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NEWS
April 21, 1991
Havre de Grace eighth-graders did everything but sing sea chanteys Tuesday when they sailed from the Tide Water Marina in Havre de Grace on the Lady Maryland, one of two educational vessels operated by the Lady Maryland Foundation. The 30 eighth-grade students all wrote 100-word essays about why they should be chosen to sail. The best essays earned their authors a spot on the boat.Once on the boat, the students were divided into groups -- watermen, industrialists, developers, environmentalists and recreational users.
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BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | August 16, 2006
The decision by the University System of Maryland Foundation to forgo investments in companies linked to Sudan will not cause peace to break out anytime soon in Sudan's Darfur region. The foundation doesn't own stock in PetroChina or any other businesses it agreed to boycott, so last week's announcement causes no change. And even if it did, the janjaweed militias and the Sudanese army perpetrating slaughter in Darfur wouldn't even know about it. "As a practical matter it doesn't really affect the policy" in Sudan, David Cortright, an economic sanctions authority at the University of Notre Dame, said of the foundation's vow. "I don't want to condemn it by any means, but it doesn't really go very far."
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NEWS
September 19, 1991
The Lady Maryland Foundation, the Maryland Historical Trust and the Maryland Sail Dredgers Association have announced a plan to raise $1 million to save the last 25 working historic skipjacks.The campaign kicks off Nov. 2, with a fund-raiser hosted by the foundation and featuring guest speakers Charles Kuralt and Gov. William Donald Schaefer. To be held at Stouffer's in the Inner Harbor, the event will feature four regional cuisines, three bands, and a 600-person guest list that includes watermen, corporate VIPs, celebrities, preservationists, historians, environmentalists and educators.
NEWS
By GADI DECHTER and GADI DECHTER,SUN REPORTER | August 14, 2006
In response to student activists, and in step with a nationwide trend among college endowments, the University System of Maryland Foundation has pledged to avoid investing in four companies it believes help the government of Sudan commit genocide in the country's Darfur region. "We don't want to be associated with the mass murder of innocent civilians," Leonard Raley, president and CEO of the $700 million foundation, said last week. The announcement was greeted with enthusiastic approval by many in the university community, but some divestment activists said the foundation's resolution - formally adopted by its board in June but not publicly announced until last week - did not go far enough and left key questions unanswered.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1994
*Speakeasy Productions will conduct an open house of its audio studios on Thursday at 2 p.m. at 3616B Falls Road, in Hampden. Reply before 5 p.m. today by calling 889-7168.Kudos* Chapel Valley Landscape Co. won two Grand awards and a Decade award from Landscape Contractors Association D.C.-Md.-Va. The Carroll County firm also won a National Award from Professional Grounds Management Society and the Washington Office magazine's Readers Choice award.* Regina Pools & Spas, Timonium, was named one of the Top 100 businesses in the industry by the trade magazine Aqua.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | August 16, 2006
The decision by the University System of Maryland Foundation to forgo investments in companies linked to Sudan will not cause peace to break out anytime soon in Sudan's Darfur region. The foundation doesn't own stock in PetroChina or any other businesses it agreed to boycott, so last week's announcement causes no change. And even if it did, the janjaweed militias and the Sudanese army perpetrating slaughter in Darfur wouldn't even know about it. "As a practical matter it doesn't really affect the policy" in Sudan, David Cortright, an economic sanctions authority at the University of Notre Dame, said of the foundation's vow. "I don't want to condemn it by any means, but it doesn't really go very far."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2000
The University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Maryland, Baltimore moved a step closer to setting up their own fund-raising foundations after a committee of the Board of Regents of the university system gave the go-ahead yesterday. The two schools are expected to have their foundations operating by July 1. But they are expected to keep their money where it is, in the University of Maryland Foundation, which manages the endowments for most of the state's public colleges and universities.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Ivan Penn and Tom Pelton and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1998
The financially troubled fund-raising organization for Bowie State University has turned over management of its accounts to the University of Maryland system's larger fund-raising arm to help eliminate a deficit in operating funds said to be more than $64,000.The Bowie State University Foundation's decision Wednesday follows the release of an audit last month that criticized it for improperly dipping into restricted scholarship and campus activity accounts to cover overspending by its administration.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1990
Financial servicesDon F Gentile is named vice president in the Retail Division of the First Manufactured Housing Credit Corp., a subsidiary of First Maryland Bancorp. He will be responsible for monitoring and maintaining quality controls in asset generation, servicing and liquidation.C.E. "Ted" Peck is elected chairman of the University of Maryland Foundation board of directors. He is the former chairman and chief executive officer of The Ryland Group Inc., a national home-building and mortgage financial services company headquartered in Columbia.
NEWS
November 16, 1990
A lawmaker critical of political contributions from university foundations came up with a new college entrance test question for one Maryland university president last week.College Park President William E. Kirwan inspired the question when he observed that $1,000 worth of tickets to a gubernatorial fund-raiser might not violate the law against political contributions from tax-exempt accounts because of the way the invitation was worded. The question came from Sen. Julian L. Lapides, D-Baltimore, who said he heard a rumor that a new multi-choice question might be added to next year's Scholastic Achievement Test:Was Dr. Kirwan's comment in regard to a $1,000 contribution from the University of Maryland Foundation "A)
NEWS
August 18, 2003
In Baltimore City Boy, 8 months, found on street with cord around his neck An 8-month-old boy was found on a West Baltimore street with a cord wrapped around his neck and a rat-tailed comb lodged in his throat early yesterday -- an incident that is being investigating as child abuse, city police said. The infant, Shelton Miller, was in serious condition and breathing with the help of a ventilator at University of Maryland Medical Center's pediatric intensive care unit, police said. At 6:07 a.m., police received a call reporting that a baby had been abandoned in the 1400 block of Mountmor Court.
NEWS
June 21, 2002
BETWEEN WHITE MARSH and Chase lies a 1,000-acre wood that is about to be breached by a highway, an extension of Route 43. Plotting a path for the road, says Gary Setzer, a wetlands administrator with the Maryland Department of the Environment, "is like pointing a loaded gun into this area." Once the asphalt leads south from burgeoning White Marsh, with its collection of superstores, you can forget about keeping the woods intact. On the heels of the road crews will come the developers. Baltimore County, eager to revive its southeastern corner, wants to encourage building on the site.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2000
The University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Maryland, Baltimore moved a step closer to setting up their own fund-raising foundations after a committee of the Board of Regents of the university system gave the go-ahead yesterday. The two schools are expected to have their foundations operating by July 1. But they are expected to keep their money where it is, in the University of Maryland Foundation, which manages the endowments for most of the state's public colleges and universities.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Ivan Penn and Tom Pelton and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1998
The financially troubled fund-raising organization for Bowie State University has turned over management of its accounts to the University of Maryland system's larger fund-raising arm to help eliminate a deficit in operating funds said to be more than $64,000.The Bowie State University Foundation's decision Wednesday follows the release of an audit last month that criticized it for improperly dipping into restricted scholarship and campus activity accounts to cover overspending by its administration.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1997
Squeezed by reduced state aid and pressure to control tuition, the University System of Maryland announced yesterday a campaign to raise $700 million in the next five years, the largest fund drive in the system's nine-year history.The ambitious goal puts Maryland's system among the major fund-raisers in American public higher education and reflects a growing trend toward what some call the privatization of public universities.At a time when taxpayers are scrutinizing state spending and parents are fretting over college costs, the universities' quest might seem perplexing.
NEWS
October 16, 1997
IN DEATH AS IN LIFE, James W. Rouse is making a difference. The visionary developer of Columbia, Baltimore's Harborplace and showcase commercial developments around the world died in April 1996, but he left money in his will to boost the kinds of social causes he supported when he lived.Mr. Rouse's associates insist that first and foremost, he was a businessman. But his passion for social change rivaled his entrepreneurial spirit. His work to improve life in impoverished communities began even before he conceived of Columbia, the Inner Harbor or one of the nation's first enclosed shopping centers in Anne Arundel County's Harundale.
NEWS
August 18, 2003
In Baltimore City Boy, 8 months, found on street with cord around his neck An 8-month-old boy was found on a West Baltimore street with a cord wrapped around his neck and a rat-tailed comb lodged in his throat early yesterday -- an incident that is being investigating as child abuse, city police said. The infant, Shelton Miller, was in serious condition and breathing with the help of a ventilator at University of Maryland Medical Center's pediatric intensive care unit, police said. At 6:07 a.m., police received a call reporting that a baby had been abandoned in the 1400 block of Mountmor Court.
NEWS
October 16, 1997
IN DEATH AS IN LIFE, James W. Rouse is making a difference. The visionary developer of Columbia, Baltimore's Harborplace and showcase commercial developments around the world died in April 1996, but he left money in his will to boost the kinds of social causes he supported when he lived.Mr. Rouse's associates insist that first and foremost, he was a businessman. But his passion for social change rivaled his entrepreneurial spirit. His work to improve life in impoverished communities began even before he conceived of Columbia, the Inner Harbor or one of the nation's first enclosed shopping centers in Anne Arundel County's Harundale.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1994
*Speakeasy Productions will conduct an open house of its audio studios on Thursday at 2 p.m. at 3616B Falls Road, in Hampden. Reply before 5 p.m. today by calling 889-7168.Kudos* Chapel Valley Landscape Co. won two Grand awards and a Decade award from Landscape Contractors Association D.C.-Md.-Va. The Carroll County firm also won a National Award from Professional Grounds Management Society and the Washington Office magazine's Readers Choice award.* Regina Pools & Spas, Timonium, was named one of the Top 100 businesses in the industry by the trade magazine Aqua.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1994
Charles W. Cole Jr., who retired as chief executive of First Maryland Bancorp in April, has been hired as vice chairman of an investment advisory affiliate of Alex. Brown Inc., the company announced yesterday.Mr. Cole, 58, also has been appointed to the board of directors of the firm, Brown Advisory & Trust Co., which is jointly owned by Alex. Brown and Philadelphia-based Glenmede Trust Co."In my 17 years as president of First Maryland, I developed a keen interest in financial and capital markets," Mr. Cole said yesterday.
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