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NEWS
April 1, 2010
We believe The Baltimore Sun should give recognition to the induction of four outstanding women into the Maryland Women's Hall of Fame in Annapolis on March 18. The honorees are: Claire M. Fraser-Legett, Anne Catharine Hoof Green, Irene Morgan Kirkaldy, Almira Hart Lincoln Phelps, Bernice R. Sandler and Lillie Shockney. Anne Catharine Green, deceased, 1775, was the first woman publisher of the oldest continuously published newspaper in America the Maryland Gazette, founded in 1727.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Media Group announced Thursday it has purchased The Capital in Annapolis, the Carroll County Times and other area publications and websites, a move that expands its journalistic footprint in Maryland. The financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed, but BSMG officials said the publications acquired from Norfolk, Va.-based Landmark Media Enterprises would continue as separate news organizations. "We want these publications to remain a valued source of news and opinions on local politics, communities, sports and the arts in Anne Arundel and Carroll counties," Timothy E. Ryan, publisher, president and CEO of the Baltimore Sun Media Group, said in a note to staff.
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NEWS
February 27, 2000
To mark Women's History Month, County Executive Janet S. Owens will play host to a celebration March 9 honoring four women who played a role in Anne Arundel's history. The women to be honored are: Dr. Faye Watson Allen, who became the first black female physician in the Annapolis area in 1951 when she joined the medical practice of her husband, the late Aris T. Allen. She worked as a family physician for 32 years, and worked part-time for the county health department, where she championed health care for minorities and helped develop a free cancer-detection program.
BUSINESS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Media Group announced Thursday it has purchased The Capital in  Annapolis , the  Carroll County   Times and other area publications and websites, a move that expands its journalistic footprint in Maryland. The financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed, but BSMG officials said the publications acquired from Norfolk, Va.-based Landmark Media Enterprises would continue as separate news organizations. “We want these publications to remain a valued source of news and opinions on local politics, communities, sports and the arts in Anne Arundel and Carroll counties,” Timothy E. Ryan, publisher, president and CEO of the Baltimore Sun Media Group, said in a note to staff.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
The editor and publisher of Capital Gazette Communications, which publishes The Capital newspaper in Annapolis, will retire at the end of the year after more than 35 years at the daily, the publishing company's owner said Friday. Tom Marquardt, who joined what was then The Evening Capital as managing editor in 1977, also has served as executive editor and took on his current role in 2008. Pat Richardson, publisher of the Carroll County Times in Westminster, will take over as publisher on Jan. 1. Richardson will serve as regional publisher of both the Annapolis and Westminster newspapers, which are owned by Landmark Media Enterprises LLC. When he came to Annapolis from Michigan at age 29, "The newspaper was black and white and Internet wasn't even a word," Marquardt said in the announcement.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Reports of Odessa Jones' death were, in the end, an exaggeration. This week, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County sent an email to students and faculty saying that Jones, a student who attends classes at the Shady Grove campus, had died. The funeral was to be held Friday in Silver Spring. A few days later, the university sent another email with the subject line, "Comforting News for the UMBC Community. " Jones was in fact alive, it said. "I am pleased to report that, this morning, the UMBC Police learned from the Montgomery County Police Department that Odessa Jones, the student who reportedly passed away earlier this week, is alive," the email said.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Media Group announced Thursday it has purchased The Capital in Annapolis, the Carroll County Times and other area publications and websites, a move that expands its journalistic footprint in Maryland. The financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed, but BSMG officials said the publications acquired from Norfolk, Va.-based Landmark Media Enterprises would continue as separate news organizations. "We want these publications to remain a valued source of news and opinions on local politics, communities, sports and the arts in Anne Arundel and Carroll counties," Timothy E. Ryan, publisher, president and CEO of the Baltimore Sun Media Group, said in a note to staff.
BUSINESS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Media Group announced Thursday it has purchased The Capital in  Annapolis , the  Carroll County   Times and other area publications and websites, a move that expands its journalistic footprint in Maryland. The financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed, but BSMG officials said the publications acquired from Norfolk, Va.-based Landmark Media Enterprises would continue as separate news organizations. “We want these publications to remain a valued source of news and opinions on local politics, communities, sports and the arts in Anne Arundel and Carroll counties,” Timothy E. Ryan, publisher, president and CEO of the Baltimore Sun Media Group, said in a note to staff.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts | February 7, 2010
T he newspaper ad, were it to run today, might appear in a lost-and-found column, wedged between yard sales and apartments for rent. Yet it could hardly say more about the spirit of an age. "Ran away from the Subscriber living in Annapolis, a young Country-born Negro Man named Harry," it said. "He is of a yellowish Complexion, near 6 Feet high, brisk and active. Had on and took with him a Wig, a new Felt Hat, a grey Pea Jacket, red Waistcoat and Breeches ... "Whoever takes up the said Negro, and delivers him to me, at Annapolis, shall have THREE POUNDS Reward.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
It's a sun-splashed morning in rolling southern Anne Arundel County, and a cluster of old oaks and maples make a fine canopy for the 25 gentlemen gathered at the cottage they see as a shrine. Some wear seersucker blazers and boating shoes. Many sport neckties with their club's logo - a British flag and an American flag, their staffs crossed. Their laughter echoes off the clubhouse, a bungalow built 34 years before the signing of the Declaration of Independence. "We have an ancient tradition - it never rains on meeting day at the Old South River Club," says Chris Wilson, a longtime member of the tiny Harwood society that calls itself "the oldest continuously operating social club in the English-speaking world.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Reports of Odessa Jones' death were, in the end, an exaggeration. This week, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County sent an email to students and faculty saying that Jones, a student who attends classes at the Shady Grove campus, had died. The funeral was to be held Friday in Silver Spring. A few days later, the university sent another email with the subject line, "Comforting News for the UMBC Community. " Jones was in fact alive, it said. "I am pleased to report that, this morning, the UMBC Police learned from the Montgomery County Police Department that Odessa Jones, the student who reportedly passed away earlier this week, is alive," the email said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
The editor and publisher of Capital Gazette Communications, which publishes The Capital newspaper in Annapolis, will retire at the end of the year after more than 35 years at the daily, the publishing company's owner said Friday. Tom Marquardt, who joined what was then The Evening Capital as managing editor in 1977, also has served as executive editor and took on his current role in 2008. Pat Richardson, publisher of the Carroll County Times in Westminster, will take over as publisher on Jan. 1. Richardson will serve as regional publisher of both the Annapolis and Westminster newspapers, which are owned by Landmark Media Enterprises LLC. When he came to Annapolis from Michigan at age 29, "The newspaper was black and white and Internet wasn't even a word," Marquardt said in the announcement.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
It's a sun-splashed morning in rolling southern Anne Arundel County, and a cluster of old oaks and maples make a fine canopy for the 25 gentlemen gathered at the cottage they see as a shrine. Some wear seersucker blazers and boating shoes. Many sport neckties with their club's logo - a British flag and an American flag, their staffs crossed. Their laughter echoes off the clubhouse, a bungalow built 34 years before the signing of the Declaration of Independence. "We have an ancient tradition - it never rains on meeting day at the Old South River Club," says Chris Wilson, a longtime member of the tiny Harwood society that calls itself "the oldest continuously operating social club in the English-speaking world.
NEWS
April 1, 2010
We believe The Baltimore Sun should give recognition to the induction of four outstanding women into the Maryland Women's Hall of Fame in Annapolis on March 18. The honorees are: Claire M. Fraser-Legett, Anne Catharine Hoof Green, Irene Morgan Kirkaldy, Almira Hart Lincoln Phelps, Bernice R. Sandler and Lillie Shockney. Anne Catharine Green, deceased, 1775, was the first woman publisher of the oldest continuously published newspaper in America the Maryland Gazette, founded in 1727.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts | February 7, 2010
T he newspaper ad, were it to run today, might appear in a lost-and-found column, wedged between yard sales and apartments for rent. Yet it could hardly say more about the spirit of an age. "Ran away from the Subscriber living in Annapolis, a young Country-born Negro Man named Harry," it said. "He is of a yellowish Complexion, near 6 Feet high, brisk and active. Had on and took with him a Wig, a new Felt Hat, a grey Pea Jacket, red Waistcoat and Breeches ... "Whoever takes up the said Negro, and delivers him to me, at Annapolis, shall have THREE POUNDS Reward.
NEWS
February 27, 2000
To mark Women's History Month, County Executive Janet S. Owens will play host to a celebration March 9 honoring four women who played a role in Anne Arundel's history. The women to be honored are: Dr. Faye Watson Allen, who became the first black female physician in the Annapolis area in 1951 when she joined the medical practice of her husband, the late Aris T. Allen. She worked as a family physician for 32 years, and worked part-time for the county health department, where she championed health care for minorities and helped develop a free cancer-detection program.
NEWS
September 16, 2005
Two African-American children enrolled at the new Sunnyside Acres School near Glen Burnie in September 1955, marking one of the first steps toward public school integration in Anne Arundel County. Sunnyside Acres School was one of two public schools open to black and white students. The other, the Millersville School for children with cerebral palsy, did not receive applications for admission. Altogether, 45 children applied for admission to Sunnyside Acres but only 30 were accepted, because each of the three teachers could handle only 10 students.
NEWS
March 4, 2007
March 9, 1887, ushered in a Short Line railroad service that many people wish were still around, connecting Annapolis to Baltimore. Maryland's state capital and its largest city were first linked by a 6:40 a.m. train carrying 25 passengers, which left Annapolis for Baltimore and arrived at 8 a.m. The zippy thrill of that first ride was not completely conveyed in newspaper reports. But one historian, Elihu S. Riley, noted, "There was a number of citizens out to give the venture a good send-off."
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