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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2012
The mood was celebratory Tuesday night at Arcos Restaurant in Fells Point, where the Dreamers - students brought to the United States illegally as children, who now want to pursue higher education here - won their battle for in-state tuition breaks at the state's public colleges and universities. "This means so much to me, my parents and my family - who are the other dreamers," Nathaly Uribe, a senior at Glen Burnie High School who was 2 when her parents brought her from Chile, said while keeping an eye on election results at the Mexican restaurant on South Broadway.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 8, 2014
I realize it's impolite to stand up in the 21st century and declare something that was established in Colonial Maryland - say, the election of sheriffs in every county and Baltimore City - to be archaic, inefficient and unnecessary. But with all due respect to the old snuff-sniffers in powdered wigs who mandated it, I can no longer remain seated. Voting for sheriffs is as silly as silk pants. So is voting for registers of wills. Ditto for orphans' court judges, clerks of the court, and even state's attorneys.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 25, 1991
If it were not in the Maryland Constitution that Steny must be given a district both Democratic and white, legislators would have no trouble drawing sensible and honest congressional districts.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
The conservative group Judicial Watch has asked the Court of Special Appeals to overturn last November's referendum on a new congressional redistricting map for Maryland, contending the wording of the ballot question was misleading. Backed by Del. Neil Parrott's MDPetitions.com, Judicial Watch filed an appeal of a Circuit Court decision last year upholding the wording. The plaintiffs asked the appeals court to require a new election using different ballot language. The General Assembly approved the new map drawn up by Gov. Martin O'Malley and Democratic legislative leaders in a special session in 2011.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | January 10, 2009
Mayor Sheila Dixon has pledged to fight the charges of theft and perjury she faces and said she will continue to serve in office. If she is not convicted, it would be very difficult, if not impossible, to remove her from office, a review of the City Charter, state constitution and legal articles shows. There is no method for expelling a sitting mayor or members of the City Council in the City Charter, though the Maryland Constitution does have a provision that disqualifies from office any elected official who has been convicted of a crime.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer Staff writer John W. Frece contributed to this article | November 5, 1992
An advocacy group for the poor has sued Gov. William Donald Schaefer, charging that he violated the Maryland Constitution when he ordered cuts in welfare and medical-assistance programs.The lawsuit, filed this week in behalf of six Baltimore residents, challenges a 1939 statute that gives the governor authority to reduce the state budget when a shortfall is projected. Theplaintiffs' welfare and public-assistance payments were reduced as of Sunday.The suit claims that the statute, which has never faced a legal test, essentially gives the governor a line-item veto over the budget.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2003
The General Assembly session ended this week without Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. naming a new environmental secretary, an apparent violation of the Maryland Constitution. In March, the Senate rejected the nomination of Lynn Y. Buhl, Ehrlich's choice to run the Maryland Department of the Environment, creating a vacancy at the head of the agency. It was the first time that the legislature has rejected a governor's pick, a high-profile setback to the new Republican administration. Ehrlich says he still wants Buhl -- a former Chrysler Corp.
NEWS
By Lesa Jansen and Lesa Jansen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2002
The Constitution Party, formerly the U.S. Taxpayers Party and a group that wants to abolish the Internal Revenue Service, is holding information meetings in Carroll County to expand its membership, part of a statewide effort to swell the party's ranks. Westminster real estate agent Gary Hagerick is Carroll chairman for the party, which follows a strict interpretation of the Constitution. "I think there's been a shift in emphasis in the last year or so to develop the party at the local level as opposed to the national," he said.
NEWS
By J.H. Snider | January 18, 2012
Many laws aren't enforced, including requirements that you pay payroll tax for baby sitters and clean your sidewalk after a snowstorm. But enforcing the Maryland Constitution, especially in regard to electoral rules, should not be a matter of discretion. On Nov. 2, 2010, a statewide ballot referendum asked voters whether they wanted to convene a state constitutional convention (con-con). Under Maryland's constitution, this referendum is automatically placed on the ballot every 20 years.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | December 14, 2007
Republican legislative leaders filed suit yesterday to invalidate all of the tax, gambling and spending reduction bills approved in last month's special session of the General Assembly. They argue that the Senate violated the state constitution by adjourning for six days without a vote of approval from the House of Delegates. A clause in the Maryland Constitution says that: "Neither House shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, at any one time, nor adjourn to any other place, than that in which the House shall be sitting, without the concurrent vote of two-thirds of the members present."
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
Attorneys challenging a death sentence before the state's highest court last week dug deeply into online historical documents to divine the intention behind what they think is a never-before-interpreted part of the state's constitution. Public defender Brian Saccenti and a team of lawyers rested their argument in part on a once-famous 18th-century book by a young Italian nobleman named Cesare Beccaria, who suggested that capital punishment should be reserved for treasonous criminals.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
The Maryland Court of Appeals heard a new argument against the death penalty Thursday, when attorneys for a man convicted of a 1997 murder argued that the state's constitution only allows capital punishment in cases of treason. Public defender Brian Saccenti argued that a clause in the Maryland Declaration of Rights referring to "sanguinary laws" limits the death penalty to crimes that threaten the stability of the state government. "We have ways to fairly incapacitate people that we lacked in 1776," Saccenti told the judges, arguing that the state can be protected without executions.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2012
The mood was celebratory Tuesday night at Arcos Restaurant in Fells Point, where the Dreamers - students brought to the United States illegally as children, who now want to pursue higher education here - won their battle for in-state tuition breaks at the state's public colleges and universities. "This means so much to me, my parents and my family - who are the other dreamers," Nathaly Uribe, a senior at Glen Burnie High School who was 2 when her parents brought her from Chile, said while keeping an eye on election results at the Mexican restaurant on South Broadway.
MOBILE
November 5, 2012
Maryland voters will decide the outcome of seven ballot questions in November. Question 1 - All Maryland voters will decide whether the judges in Prince George's County who oversee estate and will disputes must be admitted to the Maryland Bar. Baltimore City and Montgomery and Harford counties currently require this. Supporters say the measure will professionalize the so-called “Orphan's Court” which oversees estate disputes. Opponents are concerned that the change will lead to a statewide requirement that Orphan's Court judges be attorneys, which they believe is unnecessary.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
By any standard measure, Neil Parrott's place in Maryland politics ought to be toward the very bottom. He's a freshman Republican delegate in a very blue state, without pedigree or government connections. Yet through dogged organizing and clever use of technology, this tea party leader from Hagerstown has turned a little-used provision of the Maryland Constitution into a tool capable of overturning chunks of the ruling Democrats' legislative agenda. Parrott, a University of Maryland-trained traffic engineer, developed a website that makes it much easier to collect the 56,000 valid signatures needed to petition a law to referendum in Maryland.
NEWS
June 15, 2012
This week, Del. Tiffany Alston ofPrince George's Countywas convicted of stealing $800 from the General Assembly to pay an aide in her private law firm. The offense is a misdemeanor, but it is directly related to her duties in office - in fact, she was also convicted of official misconduct - and as such falls under a provision of the Maryland constitution that triggers automatic suspension from the General Assembly. Nonetheless, Ms. Alston stands to be a pivotal figure in the legislature next month if Gov.Martin O'Malleycalls a special session to consider the expansion of gambling.
NEWS
by a Sun reporter | December 12, 2006
The Maryland Constitution makes it clear that elections must be held on a single day in November, and that voters must cast their choices in home election districts, the state's highest court said in a written decision released yesterday elaborating on its August ruling striking down multiple-day early voting. Still, the debate over the practice could continue during the 90-day General Assembly session that begins next month, one lawmaker involved in the issue said. The General Assembly passed early-voting legislation in 2005 and refined it this year, authorizing selected polling places in each county to open five days before Election Day. Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. vetoed both bills, arguing in part that they opened the state's election system to fraud, and that they were pushed through by Democrats who were trying to gain an upper hand in this year's election.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
Del. Maggie L. McIntosh said yesterday that she and other lawmakers would work with activists and community groups to ensure that a charter amendment to shrink the size of the City Council would be on Baltimore's ballot in November. While state lawmakers could force the issue in Annapolis with a bill to amend the Maryland Constitution, McIntosh said that she and her colleagues are opting for an easier tack this year. "There are a number of organizations working on a referendum," said McIntosh, a Baltimore Democrat who is majority leader of the House of Delegates.
NEWS
March 9, 2012
Kudos to Judge Benson E. Legg for overturning Maryland's draconian and unconstitutional gun-carry laws. Statistics are very clear - granting carry permits to law-abiding, well-trained citizens does not increase gun violence. In fact, when the good are armed, the bad are hesitant. When I lived in Pennsylvania, I had a weapons permit, carried the gun often and never once fired it anywhere except the shooting range. But I was prepared to protect myself and my family, if necessary. Our neighbors in Pennsylvania and Virginia, both demographically very similar to suburban Maryland, rank lower in gun deaths per 100,000 than our lovely state.
NEWS
By J.H. Snider | January 18, 2012
Many laws aren't enforced, including requirements that you pay payroll tax for baby sitters and clean your sidewalk after a snowstorm. But enforcing the Maryland Constitution, especially in regard to electoral rules, should not be a matter of discretion. On Nov. 2, 2010, a statewide ballot referendum asked voters whether they wanted to convene a state constitutional convention (con-con). Under Maryland's constitution, this referendum is automatically placed on the ballot every 20 years.
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