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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
Is your Maryland crab cake true blue? Only a small number of restaurants in Maryland reliably make their crab cakes from local crabmeat, and the state does not require restaurants to identify the specific source of the meat in crab cakes. True Blue, a new  labeling and promotion initiative from The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR), hopes to give restaurants that do use Maryland crabmeat a claw up on those that fill their crab cakes with inexpensive imported meat from Indonesia and Venezuela.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 8, 2014
An overwhelming majority of Marylanders are worried about pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, a new poll finds, and most are concerned enough about the bay's slumping crabs to back a moratorium on crabbing. The survey by Goucher College found 84 percent of those contacted last week said they were very or somewhat concerned about bay pollution. Just 14 percent said it worried them little or not at all. The 708 Marylanders interviewed by telephone were only a little more upbeat about the overall health of the state's environment - 62 percent rated it fair to poor, while 36 percent consider it good to excellent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
More than 50 restaurants have signed onto the Maryland's 'True Blue' certification program and marketing campaign. Launched this spring by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the 'True Blue' certification program allows restaurants serving DNR-verified Maryland blue crab products to use a special logo in marketing or advertising the product. 'True Blue' wasn't so much designed to convert restaurant owners and diners to Maryland crab meat as it was to help diners who want Maryland crab meat find restaurants that serve it. “We're not saying that imported crab meat can't be delicious,” said DNR Fisheries Marketing Director Steve Vilnit when the program was announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The recipe is familiar, but with a fresh twist. Mix the salty, crunchy goodness of traditional munchies with the spicy kick reminiscent of Maryland's steamed crabs - and add the power of several professional Baltimore athletes for good measure - and you've got a new line of snacks with hometown flavor. Crab-inspired cheese curls, buttery popcorn and sunflower seeds are some of the product offerings from Home Team Snacks, headquartered in Carroll County. Launched in 2012, the company is the brainchild of Marc Heyman and Jeff Hinton, 49-year-old Baltimore-area natives who grew up in Mount Washington and Catonsville, respectively.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
The Maryland Crab and Oyster Celebration continues through Sunday. Look for chefs' specials featuring Maryland crab and oyster at some 20 restaurants. Alewife is dishing up a smoked tomato gazpacho topped with Maryland crab and roasted corn relish; Charleston is serving Cindy Wolf's signature cornmeal-fried oysters with lemon-cayenne mayonnaise; and Ryleigh's Oyster in Federal Hill is offering anywhere from seven to 14 varieties of raw oysters every day. For a full list of participating restaurants, along with their special menu items, go to the Dine Downtown Baltimore website . Follow Baltimore Diner on Twitter @gorelickingood
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN REPORTER | October 25, 2006
Crab soup is like mother's milk to Marylanders, who are likely to begin any seafood feast with a cup of steaming tomatoes and vegetables that are host to chunks of gleaming crab meat. Cream of crab soup, with its thick base of cream and its hint of sherry, certainly has its devotees. But there is something common, and comforting, about the spicy vegetable soup, especially at harvest time. Overripe tomatoes, the last of the Maryland sweet corn, fresh beans and limas and our old friend Old Bay make this soup a winner - literally - at seafood festivals and cooking contests.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 1, 1997
SHEILA LUKINS HAS made a considerable impact on the great wide world of cuisine. She has written several cookbooks, including "The Silver Palate Cookbook" (Workman, 1982), a tremendously successful work that, among other innovations, called for soaking chicken in a marinade that combined prunes and olives.In the narrow world of Maryland crab-cake making, however, she may be remembered as the woman who advocated putting lobster, capers and orange zest in crab cakes. That is what her new cookbook, "U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2012
Good old Rusty Scupper. The Inner Harbor restaurant with the sweeping views opened way back in 1982. It has grown. Two major renovations have added private rooms and a 1,200-bottle wine cellar. In commemoration of its 30th anniversary, the Rusty Scupper is offering a fixed-price, two-course lunch for $19.82. The special, which runs until the end of April, features items from the restaurant's original menu. Appetizer choices include a cup of cream of crab soup, a cup of Maryland crab soup, Scupper house salad and a traditional Caesar salad.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Special to the Sun | July 9, 2008
Picture a steamed crab encrusted with Old Bay seasoning, an ear of Silver Queen corn, a cold Natty Boh served with a handful of Utz potato chips - and a hot summer night in Baltimore leaps to mind. Step back, though, and the relationship between food and place becomes less fixed. Today, the crabs may come from Thailand, the "Silver Queen" is probably a more durable variety with a less-resonant name, and National Bohemian, once the Baltimore Orioles' "official" beer, now is brewed in North Carolina.
SPORTS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun Reporter | January 11, 2007
There is more riding on Saturday's playoff game between the Ravens and Indianapolis Colts than bragging rights or a chance to advance to the AFC championship game. For two mayors, there is also dinner -- and a potentially pricey dinner, at that. Baltimore Mayor and Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley and Indianapolis Mayor Bart Peterson, continuing the tradition among city leaders of backing up their teams with something more than words, set a "friendly wager" yesterday on the game. Peterson is throwing some midwestern steak into the pot; O'Malley, a Maryland crab cake dinner.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
While I seldom agree with columnist Dan Rodricks , his commentary on the Chesapeake Bay's declining crab population hit the nail on the head ( "It's time to stop tinkering and just ban crabbing for one year," May 3). My family is from the Eastern Shore, and I grew up appreciating the marvelous bounty that comes from the Chesapeake Bay. However, the bay needs a rest. A three-year moratorium on crab harvesting would be ideal, but I'll take whatever I can get. Additionally, there should be a permanent ban on commercial harvesting of female crabs.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 5, 2014
Did you ever wonder if a restaurant's crabcake was made with Maryland crab or some foreign import? Or if that was really red snapper you bought, or an impostor?  A bill introduced Wednesday in Annapolis would make it illegal for restaurants or markets to mislabel the seafood they sell, and moreover would require them to specify where their crabmeat came from. "If I go to a restaurant and order a 'Maryland-style' crabcake, I'd like to know if it's made with Venezuelan crabmeat," said Del. Eric G. Luedtke , the bill's sponsor.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Some dozen Baltimore restaurants are featuring special dishes local as part of the Maryland Crab & Oyster Celebration, a promotional dining event organized by Dine Downtown Baltimore. The promotion ends on officially Nov. 3, but some of these crab and oyster dishes will stick around, at least while oysters and crab are in season. View the full photo gallery here  
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | October 7, 2013
Eleven local football players, including six linemen, were added to the roster for the Maryland Crab Bowl after Monday night's second draft. The Baltimore area now has 24 seniors headed to the sixth annual all-star game, which is still scheduled for Dec. 21 but has been moved to McDaniel College in Westminster.  More players will be added at a later date. The game pits the Baltimore area's top seniors against Washington, D.C.'s best. Baltimore won last year, 28-7, but Washington holds a 3-2 edge in the series.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
For many Marylanders, there is no more perfect meal than a pile of steamed crabs or a well-made crab cake (light on filler, please). These straightforward crab preparations are everywhere: on restaurant menus and backyard tables, especially in the summer months. Their simplicity shows off crabmeat's sweet, delicate flavor and tender texture. But Maryland's crabby culinary history runs deeper than newspaper-covered tables and piles of discarded shells. Not long ago, restaurant menus listed numerous crab dishes, and home cooks were familiar with dozens of ways to incorporate crabs into meals, from casseroles to imperials.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
Heading to a crab house for a feast is fun, but nothing beats an afternoon of crabs in the backyard. Here are some tips for planning a feast of your own: Dress the part: Crab feasts are a dirty business; expect to get messy. Jen Harris, an upstate New York native who moved to Baltimore in 2010, learned this the hard way at her first crab feast. "Do not wear a dry clean-only blouse with white jeans," she warns. "Wear clothing you don't care about. " Set the table: Long, outdoor tables are ideal for crab feasting, but any table covered in newspaper or brown paper will do. Set mallets, knives and rolls of paper towels within easy grabbing distance of pickers (experienced pickers will appreciate bowls of water for hand-rinsing, too)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | January 24, 2002
A classic Baltimore restaurant, Angelina's (7135 Harford Road), will be celebrating its 50th anniversary this Valentine's Day. It's an impressive milestone for an unpretentious neighborhood place -- an Irish pub known for its Italian food and lump crab cake. Everything is made on the premises, including the rolls and desserts. As for that crab cake, often voted Baltimore's best, Angelina's has signed an agreement (!) with the Maryland Department of Agriculture to use only domestic blue crab.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
While I seldom agree with columnist Dan Rodricks , his commentary on the Chesapeake Bay's declining crab population hit the nail on the head ( "It's time to stop tinkering and just ban crabbing for one year," May 3). My family is from the Eastern Shore, and I grew up appreciating the marvelous bounty that comes from the Chesapeake Bay. However, the bay needs a rest. A three-year moratorium on crab harvesting would be ideal, but I'll take whatever I can get. Additionally, there should be a permanent ban on commercial harvesting of female crabs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
April 1 is the official start to the blue crab harvest in Maryland. But don't reach for your mallet just yet. "It's not time for crabs," said Jessica Borowski, a manager at Midtown BBQ and Brew. "It's too cold out. " The crabs seem to agree. The Chesapeake Bay's water temperature hasn't risen enough for the crabs to become active - and catchable. Consumers set on Maryland crabs will see limited availability for now - and prices to match. Prices for Chesapeake Bay crabs are typically high at the start of the season, and people who want them in April will have to pay even more than usual.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
Remember how everyone threw on all their purple and hauled their spirited selves down to the Harbor Monday to see the Ravens off? Well, the "Today Show" folks are hoping at least some of them will be back there Friday as they film live to show off Baltimore's Super Bowl pride. Natalie Morales will be representing the 'Today' crew at the Inner Harbor amphitheater from 7 to 10 a.m. while Al Roker does the same thing from San Francisco. They'll want to see screaming, passionate fans of purple.
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