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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- Mess with Ruth Hanessian's frogs, mess with Ruth Hanessian.The state Natural Resources Police went undercover last year and ticketed the Rockville pet shop owner for allegedly selling native frogs without a $25 permit.The state says the frogs are as Maryland as William Donald Schaefer.Hanessian says that unless her supplier snatched the tree frogs from a swamp here, smuggled them to Shanghai, China, then brought them to Maryland and charged her $2 apiece, the DNR is all wet.Actually, she uses much stronger language.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Since 1998, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources has taught more than 32,000 students in 1,200 classroom programs about the Chesapeake Bay, coastal and bay marine life, as well as the state's streams through its Teaching Environmental Awareness in Maryland (TEAM) program. DNR officials are looking for volunteers who want to learn about the program and then teach it to children in third through eighth grades in the state. Volunteers must be 18 years old and be able to provide their own transportation.
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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2001
THE EXPOSED picture hooks made the bare walls of Sarah Taylor-Rogers' spacious, top-floor office look even starker. Her personal stuff had all been carted out a few days earlier, after one of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's staff told her, without warning or explanation, that she was finished after two years as secretary of the Department of Natural Resources. Wearing one of her jaunty, trademark hats - a broad-brimmed straw number trimmed with a broad, black ribbon - Taylor-Rogers sat at a mostly empty desk, accepting calls of condolence and support; she was also checking on suddenly important details like her retirement status in the state system.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
Leaning over the edge of a motorboat on the Severn River yesterday, the four fisheries biologists grappled with the weight of their catch -- hundreds of shining perch squirming in a large, black net. Then, instead of rejoicing in the harvest, the men knelt silently by the flopping fish and began releasing them, dropping some over the boat's edge and throwing others over their shoulders into the water. The final count for the harvest: 64 yellow perch, 360 white perch and a smattering of catfish and pumpkinseed sunfish.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2000
PUZZLEY RUN -- Deep in a state forest near this Garrett County stream, a fluorescent pink ribbon marks the spot where local officials hope to find the water to supply a growing community and spur economic development in one of the poorest regions of Maryland. But the ribbon is attached to a metal stake driven into the ground under a hemlock tree in a Sensitive Management Area in Savage River State Forest, where a state management plan prohibits "resource extraction." Changes in that plan require public comment, yet the state Department of Natural Resources has granted the nearby town of Grantsville permission to drill a test well on the site without asking for public opinion.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
Leaning over the edge of a motorboat on the Severn River yesterday, the four fisheries biologists grappled with the weight of their catch -- hundreds of shining perch squirming in a large, black net. Then, instead of rejoicing in the harvest, the men knelt silently by the flopping fish and began releasing them, dropping some over the boat's edge and throwing others over their shoulders into the water. The final count for the harvest: 64 yellow perch, 360 white perch and a smattering of catfish and pumpkinseed sunfish.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Since 1998, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources has taught more than 32,000 students in 1,200 classroom programs about the Chesapeake Bay, coastal and bay marine life, as well as the state's streams through its Teaching Environmental Awareness in Maryland (TEAM) program. DNR officials are looking for volunteers who want to learn about the program and then teach it to children in third through eighth grades in the state. Volunteers must be 18 years old and be able to provide their own transportation.
NEWS
April 14, 2008
On April 10, 2008, Sue L. Van Besien, The family will receive friends at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26) on Monday from 4-8 pm. Services and Interment are private. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to Tree-Mendous Maryland, Department of Natural Resources Forest Service, Tawes State Office Building, E-1, Annapolis, MD 21401.
NEWS
August 25, 1991
Earl Millett of Odenton and Michael Wangdahl of Arnold recently attended a weeklong Forestry, Conservation and Natural Resources WorkshopCamp in Garrett County.Run by the Maryland Department of NaturalResources, 46 students attended the workshop, geared for college-bound high school students interested in pursuing careers in forestry and conservation.Wangdahl, 17, is a June graduate of Broadneck High School and will attend Anne Arundel Community College in September. Millett, 16, will be a senior at Arundel High School.
NEWS
May 8, 1992
Texaco's right to drill for natural gas or oil in Southern Maryland was upheld today by an Anne Arundel County court, which dismissed environmentalists' objections.Circuit Court Judge Warren B. Duckett ruled that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources acted properly in issuing Texaco a permit in December to drill a 10,000-foot deep exploratory well near Faulkner in Charles County.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2001
THE EXPOSED picture hooks made the bare walls of Sarah Taylor-Rogers' spacious, top-floor office look even starker. Her personal stuff had all been carted out a few days earlier, after one of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's staff told her, without warning or explanation, that she was finished after two years as secretary of the Department of Natural Resources. Wearing one of her jaunty, trademark hats - a broad-brimmed straw number trimmed with a broad, black ribbon - Taylor-Rogers sat at a mostly empty desk, accepting calls of condolence and support; she was also checking on suddenly important details like her retirement status in the state system.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2000
PUZZLEY RUN -- Deep in a state forest near this Garrett County stream, a fluorescent pink ribbon marks the spot where local officials hope to find the water to supply a growing community and spur economic development in one of the poorest regions of Maryland. But the ribbon is attached to a metal stake driven into the ground under a hemlock tree in a Sensitive Management Area in Savage River State Forest, where a state management plan prohibits "resource extraction." Changes in that plan require public comment, yet the state Department of Natural Resources has granted the nearby town of Grantsville permission to drill a test well on the site without asking for public opinion.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- Mess with Ruth Hanessian's frogs, mess with Ruth Hanessian.The state Natural Resources Police went undercover last year and ticketed the Rockville pet shop owner for allegedly selling native frogs without a $25 permit.The state says the frogs are as Maryland as William Donald Schaefer.Hanessian says that unless her supplier snatched the tree frogs from a swamp here, smuggled them to Shanghai, China, then brought them to Maryland and charged her $2 apiece, the DNR is all wet.Actually, she uses much stronger language.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 12, 1996
ANNAPOLIS -- The Maryland Department of Natural Resources cited six recreational boaters for intoxicated boating during a random check Friday and Saturday on the South River, a DNR spokesman said.DNR officers performed safety checks on 92 boats between the Route 2 bridge and the Riva Road bridge, Anne Arundel County's busiest boating thoroughfare, the spokesman said.Pub Date: 8/12/96
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