Yet the commission also ordered its staff to begin crafting new rules for such for-hire companies, saying it recognizes "that many industry changes and technological advances have occurred since these regulations were adopted, including the everyday use of the Internet.
NEWS
June 14, 2014
I would like to personally thank The Sun's editorial board for providing the questionnaire responses of candidates for the primary election. I particularly would like to reference those provided by Tony Campbell, a Republican running for Baltimore County executive. Mr. Campbell has acknowledged growing up in western Pennsylvania and graduating from Blackhawk High School and the University of Pittsburgh. His roots are as a Pennsylvania Democrat. I found his answer regarding the creation of additional council districts to be ambiguous.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 13, 2014
Allow me to clear up something for Maryland voters: Jon Cardin is not Ben Cardin. Jon Cardin is a lawyer and a member of the Maryland House of Delegates from Baltimore County. Ben Cardin is a member of the U.S. Senate; he's the junior senator from Maryland. Jon Cardin is running in the June 24 primary for state attorney general. Ben Cardin is not running for anything this year. Jon Cardin is 44 years old. He is Ben Cardin's nephew. Ben Cardin is 70 years old. He is Jon Cardin's uncle.
FEATURES
Dan Rodricks | May 8, 2014
In the years since Baltimore Circuit Judge M. Brooke Murdock's famously controversial ruling helped energize the movement to overturn Maryland's ban against same-sex marriage, three gay men have invited her to officiate at their weddings. One was a lawyer and old friend. One was a fellow judge. The third was a man who used to walk his dog in Federal Hill at the same time of day Murdock did. Some time after her 2006 ruling that Maryland's marriage law was discriminatory, the dog-walker asked Murdock to preside at his wedding - once, he said, same-sex marriage became legal.
BUSINESS
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Five thousand workers at the University of Maryland Medical Center now have labor protections under the National Labor Relations Board thanks to a bill signed by Gov. Martin O'Malley Monday. Local labor union 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East had pushed for legislation that would allow the workers to unionize. Attorney General Doug Gansler issued an opinion on the matter last year saying the Maryland General Assembly had the authority to enact legislation subjecting UMMC to Maryland's collective bargaining law. In Maryland, private hospitals fall under the National Labor Relations Board and public hospitals fall under the Maryland Labor Relations Act. The University of Maryland Medical Center was governed by neither.
FEATURES
By Arlene Karidis, For The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
It's lunch time, and William Brown has stepped away from his desk for a nicotine fix in the lobby of the building where he works. The city employee isn't allowed to smoke here, but he can vape. He flips the switch on his sleek black electronic cigarette, with its digital readout to gauge the nicotine, and inhales. He sucks in on the plastic tip and blows out a big white cloud that dissipates fast. People pass by, but Brown says he rarely gets a reaction. "E-cigarettes have gotten so popular that when you spew out vapor, people put one and one together," said Brown, who works for the Municipal Telephone Exchange.
NEWS
January 28, 2001
The Sun is again offering a free fax broadcast of schedules for Maryland General Assembly committee hearings. To use this service, you must have a fax machine that can answer automatically. Hearing schedules will be transmitted over the weekend for the following week's hearings. To sign up for the service, call 410-783-1800 and enter code 7575.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 26, 2014
In the two years since the Maryland Court of Appeals ruled that pit bulls were inherently dangerous dogs, I developed a hobby: Pit Bull Google. It's a very edifying activity. Anyone with access to the Internet can do it. You click on Google News to get the search engine's most recent results. You enter the words "pit bull," and "attack" or "police. " (If you only enter "pit bull" you get the latest concert reviews for the rapper known as Pitbull.) Without fail, the search turns up a news story about a vicious dog attack somewhere in the U.S. within the last four to 48 hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
"House of Cards" and the state of Maryland reached a deal late Friday that will keep the Netflix series in state to film Season 3. "Spoiler alert: we're going to keep the 3,700 jobs and more than 100 million dollars of economic activity and investment that House of Cards generates right here in Maryland," Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement. "Media Rights Capital has been a great supporter of the people and entertainment community in Maryland and we couldn't be happier to continue our partnership.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.