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Tim Wheeler | May 10, 2012
Representatives of land trusts and conservation groups are expected to gather May 15 in Columbia for a statewide conference on the challenges of saving land in Maryland. Howard County Executive Ken Ulman is scheduled to keynote the all-day event, which is hosted by the Maryland Environmental Trust . The conference, which runs from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., is open to the public, though it'll cost $60 per person to cover all meals and admission to the sessions, including the trust's award ceremony and celebration.
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NEWS
April 14, 2013
In response to Dan Rodricks ' column regarding Dutch Ruppersberger ("Ruppersberger weighs run for governor," April 11), yeah, that's all well and good, but when are we going to start holding politicians responsible for their past actions, or lack thereof? As Baltimore County executive, Mr. Ruppersberger enabled, if not looked the other way (which is more insidious), as David Brown razed the Samuel Owings House. One more chance at Baltimore County's growth becoming something more than another Paramus, N.J., blown.
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NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1997
John C. Bernstein, director of the influential Valleys Planning Council, is leaving the Baltimore County land preservation group to head the Maryland Environmental Trust.Bernstein, 43, has led the council since Jan. 1, 1995, winning the respect of preservationists, farmers and the developers he often opposed."He did an excellent job," said lawyer G. Scott Barhight, who represents a project that is anathema to the Valleys Planning Council -- the development of a country club on the site of the historic Hayfields off Shawan Road.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
It's close to Interstate 97, just down the road from Lures Bar and Grille and 10 minutes from the heavy traffic of Annapolis. Yet as you set foot onto Anne Arundel County's most recent environmental management enterprise, you'd swear you had entered the most remote regions of the Blue Ridge mountains. A barely used path twines through growths of wild blackberry and Virginia creeper, follows a plunging ravine past dogwoods and poplars, and disappears near a cedar tree whose bark has been stripped near the roots, a telltale sign that a buck has made his way through.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | January 12, 1993
Ask residents of western Howard County why they moved there, and most have the same answer -- to live among the wide open spaces.What some have discovered, however, is that those spaces were also wide open to development.The Howard County Conservancy wants to play a major role in changing that by taking control of large tracts of protected land mandated by new county regulations.In September, Howard County Council members approved western zoning regulations requiring developers to cluster homes on smaller sites, creating large undeveloped tracts.
NEWS
By K. King Burnett | November 1, 2009
The controversy surrounding the state Board of Public Works' recent acquisition of 1,000 acres of undeveloped land in Dorchester County underscores a dilemma for conservationists. In good economic times, most people recognize the value of preserving working lands, natural habitats and open space for future generations. Tougher times, some argue, call for harder choices. Among many pressing priorities, land conservation may begin to sound like a luxury we can delay until the economy rebounds.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2000
A 44-acre patch of woods and brush along Western Run in Hunt Valley has become the 500th property preserved from development by the Maryland Environmental Trust. "It's a wonderful example of all of the types of land in Baltimore County I like," said the owner, Andrew Krause, noting the rolling hills, wetlands and 2,000 feet of shoreline along Western Run. Krause, a Hunt Valley business executive, donated the development rights -- which constitutes giving an easement -- last week as part of an agreement that will allow him to build a house on the land.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2002
The state Board of Public Works will consider a request Wednesday by environmental officials for $450,000 toward the purchase of 111 acres of wooded, waterfront land, in an attempt to preserve one of the last unspoiled parcels near Annapolis. Determined not to lose the site to a planned development of more than 300 homes, homeowners in the community of Bay Ridge spearheaded the effort to buy the property for $4.1 million. In the neighborhood campaign to save a rare piece of open space, residents committed more than $900,000 to the purchase price.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | January 7, 1993
Ask residents of the western Howard County why they moved there, and most have the same answer -- to live among the wide open spaces.What some have discovered, however, is that those spaces were also wide open to development.The Howard County Conservancy wants to play a major role in changing that by taking control of large tracts of protected land mandated by new county regulations.In September, County Council members approved western zoning regulations requiring developers to cluster homes on smaller sites, creating large undeveloped tracts.
NEWS
April 19, 1993
In his quiet way, Billy James left a real mark on Maryland. Long before he died Saturday at age 79, there was a William S. James Senate Office Building in Annapolis, and a William S. James Elementary School in his native Harford County. These are appropriate memorials, for the General Assembly and public education were two of Mr. James's great interests, but the legacy of this studious and far-sighted man to his state will outlast anything made of bricks and mortar.He was a lawyer, a historian, a conservationist, and of course a politician.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 10, 2012
Representatives of land trusts and conservation groups are expected to gather May 15 in Columbia for a statewide conference on the challenges of saving land in Maryland. Howard County Executive Ken Ulman is scheduled to keynote the all-day event, which is hosted by the Maryland Environmental Trust . The conference, which runs from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., is open to the public, though it'll cost $60 per person to cover all meals and admission to the sessions, including the trust's award ceremony and celebration.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
Along Lyons Creek in southern Anne Arundel County are woods that offer perfect places for migratory songbirds to hide their young, native trees that provide a fruit buffet for critters, and marshes where ducks scour for snacks. One tract in the area recently took on added significance. When Pat Melville placed her land into a program to ensure that no development can occur on it, she created a milestone for a local nonprofit organization. Her 53 acres became the 50th property placed into a conservation agreement with the Scenic Rivers Land Trust, which is holding the easement jointly with the Maryland Environmental Trust.
EXPLORE
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | December 27, 2011
Timed to coincide with its 20th anniversary in 2011, the Harford Land Trust recently announced the launch of its three-year Campaign to Preserve Our Lands, which is designed to increase awareness and raise funds to further land preservation in Harford County. The goal is to raise $250,000 for its various land preservation initiatives, the Harford Land Trust said in a news release. While the campaign was officially launched at HLT's annual meeting in March 2011, the initial phase of the campaign solicited donations exclusively from current members and past donors, Harry Webster, president of the nonprofit's board of directors, said in the release.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Two families in financial distress are asking Baltimore County to buy the development rights to their farms so they can preserve them as agricultural land, a county official said. Owners of the two separate tracts, comprising nearly 132 acres in Cockeysville and Maryland Line, have qualified for a six-year-old program designed to preserve land that faces an immediate threat of being sold for some non-agricultural use, said Wally Lippincott, natural resource manager for the county Department of Environmental Protection and Resource Management.
NEWS
By K. King Burnett | November 1, 2009
The controversy surrounding the state Board of Public Works' recent acquisition of 1,000 acres of undeveloped land in Dorchester County underscores a dilemma for conservationists. In good economic times, most people recognize the value of preserving working lands, natural habitats and open space for future generations. Tougher times, some argue, call for harder choices. Among many pressing priorities, land conservation may begin to sound like a luxury we can delay until the economy rebounds.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2003
Like an officer on the beat, Jon Chapman stalks Maryland's verdant fields, a notebook in one hand and a camera around his neck, looking for problems that he hopes he won't find. He is checking on preserved land, property that owners have promised not to develop. It is a never-ending responsibility -- preservation is meaningless unless someone follows through, making sure people are not dumping, building or otherwise breaking the rules. But the scope can be daunting, especially for large organizations like the Maryland Environmental Trust.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2003
Like an officer on the beat, Jon Chapman stalks Maryland's verdant fields, a notebook in one hand and a camera around his neck, looking for problems that he hopes he won't find. He is checking on preserved land, property that owners have promised not to develop. It is a never-ending responsibility -- preservation is meaningless unless someone follows through, making sure people are not dumping, building or otherwise breaking the rules. But the scope can be daunting, especially for large organizations like the Maryland Environmental Trust.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
In response to Dan Rodricks ' column regarding Dutch Ruppersberger ("Ruppersberger weighs run for governor," April 11), yeah, that's all well and good, but when are we going to start holding politicians responsible for their past actions, or lack thereof? As Baltimore County executive, Mr. Ruppersberger enabled, if not looked the other way (which is more insidious), as David Brown razed the Samuel Owings House. One more chance at Baltimore County's growth becoming something more than another Paramus, N.J., blown.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2003
John E. Clark, a former member of the House of Delegates who later served as the chief judge of the People's Court in Harford County and was active in land stewardship, died Friday of heart failure at Calvert Manor Healthcare Center in Rising Sun. He was 92. A practicing lawyer in Bel Air for nearly five decades, he blended careers in public service and politics with private legal work and a love of the land. "He always had an interest in politics and civic responsibility," said his wife, Sharon Clark.
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