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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2011
A suspicious pattern of bidding on state grants for installing less-polluting septic systems - part of a wide-ranging critique of the Maryland Department of the Environment - has prompted legislative auditors to call for a criminal investigation. In a report released Thursday, auditors found a series of fiscal, management and regulatory problems at the agency, including potential violations of state law for hiring a retiring employee as a consultant. The audit also faulted the department's handling of a computer system upgrade and oversight of construction sites, hazardous-materials facilities and rental housing containing lead paint.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland has filed a federal employment discrimination complaint against a Maryland hair salon on behalf of an employee who says he was fired for being HIV-positive. Representatives for Ratner Cos., which owns the Hair Cuttery in Greenbelt, said in a statement he was fired for "repeated inappropriate behavior," including verbally abusing co-workers in front of clients. A company document outlining his HIV status as the cause for his termination — which the ACLU included in the complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission — "inaccurately described the reason for his dismissal," they said.
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BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2009
SALARY: $46,000 AGE: 29 TIME ON THE JOB: 6 months How she got started: : Amy Crone graduated from Cornell University with a degree in government and Latin-American relations. She went on to earn a graduate degree from American University in international development. Most recently she worked as a research and policy analyst for the Center for Global Development, a nonprofit think tank in Washington. She researched ways to administer foreign assistance to developing nations. During her off hours, she managed the FRESHFARM Market in Annapolis.
NEWS
October 7, 2014
It is time to plug the loopholes for coal-fired power plants in Maryland ( "New coal plant pollution controls eyed," Sept. 13). A report by the Maryland Department of the Environment found that many of the coal fired power plants in Maryland had not used their pollution controls continuously. If the Brandon Shores and Wagner plants had used their controls continuously in 2012, they could have cut nitrous oxide emissions by 2,000 tons. So what's the problem with nitrous oxide?
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 22, 2013
Talk about leading by example -- the Maryland Department of the Environment announced Monday that it would begin collecting food scraps at its Baltimore headquarters for composting. The Earth Day announcement comes on the heels of Howard County launching its own food-scrap processing facility, which I covered here for The Baltimore Sun. MDE will give its 900-plus employees the option to compost their uneaten food at the agency's main offices in Montgomery Park. Officials there say they hope in the effort's inaugural year to divert more than 6 tons of waste that might otherwise have gone to an incinerator or landfill.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1999
David A. Coleman has learned the hard way that Maryland consumers expect to get as much as they pay for -- in his case a cord of firewood.The Sudlersville resident, who sells firewood from his home, was recently sentenced to two months in jail for not delivering the full measure of oak firewood."
NEWS
September 29, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley's call for state agencies to identify 5 percent of their budgets that might be cut would seem to be a prudent exercise in the face of so much economic uncertainty. But there's at least one agency where officials would be wise to tread lightly. The Maryland Department of the Environment has been slowly chipping away at a different kind of deficit - a chronic lack of resources to adequately enforce anti-pollution laws. It's a problem that's worsened over much of the last decade and runs completely counter to recent efforts to expand the agency's mission to address such issues as climate change and poultry farm runoff.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
One of the more well-known, but less understood, rules about oysters says that they should be eaten only during months that have an "R," so from May to August, they should be off the menu. This guideline goes back hundreds of years and is rooted in lack of reliable refrigeration and a need to allow oysters to reproduce during the summer months. When oysters reproduce, they become weak and may be susceptible to disease. Today, thanks to modern refrigeration and the development of new breeds of oysters that do not reproduce in the summer, oysters are fine to eat any time.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
State health officials have suspended surgical abortion procedures at three clinics, including one in Baltimore where a patient suffered cardiac arrest and later died at a hospital. The physician who performed the abortion at Associates in OB/GYN Care LLC on North Calvert Street wasn't certified in CPR and a defibrillator at the facility did not work, state officials said in a letter Friday to the General Assembly. Although the cardiac arrest was caused by underlying health conditions and not the abortion, investigators found that it raised questions whether doctors at the clinic can handle an abortion that goes wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
April 1 is the official start to the blue crab harvest in Maryland. But don't reach for your mallet just yet. "It's not time for crabs," said Jessica Borowski, a manager at Midtown BBQ and Brew. "It's too cold out. " The crabs seem to agree. The Chesapeake Bay's water temperature hasn't risen enough for the crabs to become active - and catchable. Consumers set on Maryland crabs will see limited availability for now - and prices to match. Prices for Chesapeake Bay crabs are typically high at the start of the season, and people who want them in April will have to pay even more than usual.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
J.J. Reidy boarded a garish yellow RV parked in Harbor East and shared a vision: vast greenhouses in Baltimore raising produce to feed thousands, the plants feeding on nutrients from the waste of fish swimming in nearby tanks. In two minutes and 35 seconds of video time, the graduate business student and would-be entrepreneur delivered the pitch he fashioned with his business partner, Julie Buisson, wrapping it up with a punchy closing line: "We believe we can feed our city in our city.
NEWS
By Ivan Leshinsky | October 1, 2014
The number of young people arrested and brought to the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services (DJS) is down drastically over the past 10 years. Fewer juveniles are being placed in secure detention facilities, and plans for construction of a new juvenile jail in Baltimore City have been shelved, at least temporarily. Some contend that the reduction in the numbers of youth charged and detained is more about revised policing policies than anything else. We've seen the end of zero tolerance, and "youth connection centers" (YCCs)
ENTERTAINMENT
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The decades-long decline in lead-poisoned children in Maryland has essentially stalled, but state officials said Thursday they are taking steps in the coming months to address gaps in the marathon effort to eliminate the environmental health threat. Statewide, 2,622 youngsters up to age 6 were found to have harmful levels of lead in their blood last year, according to an annual report just released by the Maryland Department of the Environment. That's down 4 percent from 2012, though the number of children with seriously elevated lead levels grew slightly, from 364 to 371. Exposure to even minute amounts of lead can harm still-developing brains and nervous systems of young children, leading to learning and behavioral problems.
NEWS
By Donald Boesch and Edward Maibach | September 25, 2014
George Mason University research, released jointly with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, shows that roughly three quarters of Marylanders understand that climate change is a threat to our health, homes, businesses and natural resources, and more than half of them support state initiatives to address the problem. Now, with elections less than two months away, it's time to ensure we continue to move forward. Maryland is highly vulnerable, with more than 3,000 miles of coastline.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
The Maryland Department of the Environment recently revealed a draft rule that would finally require coal-powered plants in the Baltimore-Washington region to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by 48 percent over the next four years ( "New coal plant pollution controls eyed," Sept. 13). Nitrogen oxides contribute heavily to the formation of ground-level ozone (smog) and seriously exacerbate cardiopulmonary health problems such as asthma. Smog is worse when air is still and hot, but 2014 has been relatively cool so there have been fewer "orange alerts" for dangerous air. But Maryland still has some of the worst air on the Eastern seaboard, due largely to coal.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
As an unusual strain of virus continues its march across the country — showing up most recently in Pennsylvania and Virginia — health officials in Maryland are warning doctors to be on the lookout and advising parents to prepare. Enterovirus is common, with millions in the United States sickened every year, most with mild cases. But the relatively rare strain called EV-D68 can cause severe respiratory illness in children with asthma or other health conditions, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2011
Two doctors who Maryland authorities say botched an abortion last year in Elkton have been indicted on murder charges - in what appears to be the first use of the state's fetal homicide law involving a medical professional performing surgery. "We're in uncharted territory," Cecil County State's Attorney Edward D.E. Rollins said Friday. He declined to comment further because the indictment remains sealed until the suspects are arraigned in Maryland. They were arrested Wednesday in New Jersey and in Utah.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | February 25, 2009
When the water is cold, the fish that swim in it taste better. That is the theory that fishmongers like Billy Isaac Martin, proprietor of Martin Seafood in Jessup, told me. "The cellular structure of fish is denser, more tender in cold water," he said. Therefore, he said, the winter is a good time to buy rockfish. That might be a fish story, but I bought it. Rockfish, also known as striped bass, seem to me to have better flavor when the temperature drops. In the winter, local watermen do retrieve the fish from the Chesapeake Bay, provided the weather and state rules permit it. Rockfish have rebounded from prior shortages, but there is a quota on the catch.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Looking to protect Marylanders from unsafe levels of smog, environmental regulators are moving to clamp down on pollution from the state's smaller coal-burning power plants, but plant owners warn that the rule could have economic consequences. The Maryland Department of the Environment recently unveiled a draft rule two years in the planning that would require coal-burning plants in the Baltimore and Washington areas to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides by 48 percent over the next four years.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
The Maryland Department of Transportation has been awarded $10 million in federal funding to widen a stretch of Route 175 in Anne Arundel County that is contributing to congestion around an expanding Fort Meade. The Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery or TIGER grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation will be used to widen the heavily-used corridor between Disney and Reece roads, U.S. Sens. Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin, both Maryland Democrats, announced Tuesday.
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