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NEWS
April 8, 1998
Also in the section, dates listed for the University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Service's training for volunteer financial counselors were incorrect. The training will be on Fridays from April 24 through June 5, except for May 1. Information: 410-222-6756.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 4/08/98
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2009
Giant pussy willow, Japanese pussy willow: Salix chaenomeloides It's hard not to feel fond of a plant you can pet. The furry catkins on giant pussy willow grow so large they resemble rabbit's feet. Some even sport "toes." This fun small tree reaches 15 feet to 25 feet tall at a fast rate. Its narrow, dark-green leaves are a lighter tone underneath. Perfect for winter interest in the garden, its buds swell shiny red in late winter. To enjoy it indoors, cut branches as soon as the silky rose-gray catkins emerge.
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NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2008
I've had a lemon tree growing by my driveway in Southern Maryland for at least five years. It's 20 feet tall and bore fruit for the first time this summer. Obviously it can withstand snow, freezing temperatures and drought. The lemons are mostly large and delicious. Isn't this unusual in Maryland? Lemon trees are classified as tropical. They normally need to be placed indoors as protection against Maryland's winters. However, a couple of cultivars are hardy down to 17 degrees, namely, Meyer and Lisbon.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2008
I've had a lemon tree growing by my driveway in Southern Maryland for at least five years. It's 20 feet tall and bore fruit for the first time this summer. Obviously it can withstand snow, freezing temperatures and drought. The lemons are mostly large and delicious. Isn't this unusual in Maryland? Lemon trees are classified as tropical. They normally need to be placed indoors as protection against Maryland's winters. However, a couple of cultivars are hardy down to 17 degrees, namely, Meyer and Lisbon.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2008
The man who removed our tree stump said to put down lime and not plant grass seed until next year. Is that right? We want to plant now. Early fall is the best time to plant grass. However, you may want to wait. If the stump was alive, the fresh "green" sawdust and chips mixed in the soil can release compounds toxic to new grass. Aging will dissipate the compounds. Also, as sawdust decomposes, it uses nitrogen, robbing grass seedlings of the nitrogen they need. You could mix some nitrogen fertilizer into the soil or replace the top few inches of soil with other topsoil to help overcome these obstacles.
FEATURES
By ELLEN NIBALI and ELLEN NIBALI,MARYLAND COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE | October 20, 2007
Goldenrod `Fireworks'(Solidago rugosa `Fireworks') True to its name, `Fireworks' seems to explode sprays of bright-yellow flowers. This takes place over a long period in autumn. At 3 feet to 4 feet in height, the plant stays more compact and flowers more heavily than the wild species. Sometimes mistaken for ragweed and blamed for allergies, this native perennial is actually highly beneficial. It provides nectar for bees and migrating butterflies in fall. In winter, its seeds feed juncos, finches and other birds.
NEWS
July 9, 1991
The Maryland Cooperative Extension Service's program are open to allcitizens without regard to race, color, sex, handicap, religion, ageor national origin.They offer classes, workshops, seminars, and other programs to improve the quality of life, health and the environment. The service also supports research in a variety of areas, including computer-assisted nutrient management, the development of geographic information systems for resource management, pollution reductionthrough computer modeling, pesticide safety equipment, and computer control of water quality in aquaculture.
NEWS
September 5, 2004
Pasture walk to be held at Mare's Reach Farm The Maryland Cooperative Extension will hold a pasture walk from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday at Mare's Reach Farm in Mount Airy. Snacks will be available at 9:30 a.m. Participants will be given a walking tour of the farm, focusing on the challenges, activities and outcomes at Mare's Reach. Ben Turner and Tara Santmire set up their small horse operation on land that had slopes, erosion, wet soils and weeds. They will discuss how they handled those challenges and have adapted to keep five horses on four acres of their farm.
NEWS
December 23, 2001
USDA names head of service agency at its Maryland office The U.S. Department of Agriculture has named Steven A. Connelly Maryland state executive for the Farm Service Agency. Connelly has been involved in agriculture for the past 20 years, holding positions with the Maryland Department of Agriculture, Maryland Farm Bureau and USDA's Agricultural Research Center. He was most recently executive director at Maryland Agricultural Education Foundation Inc. A dairy farmer, Connelly holds a bachelor's degree in agricultural and resource economics.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2008
This volunteer plant in my shade bed grows low like a fern, but the leaves are coarser like a palm. Each leaflet has lovely waves like the ocean. Now it's forming seeds at the ends of the leaflets and, before it spreads, I guess I'd better find out what I've got. Pull it up and dispose of it in a sealed trash bag immediately, being careful to get all seeds. You've found wavy leaf basketgrass, an invasive plant that has recently hit the U.S. and was found first here in Maryland. Eradication efforts are under way, but it's crucial for homeowners to be alert for this damaging plant, which can quickly take over an entire forest floor, smothering and crowding out native plants.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2008
How is it best to preserve seeds, maybe for many years? Store them in a cool, dry location in a container with a tight-fitting lid. An ideal way to prepare seeds for long-term storage is to place seed packets in a jar, seal the jar tightly and place it in a refrigerator or freezer. To help absorb moisture, place a small, cloth bag filled with dry, powdered milk or silica gel in the bottom of the jar. On Oct. 19, my husband aerated and overseeded. If and when the new grass appears, will it be OK to vacuum the leaves or mulch them with a mower?
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2008
Why don't my chrysanthemums keep blooming through the whole fall season? Most years, I have to buy mums twice. Then they die! Aren't they supposed to be perennials? Yes, chrysanthemums are perennials, but to survive the winter they need time for their root systems to get established. Plant early in the fall and keep them moist by supplementing rainfall through autumn. Protect tender roots with evergreen boughs or an airy mulch if you cut the mums down after frost kills the tops. Remove any mulch early in spring.
NEWS
By Ishita Singh | September 27, 2008
The latest threat to Maryland native species is a unique-looking plant with leaves that look like they have been folded and then smoothed out. Wavyleaf Basketgrass, native to Southeast Asia, was first discovered in 1996 in Patapsco Valley State Park. Last year, researchers found it in Little Paint Branch Park in Prince George's County. The plant's seeds spread in the fall by sticking to animals, pants, boots and bikes. Once the seed is planted, Wavyleaf Basketgrass out-competes native plant life.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2008
The man who removed our tree stump said to put down lime and not plant grass seed until next year. Is that right? We want to plant now. Early fall is the best time to plant grass. However, you may want to wait. If the stump was alive, the fresh "green" sawdust and chips mixed in the soil can release compounds toxic to new grass. Aging will dissipate the compounds. Also, as sawdust decomposes, it uses nitrogen, robbing grass seedlings of the nitrogen they need. You could mix some nitrogen fertilizer into the soil or replace the top few inches of soil with other topsoil to help overcome these obstacles.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2008
This volunteer plant in my shade bed grows low like a fern, but the leaves are coarser like a palm. Each leaflet has lovely waves like the ocean. Now it's forming seeds at the ends of the leaflets and, before it spreads, I guess I'd better find out what I've got. Pull it up and dispose of it in a sealed trash bag immediately, being careful to get all seeds. You've found wavy leaf basketgrass, an invasive plant that has recently hit the U.S. and was found first here in Maryland. Eradication efforts are under way, but it's crucial for homeowners to be alert for this damaging plant, which can quickly take over an entire forest floor, smothering and crowding out native plants.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | September 7, 2008
Winemaking is still a tiny part of Maryland agriculture, but in recent years, it has been growing faster than your front lawn during the rainy season. Four years ago, there were 12 licensed wineries in the state. That number nearly doubled in 2006 and just about tripled this year. At present, there are 34 wineries in the state, according the Maryland Wineries Association. They are scattered throughout the state from the Eastern Shore to Western Maryland. The industry is showing no signs of slowing down any time soon.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2008
I was hoping my lawn would recover from last summer's drought, but it is almost all weeds. Is there anything I can do now to get ready to plant grass seed next spring? Don't wait to seed. Early fall is the best time to seed your lawn. Fall seeding gives your new lawn the huge advantage of going through three relatively moist seasons - fall, winter, spring - before it must face a summer. By then, it will have a good root system established and will be able to tolerate drought and high temperatures much better.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | June 15, 2008
Winemaking is still a tiny part of Maryland agricultural industry, but with some assistance from state government, it is growing at a healthy rate. In 2004, there were only 12 licensed wineries in the state. That number jumped to 22 in 2006 and to 31 this year, according to the Maryland Wine Industries Association. State officials think there is room for even more. The Governor's Advisory Commission on Maryland Wine and Grape is offering $147,000 in grants this year to be used for a variety of projects to put more made-in-Maryland wine in the glasses of consumers.
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