Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaryland Court
IN THE NEWS

Maryland Court

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 1, 2012
Doesn't the Maryland Court of Appeals decision that pit bulls are inherently dangerous constitute profiling? David F. Tufaro, Baltimore
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 19, 2014
Levi Watkins, the pioneering cardiac surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, remembers the date — January 15 — because it was the anniversary of the birth of Martin Luther King Jr., and because what happened that night still makes him ache. It was 1979, and Watkins, the first black chief resident in cardiac surgery at Hopkins, had just left his office after conferring with a senior medical student named Alan Trimakas. They had agreed on the subject of a research project — cardiac neoplasms, tumors of the heart or heart valves.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 15, 2013
Where do I begin? The Maryland Court of Appeals has ruled that the state's mandatory five-year, no parole sentence for gun possession by certain convicted felons cannot stand ("Court voids gun penalty," July 12). As the article noted, "The Court of Appeals ruling in a Baltimore case erased a defendant's mandatory sentence and ordered him resentenced under a more lenient provision of the law. " Isn't it ironic that the case involves Baltimore, a city that is under siege, a city in which runs the blood of both the criminal and the innocent in its streets?
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 5, 2014
The tree still lives at the corner of Wolfe and Monument streets, in the midst of the sprawling Johns Hopkins Hospital complex of East Baltimore. The tree lives in memory of Alan Trimakas, a medical student who never got to be the doctor he wanted to be and that the world surely needed. Classmates of Trimakas planted the tree a few months after his senseless, infuriating death. A senior in the Hopkins medical school, Trimakas specialized in internal medicine and cardiology; he wanted to be a cardiologist.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2012
Noel Tshiani wasn't at his wedding — he listened by phone in another country to the ceremony in the Democratic Republic of Congo, according to court records — but he's just as married as if he'd stood at his bride's side. And soon, he'll be just as divorced and responsible for alimony and child support, a Maryland court has ruled. A World Bank employee, Tshiani was working in another African country when he and Marie-Louise Tshiani married in a 1993 ceremony. He answered questions and listened to the ceremony by telephone, while his cousin stood in his place for the ceremony, court records say. The exchange among families included money, clothes and a goat, and within days, the bride flew to join her husband, according to court records.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 26, 2014
In the two years since the Maryland Court of Appeals ruled that pit bulls were inherently dangerous dogs, I developed a hobby: Pit Bull Google. It's a very edifying activity. Anyone with access to the Internet can do it. You click on Google News to get the search engine's most recent results. You enter the words "pit bull," and "attack" or "police. " (If you only enter "pit bull" you get the latest concert reviews for the rapper known as Pitbull.) Without fail, the search turns up a news story about a vicious dog attack somewhere in the U.S. within the last four to 48 hours.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2013
Maryland's highest-ranking judge, Robert M. Bell, likes that his courthouse is dedicated to his predecessor, pointing out that the letters etching Robert C. Murphy's name on the building's exterior are filled in gold paint to make sure even nighttime drivers can see it. As Bell approaches retirement, mandatory when he turns 70 in July, he scoffs at the notion that his name might someday grace a building as well. But then, his name is forever etched in legal history by virtue of the Supreme Court case Bell v. Maryland.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
The Maryland District Court said Thursday that its chief judge has dismissed 3,168 debt-collection cases against state residents and ordered that any liens associated with those cases be released. The move, involving Worldwide Asset Purchasing cases, is a result of a settlement in a federal class-action suit. Attorneys for the plaintiffs alleged that the debt-buying firm wasn't licensed, sued for the wrong amounts, filed cases after the statute of limitations had expired, and included consumers' Social Security numbers in publicly available court filings, the state judiciary said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
Michael D. Eaton ran up a tab for 17 beers plus other drinks before he left a Gaithersburg tavern, according to court records. Forty-five minutes later, behind the wheel of his Range Rover, he slammed into the back of a Jeep Cherokee at a speed estimated as high as 98 mph. Ten-year-old Jazimen Warr had nestled on her sister's shoulder, the two children sleeping in the back of the family's Cherokee on the drive to a relative's home in Bowie....
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 19, 2014
Levi Watkins, the pioneering cardiac surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, remembers the date — January 15 — because it was the anniversary of the birth of Martin Luther King Jr., and because what happened that night still makes him ache. It was 1979, and Watkins, the first black chief resident in cardiac surgery at Hopkins, had just left his office after conferring with a senior medical student named Alan Trimakas. They had agreed on the subject of a research project — cardiac neoplasms, tumors of the heart or heart valves.
NEWS
July 2, 2014
Victims advocates are expressing dismay over a decision this week by Maryland's highest court that could lead to the removal of hundreds of names from a list of registered sex offenders in the state. The advocates say removing names from the registry could put women and children at greater risk by leaving families less able to identify potential predators in their midst. But critics of the list argue there's no evidence it has resulted in fewer sexual assaults or deterred offenders from committing such crimes.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
A lawsuit that accuses Creig Northrop Team, Long & Foster and several mortgage firms — including Long & Foster's Prosperity Mortgage Co. — of perpetrating mortgage fraud to ease home buying and selling could go before a jury, after the Maryland Court of Special Appeals reversed a lower court decision that found the statute of limitations had expired in the case. Creig Northrop Team sold more homes than any other real estate group in the state last year and was one of the top five in the country, according to a ranking by RealTrend.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Robert L. Karwacki, a retired Maryland Court of Appeals judge who was president of the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners during the troubled early 1970s, died of kidney failure Monday at his Chester home. The former Mount Vernon resident was 80. He was named head of the city's school board in 1970 and assisted in the appointment of Baltimore's first African-American schools superintendent. "Brown v. the Board was years earlier; Bob was a master in maintaining educational stability," said former Baltimore Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro III, who named him to the school post.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
A Baltimore man convicted in the 2003 shooting deaths of two men at an Essex party was sentenced to life plus 20 years in prison Wednesday, prosecutors said. Jaron Grade, 36, was first convicted by a jury in December 2004 and sentenced to life plus 20 years, but the Maryland Court of Appeals later overturned the conviction. The panel ordered a new trial because it found that a Baltimore County judge violated Grade's rights by replacing a juror with an alternate during his trial with no input from the defense.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
A nearly $1.7 million payment from Baltimore County to the police union to resolve a battle over retiree health care costs included about $228,000 in interest accrued while the county fought court rulings in the case. The county wrote a check last week to the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 to reimburse more than 400 retirees who the state's highest court determined were overcharged for health insurance premiums. The dispute began seven years ago, eventually reaching the Maryland Court of Appeals in 2012.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
With $50 million a year in county revenues on the line, the U.S. Supreme Court said Tuesday it would hear a challenge to a ruling by Maryland's highest court that some taxes on out-of-state income are collected in violation of the Constitution. A Howard County business owner and his wife challenged the tax laws, arguing that they were being taxed twice on some income. The Maryland Court of Appeals agreed in a ruling last year, saying that the state's power to levy taxes on income earned outside its borders is limited.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Maryland's highest court handed a victory to same-sex couples Friday in a ruling that the governor and other advocates hailed as an endorsement of administration policies recognizing gay marriages performed in other states. "To treat families differently under the law because they happen to be led by gay or lesbian couples is not right or just," Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement. "Today's decision is another step forward in our efforts to ensure that every child is protected equally under the law. " However, the ruling, in a case over whether Maryland courts could grant divorces to same-sex spouses, met with skepticism from groups fighting a recently passed state law legalizing gay nuptials.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
Maryland courts are accepting public comment through Sept. 21 on policies for the soon-to-be-installed electronic system that will allow the courts to receive, send and keep documents in computerized case files. Policy issues that have not been decided yet include those for access to electronic records and fees for remote access to the materials. Written comments should be sent to Sandra F. Haines, Esq., 2011-D Commerce Park Drive, Annapolis, Md., 21401. The Court of Appeals will meet Oct. 18 to consider the remarks.
FEATURES
Dan Rodricks | May 8, 2014
In the years since Baltimore Circuit Judge M. Brooke Murdock's famously controversial ruling helped energize the movement to overturn Maryland's ban against same-sex marriage, three gay men have invited her to officiate at their weddings. One was a lawyer and old friend. One was a fellow judge. The third was a man who used to walk his dog in Federal Hill at the same time of day Murdock did. Some time after her 2006 ruling that Maryland's marriage law was discriminatory, the dog-walker asked Murdock to preside at his wedding - once, he said, same-sex marriage became legal.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
Two years after a decision by the state's highest court mandating that criminal suspects be represented by counsel at every stage of their cases, including the initial bail hearing before a commissioner, we still have no sustainable plan to make that happen. Instead, lawmakers once again punted on the issue this year by approving a last-minute, $10 million fund to pay private attorneys to represent indigent defendants at their initial bail hearings — even though that amount may be grossly inadequate to cover the 160,000 such hearings held each year in Maryland.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.