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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Calling "campus violence a reality" to prepare for, the University of Maryland Eastern Shore announced plans Thursday to spend $60,000 on the Clark Kent of teacher supplies: an innocuous-looking white board that can stop bullets. The high-tech tablet - which hangs on a hook, measures 18 by 20 inches and comes in pink, blue and green - can be used as a personal shield for professors under attack, according to the company that makes it, and a portable writing pad in quieter times. "It needs to be a great whiteboard and a useful tool so that it doesn't get hidden in the closet," said maker George Tunis.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Coppin State University suffered a $2.5 million revenue shortfall this fall because of a drop in enrollment, and school officials said Tuesday that the deficit is being offset with cuts to the administration and other cost-saving measures rather than tuition increases. Coppin State spokeswoman Tiffany Jones said Tuesday that the school enrolled 3,133 students this fall, 250 less than a year ago. Tuition, plus fees, for in-state students is about $6,000. To offset part of the shortfall, a school vice president and an assistant vice president have been let go, Jones said.
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SPORTS
By Special to The Sun | January 26, 1992
PRINCESS ANNE -- The University of Maryland Eastern Shore, winless in 16 straight games this season, and 19 going back to last season, halted the streak with a 74-62 victory over Morgan State last night at Tawes Gymnasium.The Hawks, ahead by 39-35 at the half, maintained control the rest of the way. Marlin Kimbrew led UMES with 21 points, backed by Simon Edwards with 17. The UMES starters outscored their Morgan counterparts, 57-33. Brandon Parker had 16 points for the Bears.
NEWS
September 2, 2014
This week in Crime Scene, Matt Jablow looks at the unsolved murder of a popular University of Maryland Eastern Shore student. On the night of Feb. 16, 2013, Edmond St. Clair and two friends were on their way to pick up food when three men stopped their car. When St. Clair got out to confront the men, one of them stabbed him in the heart with a knife. Despite there being 20 to 30 people who saw the crime, the killer has yet to be identified.
NEWS
July 18, 2007
A viewing will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. today at Metropolitan United Methodist Church, 30522 Broad St., Princess Anne, for William Percy Hytche Sr., former president of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, who died Sunday at his home there. He was 78. There will be a viewing from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. tomorrow at the Ella Fitzgerald Center for the Performing Arts on the UMES campus in Princess Anne, where funeral services will follow at 11 a.m.
NEWS
September 2, 2014
This week in Crime Scene, Matt Jablow looks at the unsolved murder of a popular University of Maryland Eastern Shore student. On the night of Feb. 16, 2013, Edmond St. Clair and two friends were on their way to pick up food when three men stopped their car. When St. Clair got out to confront the men, one of them stabbed him in the heart with a knife. Despite there being 20 to 30 people who saw the crime, the killer has yet to be identified.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
The U.S. Department of Education has awarded more than $12.2 million to Maryland's four historically black colleges and universities, Sens. Ben Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski said Monday. The money is aimed at strengthening academic resources, management capabilities, and infrastructure at Coppin State University and Morgan State University in Baltimore, Bowie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore in Princess Anne. The federal grants include: •$3,890,115 for tutoring and counseling programs, an endowment, job training in underrepresented disciplines and faculty development and community outreach at Morgan State; •$3,001,959 to address the achievement gap for first-generation college students, increase enrollment, and begin to implement a strategic plan to improve educational offerings at Bowie State; •$2,774,743 to improve retention and graduation rates, academic programming, and minority participation in fields of science, technology, nursing, information technology, and geography at Coppin State; and •$2,535,354 for University of Maryland Eastern Shore to work toward becoming a leader in doctoral research by building upon access to education, recruitment and retention, engagement in research and development and addressing the achievement gap. matthew.brown@baltsun.com twitter.com/matthewhaybrown
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
A former leader of a national group of public universities has been named the interim president of Coppin State University, the state university system announced Wednesday. Mortimer H. Neufville, who until June had served as the interim president of University of Maryland Eastern Shore, will become the interim president Jan. 23 when the current president, Reginald S. Avery, steps down. Avery received a vote of no confidence from the faculty last year. He pledged to increase the university's low graduation rate when he arrived in 2008, only to see it continue to fall.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
A federal judge ruled Monday that Maryland hasn't done enough to help the state's four historically black colleges and universities overcome segregation-era policies that required separate programs for white and black students. In the ruling, U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake found that state universities have continued to unnecessarily duplicate the programs of the four historically black institutions, violating the constitutional rights of those students. Plaintiffs had argued that the historically black colleges were hurt because neighboring institutions offered similar programs, siphoning away students.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | April 17, 1997
We tend to think that art is centered in metropolitan ideas. Here comes an exhibit to show us it ain't necessarily so. At the Clayworks, "Edges and Boundaries" brings together ceramics by artists working in rural areas of Maryland. It includes sculpture, functional pottery and wall pieces by artists living as far afield as Frostburg, Salisbury, La Plata, Accokeek, Princess Anne, Thurmont and Gapland. The show was organized by Deborah Bedwell, Baltimore Clayworks' executive director, and after it closes in Baltimore, it will make an extensive tour of as many as eight other sites in Maryland, including Frostburg State University and University of Maryland Eastern Shore at Princess Anne.
SPORTS
By Pete Barrett and The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Coppin State men's basketball coach Fang Mitchell isn't too worried about seeding. The Eagles (9-18, 6-8 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference) sit in seventh place with just two games to play before the conference tournament, but with that he finds inspiration. “Look at last year,” Mitchell said. “North Carolina A&T came in as the 7th seed and wound up winning the conference championship. So, it is possible. We are optimistic.” Mitchell also hearkens back to 2008, when Coppin State grabbed the No. 7 seed and won the tournament.
SPORTS
By Pete Barrett and The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Fang Mitchell doesn't like Coppin State's Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference home record, and he doesn't know what to do about it.  "We're 2-2 in the conference at home, and that is not what I expected at this time," the coach said.  Coppin State (8-14), in sixth place in the MEAC, is 3-2 in conference play on the road. The Eagles will need to play better at home if they want to improve their seeding for the MEAC tournament, which starts on March 10. “We haven't played as well at home as we have on the road,” Mitchell said.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
State officials and attorneys representing Maryland's historically black colleges and universities will head to mediation to resolve the remnants of a legal battle spurred by the institutions' complaint that the state hasn't done enough to help them overcome segregation-era policies. Dori Henry, a spokeswoman for Gov. Martin O'Malley, said that the parties, have "agreed to attempt to mediate the remaining issue in the case," and that U.S. District Court Judge Paul W. Grimm will serve as the mediator.
NEWS
By George La Noue | October 27, 2013
U.S. District Court Judge Catherine Blake issued a long awaited, 60-page ruling this month in the case Coalition for Educational Equity and Excellence v. Maryland Higher Education Commission. The litigation was brought by supporters of Maryland's historically black institutions (HBIs), Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The plaintiffs argued that the state of Maryland had failed in its obligation under the 14th Amendment's Equal Protection Clause to desegregate its higher education system.
NEWS
October 13, 2013
A federal district court judge handed Maryland's historically black colleges and universities a partial and in many respects problematic victory last week. She denied them the monetary damages they sought but ruled that the state may not allow its traditionally white schools to unnecessarily duplicate their popular, unique academic programs. U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake said such duplication has the effect of perpetuating the inequalities inherent in the dual system of higher education established during the era of segregation, and thus illegally discriminates against black students.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Martin Ngwa, a student at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, plans to go into social work after graduation — though his school doesn't offer the major. Thanks to an unusual partnership between UMES, an historically black institution, and Salisbury University, its traditionally white neighbor, Ngwa is earning dual degrees in sociology and social work. The opportunity to take classes on both Eastern Shore campuses is the result of several decades of collaboration — a partnership that was praised this week in a federal court opinion that found some Maryland policies still promote "separate but equal" colleges and universities.
NEWS
July 27, 2003
On Tuesday, July 22, 2003, BRENDA E. SMITH, wife of Carl Edward Smith and daughter of Annie Gaylor Flood and the late Wardell Eaton, expired at her Mitchellville home, following a protracted illness. Born in March 15, 1946, she was the eldest of six siblings. The family lived in Cherry Hill and she attended school there. Brenda was a graduate of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and held a M.B.A. from the University of Baltimore. She taught in the Baltimore City Schools and for over twenty years had been an executive with Verizon, formerly the C&P Telephone Company, where she met her husband, now a retired Verizon Executive.
NEWS
By From Staff Report | April 8, 1995
University of Maryland's Board of Regents approved a new schedule of room and board charges for its 13 campuses, ranging from a 2.0 percent increase at the University of Maryland Baltimore County to a 13.3 percent increase at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Coppin State College and the University of Maryland at Baltimore proposed no increases. The University of Baltimore is not a residential campus.Unless otherwise specified, the rates for the 1995-1996 school year involve costs for a dormitory single and a plan offering 14 meals per week.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Presidents of the state's historically black colleges and universities said Tuesday that a federal court ruling ordering remedies for persistent segregative policies in Maryland higher education could result in new opportunities and resources for their campuses. "That could mean anything, it could mean Morgan could have a school of public health, it could mean Morgan could have a statewide center of nanotechnology," said Morgan State University President David Wilson, adding that he was still reviewing the opinion to determine its short- and long-term implications.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
A federal judge ruled Monday that Maryland hasn't done enough to help the state's four historically black colleges and universities overcome segregation-era policies that required separate programs for white and black students. In the ruling, U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake found that state universities have continued to unnecessarily duplicate the programs of the four historically black institutions, violating the constitutional rights of those students. Plaintiffs had argued that the historically black colleges were hurt because neighboring institutions offered similar programs, siphoning away students.
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