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By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | December 22, 2005
Joseph G. Anastasi, a former Maryland economic development secretary who was active in numerous Democratic political campaigns, died of a brain tumor Tuesday at the Eugene B. Casey House, a Rockville hospice. He was 68. He began his political career chairing a Silver Spring business and citizen committee for John F. Kennedy's 1960 presidential campaign and went on to manage campaigns for two Maryland governors. "He was an extremely competent, capable man who was good to have working with you," former Gov. Marvin Mandel said yesterday.
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NEWS
June 3, 2014
For today's edition of the Maryland Democratic gubernatorial debate fact-check, we'll focus on a recurring point of contention between Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, and on the one aspect of Del. Heather Mizeur's platform that generated significant disagreement among the candidates. Is Virginia 'cleaning our clock'? Mr. Gansler attacked the economic record of Mr. Brown and Gov. Martin O'Malley in part by suggesting the economy in Virginia is much stronger than the economy in Maryland.
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BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie VfB | January 28, 1992
...6TC The University of Maryland Baltimore County came a step closer to building a biotechnology research park yesterday when the state gave preliminary approval for a $1.45 million economic development loan.The Maryland Economic Development Corp., a state-chartered company that helps finance development projects, agreed to lend the money to UMBC to begin building roads, sewers and a water system.The university must get approval from the state Board of Public Works before it can receive the loan.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
If you're aiming to be upwardly mobile, living in Maryland might help. The state is one of the best in the country for moving on up, what the study calls positive economic mobility, a new study by the Pew Charitable Trusts concludes. States doing better than average are largely in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, while those doing worse are in the South, according to the report, released Wednesday. Researchers at Pew's ongoing Economic Mobility Project say they're trying to answer a big question: Is the American dream alive and well?
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1995
The Maryland Economic Development Commission apparently didn't take long in getting down to serious business. It went into closed session yesterday at its first-ever meeting.The commission, a high-powered lineup of Maryland business and organization executives recruited by the Glendening administration to help the state set economic development strategy, transacted little substantive business in the open portion of its maiden gathering.But after a pep talk by the governor's new economic development secretary and a briefing from staff members, the commission ushered reporters out. A spokeswoman for the Department of Employment and Economic Development cited a provision of the state open meetings law that lets agencies exclude the public when discussing matters involving state efforts to attract or retain a specific business.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1992
Tuesday, 1 p.m.Senate Budget and Taxation Subcommittee on Public Safety, Transportation, Economic Development and Natural Resources, Room 400, James Senate Office BuildingBudget Hearings: Department of Economic and Employment Development, Maryland Economic Development Corp., Department of Licensing and RegulationSubcommittee On Health, Education and Human Resources, Room 100, James SOBBudget Hearing: Maryland Biotechnology Institute and Sea GrantHouse Economic Matters Room 150, Lowe House Office BuildingHB 127 Investment Advisers -- Definition; HB 957 Real Estate Brokers -- Licensing Exception; HB 1132 Registration of Retail Service Station Dealers -- Extension of Conversion Moratorium; HB 1196 Maryland Securities Act -- Investment Advisers -- Registration; HB 1249 Investment Advisers -- Definition and Exemptions; HB 1398 Maryland Securities Law -- Exempt Securities and Transactions; HB 1405 Maryland Securities Law -- Revisions and Corrections; HB 1406 Maryland Securities Act -- Fees and Penalties$Wednesday, 1 p.m.Senate Judicial Proceedings, Room 300, James SOBSB 408 Construction Contracts -- Losing Bidder Entitled to Damages; SB 439 Job-Related Drug Testing -- Requirements and Confidentiality of InformationHouse Economic Matters, Room 150, Lowe HOBHB 792 Maryland Small Business Development Financing Authority -- Small Business Surety Bond Program; HB 814 Financial Institutions -- Interest-Bearing Accounts -- Calculation and Accrual; HB 954 Maryland Defense Diversification...
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2000
Richard C. Mike Lewin doesn't plan to step completely out of Maryland's economic development picture. Lewin announced plans Wednesday to end his two-year run as secretary of the state Department of Business and Economic Development to return to the private sector. In an interview before addressing the Maryland Chamber of Commerce yesterday, he said any new employer must allow him to continue with efforts to improve Maryland's business climate. "They're going to have to give me ample time to work on public projects," Lewin said.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | December 10, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has temporarily derailed effort to lure to Maryland a multimillion dollar prototype for a magnetic levitation train route.So-called maglev trains are designed to ride on a cushion of magnetism and travel at speeds of 300 miles per hour or higher. They have so far only operated on test tracks in Europe and Japan.Page Boinest, the governor's press secretary, said yesterday that Mr. Schaefer wants to see greater support of existing forms of mass transit from the state's business community before he approves the state's $200,000 share of a proposed study.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2001
A group that wants to overturn Maryland's new gay rights law turned in its first batch of petitions yesterday as it seeks to take the issue to voters in November 2002. Take Back Maryland delivered referendum petitions, containing the signatures of at least 15,376 registered voters, by the midnight deadline to the Maryland secretary of state's office. The group faces a June 30 deadline to gather the rest of the total 46,128 signatures it needs to get the item on the ballot. The number required is 3 percent of the total votes cast for governor in the last election.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday introduced a 21-member Economic Development Commission, a group of private-sector leaders he said would help his administration set economic development strategy and attract businesses to the state.Also released at yesterday's State House news conference was the report of the governor's Economic Development Transition Group, which proposed a series of incremental changes, many of which were sounded during the governor's campaign last year."This is . . . a day that is going to put into motion a road map for Maryland's economic development," said the governor, who had announced his intention to name the development panel during his State of the State address last month.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2011
If there's a volunteer board working to promote economic development in northern Anne Arundel County, Michael Livingston probably serves on it, used to serve on it or has helped it out at one time or another. Livingston, the president and CEO of the Bank of Glen Burnie, now serves as chairman of the Anne Arundel Economic Development Corp. and as chairman of the Glen Burnie Town Center Advisory Committee. Under Livingston's direction, the bank has prospered through difficult economic times.
NEWS
By Anirban Basu | February 28, 2011
Viewed from an array of perspectives, Maryland's economy looks like a winner. During both the 2001 recession and the most recent economic downturn, Maryland's economy easily outperformed the nation's. For instance, during the earlier recession, Maryland's job loss was 15,800 jobs, or 0.6 percent of total nonfarm jobs at its pre-recession peak. By contrast, the nation lost 2 percent of its jobs, or 2.7 million. Maryland's advantage during the most recent recession was even more apparent.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2011
Steve Walters has a modest proposal that makes Baltimore homeowners cheer and government bean-counters wince: slash the city's property tax rate in half. The Loyola University Maryland economics professor, pointing to the modern rebirths of San Francisco and Boston after tax revolts forced drastic rate cuts three decades ago, has long argued that Baltimore would become a much healthier city if it followed suit voluntarily. More people would move in, he says. More owners would fix up dilapidated properties.
NEWS
By Phil Kerpen and Dave Schwartz | December 10, 2009
The global warming debate is at a crossroads, with a skeptical American public already rising up against a cap-and-trade scheme that would send energy prices through the roof, a whistle-blower at the influential Climate Research Unit revealing that the temperature data used to make the case for global warming were badly manipulated, predictions of yet another cold winter, and the fact it has been nearly a decade since global temperatures stopped rising....
NEWS
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Ideas Editor | January 7, 2007
Women across the nation frustrated by earning less than men now have an option that could quickly narrow the gap and help them move on to more substantial economic achievements. The answer: Move to Maryland. The District of Columbia, Maryland and Massachusetts stand out, in that order, as the best states in the nation for women economically, based on a broad array of statistical measures, assessed in a new study of federal data produced by the Institute for Women's Policy Research. Whether it's pay, business ownership, education or a number of other measures, Maryland women rank at or near the top, the study shows.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | November 8, 2006
Shucks, as a legal case it was a no-brainer, lawyer John C. Murphy said when I congratulated him on prying open the Baltimore Development Corp. to public view. And he's right. BDC is financed by government, controlled by government and instrumental in executing one of government's most fearsome powers: taking private property from one party and giving it to another. Of course, the people of Baltimore and Maryland should be able to scrutinize its machinations. It's amazing that BDC could block the sunshine so long - from its birth in 1991 until last week, when Murphy's west-side-business-owner clients won a critical case before Maryland's highest court.
NEWS
September 18, 1995
Nowhere will the changes in The Sun be more noticeable than in the Business section, which will be a freestanding section Tuesday through Friday and, of course, on Sunday. Space in the section has been increased significantly to provide authoritative coverage of the state and the region.Here's what to expect:MondayOn Mondays, readers will receive a special package of news about Maryland businesses and the local economy. Look for these features:* Every other Monday, staff writer Jay Hancock brings you up to date on how the economy is faring in the city and state.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1995
State economic development officials and Tessco Technologies Inc., the nation's leading wholesaler of wireless phone equipment, said yesterday that they are talking about a financial package that could keep the fast-growing Sparks-based company in Maryland.Gerald Garland, chief financial officer of Tessco, said the company is looking for a place to expand and consolidate its operations, which are split between a headquarters building in Sparks and a warehouse in Hunt Valley.Mr. Garland would not confirm rumors that his company is considering out-of-state alternatives, but neither would he deny them.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | December 22, 2005
Joseph G. Anastasi, a former Maryland economic development secretary who was active in numerous Democratic political campaigns, died of a brain tumor Tuesday at the Eugene B. Casey House, a Rockville hospice. He was 68. He began his political career chairing a Silver Spring business and citizen committee for John F. Kennedy's 1960 presidential campaign and went on to manage campaigns for two Maryland governors. "He was an extremely competent, capable man who was good to have working with you," former Gov. Marvin Mandel said yesterday.
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