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By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
A judge from Prince George's County has been named the next chief judge of the state's District Court. Judge John P. Morrissey, 49, who has served as an associate judge since 2005, will succeed District Court Chief Judge Ben C. Clyburn when Clyburn retires next month. Morrissey, who was born in Washington, D.C. and has lived in P.G. County for more than 40 years, will oversee the court's 34 locations and nearly 2,000 employees, including 116 state judges. The court is typically the first point of contact for members of the public who interact with the state courts system.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
A judge from Prince George's County has been named the next chief judge of the state's District Court. Judge John P. Morrissey, 49, who has served as an associate judge since 2005, will succeed District Court Chief Judge Ben C. Clyburn when Clyburn retires next month. Morrissey, who was born in Washington, D.C. and has lived in P.G. County for more than 40 years, will oversee the court's 34 locations and nearly 2,000 employees, including 116 state judges. The court is typically the first point of contact for members of the public who interact with the state courts system.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
A company that insures bail bonds is suing Maryland's District Court for being too lenient on its own industry. What gives? Lexington National Insurance Corp. says the playing field on which it's competing with rival companies is not level. The Cockeysville company alleges in a lawsuit filed last month that the state courts have thrown away as much as $3 million by defying state law and not making competitors pay up when defendants jump bail or miss their court dates. Lexington National says in its lawsuit that the practice puts them "at a distinct competitive disadvantage" with noncompliant insurance companies because it regularly pays forfeited bail bond bills, as required by a 2011 law. Representatives for the District Court and Chief Clerk Roberta L. Warnken, who is listed as a co-defendant, declined to comment on the lawsuit.
NEWS
By Tamieka Briscoe, Capital News Service | February 27, 2014
Judge Robert C. Wilcox of Davidsonville retired in 2010, but after two months vacationing in Florida, he traded back the beach for the bench. "I love the law, and I like what I do," said Wilcox, 70, a retired judge of the Maryland District Court in Annapolis, where he continues to try cases two days a week. "When you do what you like, it's not work. " Wilcox belongs to a group the Maryland court system refers to as retired/recalled judges. Recalled judges work part time, not to exceed 82 days per year.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
A Maryland District Court judge dismissed more than 10,000 debt-collection cases against Maryland consumers Thursday, part of the terms of a settlement in a federal class action lawsuit against debt collector Midland Funding LLC. Chief Judge Ben C. Clyburn signed a motion to dismiss 10,168 cases of consumers who were sued in state court over unpaid credit card and other debt. Midland Funding, buyer and collector of debt, was accused in the U.S. District Court case of working as a debt collector without a state license.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
The Maryland District Court said Thursday that its chief judge has dismissed 3,168 debt-collection cases against state residents and ordered that any liens associated with those cases be released. The move, involving Worldwide Asset Purchasing cases, is a result of a settlement in a federal class-action suit. Attorneys for the plaintiffs alleged that the debt-buying firm wasn't licensed, sued for the wrong amounts, filed cases after the statute of limitations had expired, and included consumers' Social Security numbers in publicly available court filings, the state judiciary said.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 1, 2010
We, the people of Maryland, don't know our judges. Judges know judges. Lawyers know judges. Police officers know the judges of the Maryland District Court and, to some degree, the judges of the Circuit Court. I suppose the governors know the judges they appoint. But, for the most part, we don't know much about the judges who serve Baltimore and the counties of Maryland, though thousands of us have voted for dozens of them. It's time we paid more attention. Judge John Addison Howard's name has been in the news this past week; he's the Baltimore Circuit Court judge who had dealt leniently with John Wagner, the man accused in last Sunday's stabbing death of Stephen Pitcairn in Charles Village.
NEWS
By Tamieka Briscoe, Capital News Service | February 27, 2014
Judge Robert C. Wilcox of Davidsonville retired in 2010, but after two months vacationing in Florida, he traded back the beach for the bench. "I love the law, and I like what I do," said Wilcox, 70, a retired judge of the Maryland District Court in Annapolis, where he continues to try cases two days a week. "When you do what you like, it's not work. " Wilcox belongs to a group the Maryland court system refers to as retired/recalled judges. Recalled judges work part time, not to exceed 82 days per year.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Larry Carson and David Nitkin and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2001
Howard County District Judge James N. Vaughan, a 19-year veteran who has ordered criminals to read Les Miserables and invented a "maxim of red lights" for traffic cases, was named chief judge of Maryland's District Court system yesterday. Vaughan, 66, was appointed to one of the state's top three judicial positions by Court of Appeals Chief Judge Robert M. Bell. Vaughan takes his new post today, replacing Martha F. Rasin, who resigned to return to her previous job as a trial judge in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
April 10, 1996
An article in some editions yesterday incorrectly stated who appoints the chief judge of Maryland's District Court. The choice is made by the chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 4/10/96
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
A company that insures bail bonds is suing Maryland's District Court for being too lenient on its own industry. What gives? Lexington National Insurance Corp. says the playing field on which it's competing with rival companies is not level. The Cockeysville company alleges in a lawsuit filed last month that the state courts have thrown away as much as $3 million by defying state law and not making competitors pay up when defendants jump bail or miss their court dates. Lexington National says in its lawsuit that the practice puts them "at a distinct competitive disadvantage" with noncompliant insurance companies because it regularly pays forfeited bail bond bills, as required by a 2011 law. Representatives for the District Court and Chief Clerk Roberta L. Warnken, who is listed as a co-defendant, declined to comment on the lawsuit.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
The Maryland District Court said Thursday that its chief judge has dismissed 3,168 debt-collection cases against state residents and ordered that any liens associated with those cases be released. The move, involving Worldwide Asset Purchasing cases, is a result of a settlement in a federal class-action suit. Attorneys for the plaintiffs alleged that the debt-buying firm wasn't licensed, sued for the wrong amounts, filed cases after the statute of limitations had expired, and included consumers' Social Security numbers in publicly available court filings, the state judiciary said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
A Maryland District Court judge dismissed more than 10,000 debt-collection cases against Maryland consumers Thursday, part of the terms of a settlement in a federal class action lawsuit against debt collector Midland Funding LLC. Chief Judge Ben C. Clyburn signed a motion to dismiss 10,168 cases of consumers who were sued in state court over unpaid credit card and other debt. Midland Funding, buyer and collector of debt, was accused in the U.S. District Court case of working as a debt collector without a state license.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 1, 2010
We, the people of Maryland, don't know our judges. Judges know judges. Lawyers know judges. Police officers know the judges of the Maryland District Court and, to some degree, the judges of the Circuit Court. I suppose the governors know the judges they appoint. But, for the most part, we don't know much about the judges who serve Baltimore and the counties of Maryland, though thousands of us have voted for dozens of them. It's time we paid more attention. Judge John Addison Howard's name has been in the news this past week; he's the Baltimore Circuit Court judge who had dealt leniently with John Wagner, the man accused in last Sunday's stabbing death of Stephen Pitcairn in Charles Village.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Larry Carson and David Nitkin and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2001
Howard County District Judge James N. Vaughan, a 19-year veteran who has ordered criminals to read Les Miserables and invented his own "maxim of red lights" for traffic cases, was named chief judge of Maryland's district court system yesterday. Vaughan, 66, was appointed to one of the state's top three judicial positions by Court of Appeals Chief Judge Robert M. Bell. Vaughan takes his new post today, replacing Martha F. Rasin, who resigned to return to her previous job as a trial judge in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 25, 2001
Carroll County District Judge JoAnn Ellinghaus-Jones has been named administrative judge for District 10, which includes Howard and Carroll counties. Ellinghaus-Jones succeeds Judge James N. Vaughan, who left the post last week to become chief judge of Maryland's District Court system. Her appointment took effect Thursday. Ellinghaus-Jones was named to the bench in 1991 and was reappointed this year to a second 10-year term. As administrative judge, she will coordinate scheduling and handle personnel and commissioner-related issues, among other duties, in the seven-judge district.
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