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NEWS
November 10, 2010
In response to The Sun's suggestion that Maryland should raise its gas tax to pay for infrastructure ("The tax that saves jobs," Nov. 10), I shop the specials at the Giant in order to save 20 to 30 cents a gallon at the pump. My friends and family are currently unemployed for the last year, had their salaries reduced 20 to 50 percent (not through furlough days) or make salaries less than a "living wage," according to City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke's standards. These are the people on whom The Sun wants to raise taxes.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser | September 25, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Less than six weeks before Election Day, the candidates for governor are flooding the airwaves with apocalyptic messages about the dire consequences of choosing the other guy. The ads warn that Republican Larry Hogan is "dangerous," while Democrat Anthony G. Brown is "just not ready to be governor. " But they give viewers little information on how either man would govern. Both campaigns are focusing on a remarkably narrow range of attacks, hammered home through constant repetition.
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EXPLORE
November 15, 2011
Former Republican candidate for Comptroller of Maryland released the following statement this afternoon about Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed gas tax increase: In 2010, I spoke openly about the reckless prospect of raising gasoline taxes here in Maryland. Unfortunately, our representatives in Annapolis failed to listen, and have embarked upon a path to raising the gas tax here in Maryland. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that a gas tax hike is a bad deal for Maryland families and job creators.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Del. Jon S. Cardin, the front-runner to become Maryland's next attorney general, this morning issued a statement addressing yesterday's report in The Baltimore Sun that he missed nearly 75 percent of his committee votes during this year's General Assembly session.  Cardin initially declined to be interviewed about the issue and his campaign wouldn't say why he missed so many votes in committee - where members make critical decisions about whether...
NEWS
April 16, 2012
We have heard for the past few days that the budget impasse in the state legislature will cause a "doomsday" budget to go into effect July 1 ("Schools, localities face the unknown," April 12). Examination of the state budgets shows that the so called "doomsday" budget totals $35.3 billion, down from a proposed budget for next year of $35.8 billion. So "doomsday" means the government will have to reduce its proposed budget by 1.4 percent or the roof will cave in. And take note of the fact that the expected spending level for the state this year is $34.8 billion!
NEWS
By Randy Edsall | December 30, 2013
As the football coach at the University of Maryland, College Park, I consider myself fortunate to have players who have the academic foundation to be successful in college. I am not alone. College coaches nationwide have a vested interest in expanding the pipeline of young adults who are prepared for the rigors of college work. In NCAA Division I schools in particular, athletes are allowed no more than five years to graduate while receiving athletically related financial aid. And Division I schools are monitored by their Academic Progress Rate, which is calculated based on the academic eligibility and retention of each student athlete.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | December 22, 2013
A recent New York Times illustration read, "COLLEGE IS FOR SUCKERS. " The words were emblazoned across the sweatshirts of four students, and the accompanying article made essentially that point. It echoed an increasingly common refrain that college is expensive, that students are taking on unmanageable debt and that they too often graduate unprepared for the world of work. In contrast, many economists and educators point to data showing that the fastest growing job categories require at least a college degree.
NEWS
April 3, 1996
IF THE AMERICAN family were in healthier shape -- fewer divorces, fewer custody cases to resolve, fewer child support payments to collect, fewer children in need of foster care or adoption -- Maryland's current judicial structure might not prove such a heavy burden on so many of its citizens.But the fact is that 50 percent of many court dockets in Maryland involve domestic cases and, all too often, the families have to stand in a long line for judicial attention -- thus stringing out what is already a painfully extended and confusing crisis.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2010
By now, many of the deadlines have passed for scholarship-hunting college students. But don't despair: Maryland families still have one week to apply for aid from Central Scholarship Bureau, a nonprofit that's adding scholarships thanks to some recent donations. The Pikesville group, which makes grants and interest-free student loans to Marylanders, last month received pledges for two sizable gifts to create more scholarships. That was on top of smaller donations earlier this year that established four scholarships.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
John L. Kellermann III, a Parkinson's disease sufferer who played a major role in the passage by the state legislature in 2006 of the Maryland Stem Cell Research Act and also served as a founding member of the stem cell research commission, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at his Ocean City summer home. The longtime Loch Raven Village resident was 56. Mr. Kellermann was 38 years old and a vice president of the old First National Bank of Maryland when he noticed a twitch in two fingers of his left hand.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
Kudos to Dawson Nolley for his exquisitely written letter ( "Film tax credits pay off for Maryland," March 3). As a lay person to the specifics of the TV and film production industry, I was certainly able to understand and empathize with the individuals and their families who are impacted. I think, too often, the "little guy" is overshadowed by the glitz and glamour associated with the celebrities involved in these productions, and it is certainly hard to worry about their lifestyles and salaries.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2014
The 11-year-old Dundalk girl found after a frantic, multistate search has been reunited with her twin sister, family members said Sunday. Caitlyn Virts and her twin sister, Cayla, were back together in the care of Baltimore County social services workers, according to the twins' grandmother, Anna Trainor-Goodwin. Police found Caitlyn in a Florence, S.C., hotel Friday after issuing an Amber Alert and fielding thousands of tips. "I'm hoping and praying that they let me have them," said Trainor-Goodwin, who lives near Patterson Park in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | January 22, 2014
As Gov. Martin O'Malley makes his final state of the state speech Thursday, it's a good time to look at what seven years of his governorship have meant for Maryland. The state of the state is clearly good: first in median family income, a top three state in income mobility, first in K-12 education five years in a row. And Maryland has already recovered 99 percent of jobs lost in the Great Recession. These are hard facts. But such snapshots overstate and understate Mr. O'Malley's impact.
NEWS
By Randy Edsall | December 30, 2013
As the football coach at the University of Maryland, College Park, I consider myself fortunate to have players who have the academic foundation to be successful in college. I am not alone. College coaches nationwide have a vested interest in expanding the pipeline of young adults who are prepared for the rigors of college work. In NCAA Division I schools in particular, athletes are allowed no more than five years to graduate while receiving athletically related financial aid. And Division I schools are monitored by their Academic Progress Rate, which is calculated based on the academic eligibility and retention of each student athlete.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Thoughts of childhood Christmases flooded Wendy Winebrenner's mind this month when she opened her mailbox to find an envelope stuffed with gift certificates. Growing up in the O'Donnell Heights project in Baltimore, Winebrenner and her family depended on those donations from Santa Claus Anonymous to buy one another presents. But this year, Winebrenner, who is now raising her grandson in Middle River, sent the gift certificates back. Winebrenner, 49, had saved enough for the holiday.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | December 22, 2013
A recent New York Times illustration read, "COLLEGE IS FOR SUCKERS. " The words were emblazoned across the sweatshirts of four students, and the accompanying article made essentially that point. It echoed an increasingly common refrain that college is expensive, that students are taking on unmanageable debt and that they too often graduate unprepared for the world of work. In contrast, many economists and educators point to data showing that the fastest growing job categories require at least a college degree.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2005
Snowstorms were once a cause for celebration at the Thaden house on Anne Arundel County's southern coast. Dad, Jim, would get a fire going and mom, Eileen, would bake cookies and heat up a pot of chili. Daughters Bonnie, 16, and Katie, 13, might have friends over to build snow forts in the family's ample yard. The day would conclude with movies or board games in a toasty den. But last weekend's snowstorm invited dread and boredom. Would the pipes freeze? Would it be too cold to do anything but wrap yourself in a comforter and go to sleep?
NEWS
March 11, 2013
What pesticides are Maryland families exposed to on a regular basis? Good luck finding out. There's simply no way for the average person to discover what chemicals are being applied to farm fields or even backyards. Worse, it's nearly impossible for anyone in the public health field to find out either. Should doctors discover an unusually high incidence in Maryland of leukemia or other cancer that might be associated with environmental exposure, they'd be hard-pressed to analyze the risk from pesticides.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Prior to being drafted by the Baltimore Ravens in 2006, Koch played in his native Nebraska at University of Nebraska, where he earned a degree in business administration. He and his wife, Nikki, live in Westminster with their three sons, Ryan, 15, Braxtyn, 9, and Kamdyn, 7. The couple will welcome a daughter this fall. Along with his thoughts on youth football and fatherhood, Koch says that, yes, everyone in his family has one of No. 4's signature “Punters are people too” T-shirts.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| November 5, 2013
The votes are in! Here are the winners of the Maryland Family Readers' Choice Awards 2013: Best story time Irvine Nature Center ( Owings Mills ) explorenature.org Honorable Mention: Howard County Library Miller Branch ( Ellicott City ) hclibrary.org Howard County Library (general) hclibrary.org Best museum for families Port Discovery (Baltimore) portdiscovery.org Honorable Mention: National Aquarium (Baltimore)
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