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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Maryland's burgeoning agritourism industry is offering consumers yet another product to satisfy their hunger - or thirst, in this case - for locally grown goods. Recently enacted legislation has generated a flurry of hops growing, barley malting and beer brewing at several farms. Henry Ruhlman brewed beer for himself for about six years and now has opened a retail venture at his Creeping Creek Farms in northern Carroll County, using a key ingredient he grows right there. He started with 24 hops plants three years ago and has expanded the crop to more than 1,600 vines.
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NEWS
By Dixie Mullineaux, Bonnie Raindrop | November 20, 2013
Note: This op-ed has been updated to include the correct email address for co-author Bonnie Raindrop.  Maryland beekeepers lost nearly half of our honeybee hives last year, while 31 percent of all honeybee colonies died across the United States. Similar bee losses have been occurring for at least a decade. Yet information that could help researchers solve this mystery is being withheld from the research community. We have a chance to change that in Maryland's 2014 General Assembly session, when legislators will debate a bill to create a research database showing when, where and in what quantities pesticides are used by commercial applicators in our state.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
The brown marmorated stink bug — a dime-sized Asian invader that has been besieging Maryland homes in recent years — has now become a serious farm pest. Agricultural scientists say the insect's populations have "exploded" this year, and they've demonstrated an unexpected ability to feed during all their developmental stages on a wide variety of crops. Maryland farmers — especially fruit and vegetable growers in Western and Central Maryland — are seeing a sharp increase in costly damage from the insects.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Amid an outcry from Maryland farmers, state officials pulled back again Friday from a new regulation aimed at cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay by restricting the use of animal manure to fertilize crops. The Maryland Department of Agriculture announced that it was withdrawing the proposed rule for more study, less than a week before a legislative hearing that was expected to draw a standing-room-only crowd. The move was welcomed by agriculture industry spokesmen, who had questioned the science behind the rule and complained about the potential economic impact on farmers.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2005
AH, SWEET CORN on the cob -- a summertime treat for most Marylanders -- is best fresh from the field. It is the freshness that ensures that the kernels have their ephemeral sweet taste and juiciness. And that is what adds to the popularity of farmers' markets and roadside farm stands among consumers across the state. "This is gonna be a real treat," Donna Edwards said as she packed a dozen ears of Argent white corn into a sack as she shopped the farmers' market behind The Avenue at White Marsh Mall on Friday morning.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | March 2, 2008
Local consumers prefer buying their produce from Maryland farmers, and nearly half of the grocery shoppers say they would be willing to pay more for locally grown fruits and vegetables. These are several of the findings related to agriculture in the latest annual public opinion survey by the University of Baltimore's Schaefer Center for Public Policy. Nearly 78 percent of the adults surveyed said they would be more likely to buy produce that is identified as having been grown by Maryland farmers.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | November 20, 2005
Farmers are not known for flaunting their blessings. They grumble about the weather and fuss about low grain prices, even when things are good. But between the first drumstick and the last football game this Thanksgiving, Maryland farmers might want to consider taking a moment to count their blessings. "It has been a bountiful year," Maryland Agriculture Secretary Lewis R. Riley said last week as he took a break from making repairs on his John Deere tractor. "There were a few ups and downs with the weather," he said.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | July 13, 2008
As their planting season progressed, Maryland farmers altered earlier plans and seeded less corn and more soybeans than they originally intended. In March, farmers announced plans to plant 490,000 acres of corn this year. That would have been a decline of 9.26 percent from the 2007 planting, the largest in 15 years. That thinking changed, however, when diesel fuel used to power their big rigs began creeping closer to $5 a gallon, fertilizer costs went through the roof and rains limited their days in the field.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | July 2, 1991
Maryland farmers have raised tobacco, corn, soybeans and berries, but now another business is budding.A growing number of farmers, like Virginia Garnett of Upperco and Todd Butler of Germantown, have turned to flowers as a cash crop.In the past five years, the Maryland cut-flower industry has grown from a $1-million-a-year back-yard business to a $7 million industry for more than 150 farmers throughout the state. Most of those in the business today were not growing flowers 10 years ago, said William Healey, an assistant professor of horticulture at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
December 11, 1999
WITH Congress killing Maryland dairy farmers' hopes of joining a price-setting Northeast compact, and with a 15-percent drop in federal milk price payments due next month, the shrinking state industry is struggling for new ways to stop the bleeding.One promising approach: a regional program that aims to combine resources to produce efficiencies, and profits, in the dairy industries of the Northeastern states. The plan is modeled after a similar program in New York state that coordinates resources from state agencies, agriculture schools and veterinarians.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
A bill moving through the General Assembly would give Maryland farmers a 10-year reprieve from new state or local environmental regulations if the state Department of Agriculture deems they're doing their part to clean up the Chesapeake Bay. To get the deal, farmers would first have to reduce pollution from their land more quickly than is now required – an important point, supporters say, since farm runoff is the largest contributor to the bay's...
BUSINESS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Maryland's burgeoning agritourism industry is offering consumers yet another product to satisfy their hunger - or thirst, in this case - for locally grown goods. Recently enacted legislation has generated a flurry of hops growing, barley malting and beer brewing at several farms. Henry Ruhlman brewed beer for himself for about six years and now has opened a retail venture at his Creeping Creek Farms in northern Carroll County, using a key ingredient he grows right there. He started with 24 hops plants three years ago and has expanded the crop to more than 1,600 vines.
NEWS
July 5, 2011
There was a time, Maryland Secretary of Agriculture Earl F. Hance recalls, when a beginning Maryland farmer could put a few chicken houses on his land and be assured that the income from them would pay off his farm. Those days are gone, replaced by what the agriculture secretary calls anxious times for the state's chicken farmers. The sway of "big chicken" — companies like Perdue, Mountaire and Tyson that process the chickens that Delmarva farmers raise — got smaller recently, when Allen Family Foods Inc. of Seaford, Del., announced it would file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and said it was selling many of its assets.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
The brown marmorated stink bug — a dime-sized Asian invader that has been besieging Maryland homes in recent years — has now become a serious farm pest. Agricultural scientists say the insect's populations have "exploded" this year, and they've demonstrated an unexpected ability to feed during all their developmental stages on a wide variety of crops. Maryland farmers — especially fruit and vegetable growers in Western and Central Maryland — are seeing a sharp increase in costly damage from the insects.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
Farming, according to President Harry S. Truman, a man familiar with rural life, depended on "good manure. " When Mr. Truman's wife Bess was asked why the president couldn't use the more delicate word "fertilizer," she replied that it had taken her 25 years to get him to say "manure. " Whatever it is called — litter, droppings, excreta — it is a major factor in chicken farming, as anyone who has been caught downwind of a chicken house can attest. Maryland produces nearly 300 million broilers per year, and a byproduct of that process is an estimated 400,000 pounds of what the industry refers to as "chicken litter.
NEWS
June 23, 2010
It is an outrage that liberal Maryland politicians and the Maryland press blame livestock farmers as a primary source of pollution in the Chesapeake Bay ("The cost of farming," June 22). Politicians and environmental organizations such as Sen. Benjamin Cardin and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation never give Maryland farmers credit for the utilization of best management practices, and they fail to tell Maryland citizens that Maryland agriculture is moving out of the state. My question to Senator Cardin, is why are Maryland livestock farmers being targeted primary polluters of the Chesapeake Bay?
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | July 8, 2007
Maryland grain farmers, especially those growing corn, appear headed for a bin-busting harvest this fall - if the weather cooperates. In its first estimate of the scope of this year's harvest, the U.S. Department of Agriculture estimated last week that Maryland farmers planted 540,000 acres of corn, a 10 percent increase over last year and the largest corn crop in 15 years. Much of the additional corn was planted on land that sprouted soybeans last year, resulting in soybean plantings checking in at the lowest level since 1987.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1998
WYE MILLS -- Maryland farmers are suffering through one of their worst years ever and their financial problems are not expected to improve anytime soon.That was the consensus of state and federal agriculture leaders who participated in an all-day Agricultural Outlook and Policy Conference sponsored by the Cooperative Extension arm of the University of Maryland.Keith Collins, chief economist of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, said most of the farm troubles can be attributed to Asia, which is suffering through a recession and hurting U.S. farm sales.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | March 31, 2010
A sk Lucie L. Snodgrass what she would recommend for Easter dinner and she does not simply say lamb. Instead, she says, "some of Edwin's lamb." She is referring to what would be an extremely local main dish, a lamb raised by her Harford County neighbor and cookbook collaborator, Edwin Remsberg. Remsberg is a photographer who worked with Snodgrass to produce a striking new cookbook, "Dishing Up Maryland." The book contains 150 recipes featuring local fare from Maryland farmers, watermen and restaurateurs.
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