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By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
NEW YORK -- During their bus ride here Sunday, members of the Maryland delegation used the intercom system to introduce themselves and to talk briefly about expectations for the Democratic convention.When John Stuban's name was called, someone said, "He's the guy with the earrings."Mr. Stuban stood and said, "To those who may have been wondering and who may have put two and two together, I'm queer."The word he chose for his introduction, he said, "is a harsh one, but it's softer when gay people use it. We do it to take the sting away from it when you're called queer by heterosexual people."
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
Del. Emmett Burns, a Baltimore minister, directed his Sunday sermon at the children of his congregation, warning them to be careful in their dealings with police, after a white officer killed an unarmed 18-year-old black man in Ferguson, Mo., last week. Burns, 73, who marched in the civil rights movement with activist Medgar Evers, echoed the sentiments of protesters in the St. Louis suburb and around the nation decrying the shooting of Michael Brown, but he said blacks need to recognize that they still face inequality.
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NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 3, 2004
NEW YORK - Maryland Republicans return home today energized for the final two-month push to Election Day but aware that they're on their own in an uphill effort to deliver the state's electoral votes to President Bush. State GOP delegates spent much of the week here trying to convince themselves and others that Maryland is winnable for the president and that a 12-point lead Democratic nominee John Kerry held in the most recent statewide poll could quickly be erased. "This is the Maryland that voted for Bob Ehrlich.
SPORTS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Five members of Maryland's congressional delegation said for the first time Friday they believe the punishment handed down to Ravens running back Ray Rice by the NFL is insufficient, adding to a growing chorus of elected officials who are raising questions about league commisioner Roger Goodell's decision. “Domestic violence carries a stigma, and the little to no punishment many abusers receive only strengthens that stigma and further endangers victims,” said Baltimore Rep. Elijah E. Cummings.
NEWS
By Geoffrey C. Upton and Geoffrey C. Upton,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Maryland's congressional Democrats fared well and Republicans poorly in a "report card" issued yesterday by the NAACP that reviewed votes in Congress on affirmative action and other issues important to the Baltimore-based civil rights group.Speaking at a news conference, NAACP President Kweisi Mfume urged the group's members to seek the ouster this fall of lawmakers who received low grades."We intend to use this information as a sword to defeat delinquent legislators of both parties," Mfume, a former Democratic congressman from Baltimore, said of the biannual survey.
NEWS
August 26, 1993
When Congress returns from its summer break, the hottest item on its agenda will be the pending North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada. The White House waited until lawmakers were away from Washington before concluding side accords fulfilling President Clinton's campaign pledge to add environmental and labor standards safeguards to the agreement.Now Mr. Clinton has the task of containing a rebellion in his own Democratic Party, one that has already seen the defection of House Majority Leader Richard Gephardt.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 15, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- As television cameras followed Jack Kemp across the convention floor Tuesday night, Victor Clark, a member of the Maryland delegation, tried to make himself conspicuous."
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | December 9, 2004
Republican U.S. Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett broke with his party - and the rest of the Maryland delegation - to vote against the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 this week. All seven of the state's other representatives voted for the bill, which was passed by the House in a 336-75 vote Tuesday. Maryland Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes voted in favor of the measure yesterday in the Senate. The bill, based on the recommendations of the 9/11 Commission, will create a national intelligence director, set up a counter-terrorism center and a civil liberties oversight board, increase the number of immigration agents, and upgrade aviation security, border control and cargo inspection measures.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Stephanie Hanes and Michael Dresser and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO -- Maryland lawmakers will wind up a five-day conference with legislators from across the country today after a week that has been heavier on policy and lighter on perks than in past years. About 60 Maryland lawmakers traveled here for the annual meeting of the National Conference of State Legislatures -- many of them drawn by a Montgomery County delegate's ascension into the top ranks of the organization. A midsized state, Maryland sent the third-largest delegation to this year's gathering, according to Del. John Adams Hurson, a Montgomery County Democrat who will be installed as the organization's president-elect today.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | April 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- After three months in office, this much is clear about Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett: He is playing better at home than in Washington.During his first 100 days in office, he has managed to offend Asians, feminists and fellow members of Maryland's delegation to Congress. But the 66-year-old Republican, elected to Congress at an age when most Americans are retiring, shows no signs of becoming part of the Washington establishment.He makes it clear that he sees Congress, government and those who rely financially on government as the enemy.
NEWS
January 1, 2014
In the Maryland General Assembly, newly-elected lawmakers inevitably have one experience in common. Republican or Democrat, liberal or conservative, rural or urban, it doesn't matter. When they arrive at the State House, they soon discover that the management of government and the issues they face are a lot more complicated than what they'd envisioned on the campaign trail. That's not to suggest first-term legislators are ill-informed or uneducated. Often, they are well suited for the job - better than their predecessors in many cases.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2013
Emmett Burns has been protesting since he was 15. The Maryland delegate and Lochearn preacher was born in Jackson, Miss., where he picketed in 1966 with Medgar Evers, an NAACP demonstrator who was instrumental in the desegregation of the University of Mississippi. Burns says he is a "proud jailbird," following his arrest in Washington during an anti-apartheid march in the early 1980s. All his life, he has tried to emulate the example of Nelson Mandela, the former South African president who ended apartheid and was buried Sunday.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Maryland's U.S. House delegation met Wednesday with Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki to keep pressure on the agency to fix problems at the troubled Baltimore office and follow up on promises for improvement. Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, a Southern Maryland Democrat who is House minority whip, said Maryland veterans should call their congressmen to report troubles with the regional office, which has one of the nation's highest error rates and largest percentages of backlogged cases.
NEWS
By Patrick Maynard | February 7, 2013
As Senate Intelligence Committee members file into room 216 of the Hart office building in Washington for a CIA confirmation hearing this afternoon, they will be under a spotlight much brighter than they anticipated last week. That was before a Monday NBC report unveiled leaked documentation from the Obama administration strongly implying that extrajudicial drone killings of American citizens abroad are made casually, with little meaningful oversight or geographic restriction.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 10, 2012
People who were paying attention in history class when the teacher got to "civil rights movement" must be astonished that an African-American minister with gray hair - a man who was state director of the NAACP in his native Mississippi and regional director of the organization in Maryland - could not only oppose extending equal rights to gay couples but advocate quashing the First Amendment rights of a pro football player. But that's how it goes in the irrational and fear-driven world of the Rev. Emmett C. Burns Jr., a member of the House of Delegates, and many other people who have a problem with homosexuality.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
TAMPA, Fla. -- Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who is something of a celebrity at the Republican National Convention this week, had a message today for the Maryland delegation: Take heart. Walker, who became a hero of the conservative movement after surviving a high-profile recall attempt in June, noted that Republicans in Wisconsin had once been heavily outgunned by Democrats, too. This year, the state is home to the party's vice presidential nominee, Paul Ryan, and is considered a tossup.
NEWS
December 3, 2003
STATE AND LOCAL political leaders' journey to Michigan on Monday was a welcome show of bipartisan support for creative approaches to saving the more than 1,100 high-paying manufacturing jobs now at Baltimore's General Motors plant on Broening Highway. The future of the 68-year-old Broening plant is now so bleak that it requires the unusual specter of Maryland's leading bitter rivals - Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and his potential opponent in the next gubernatorial race, Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley - joining together in a lobbying campaign.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
Maryland Republicans converge on Tampa this week to cast their ballots for former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and get energized for the November election against President Barack Obama. "There's just a huge enthusiasm for the Romney-Ryan team, and we're glad to be a part of that," said state Del. Kathy Szeliga, a member of the Maryland delegation to the Republican National Convention. "Even though it's very tough for Romney to get elected here in Maryland, we feel like across the country his message is right: 'It's the economy, and we're the party that's going to turn it around.'" As Szeliga notes, the GOP ticket is likely to be a tough sell in Maryland.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2012
Eight of Maryland's 10 members of Congress voted against a bi-partisan plan Friday to extend a national payroll tax holiday - including two who were instrumental in crafting the deal - citing concern over how the measure would affect federal employees. The only Maryland Democrat to support the measure, which ultimately passed both chambers, was Baltimore County Rep.C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger. The deal was also supported by Republican Rep.Roscoe G. Bartlett, who said he almost changed his vote.
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