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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, Jamie Smith Hopkins and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2011
As Molotov cocktails, rocks and gunshots filled the streets of Cairo last week, executives at ARINC Inc. in Annapolis fixed on their employees' safety and getting them out of Egypt. The company, which outfitted Cairo's international terminal with electronics systems and maintains U.S. Air Force jets there, decided Thursday after days of anti-government protests and clashes to pull employees, contractors and their families out. It was a harrowing time — there and here. "This is what we've been living and breathing 24/7," said Alice Lao, ARINC'S director of international human resources.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The country's top foreign trade official told a gathering at a Baltimore County electronics components and design company Friday about gains in U.S. manufacturing jobs, and agreements being negotiated that would open two-thirds of the globe to free trade. U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman's appearance at Zentech Manufacturing Inc. in Woodlawn was part of Maryland's celebration of National Manufacturing Day, first organized by several industry groups in 2012. Across Maryland, state and local officials and business leaders conducted factory tours and gave speeches, all to highlight the significance and promise of manufacturing jobs in Maryland, which made up about 3.5 percent of total state employment in August.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
Organic products and those without preservatives and harsh processing remain big business in the United States — with $81 billion in sales last year — despite a tough economy. Sales in stores, online and in practitioners' offices were up 7 percent from the year before, according to the trade publication Natural Food Merchandiser, which conducts a survey every year. The public consumed items that included foods and herbal supplements, health and beauty items, and pet supplies. During the next few days, about 25,000 buyers from groceries, drugstores and big-box retailers, as well as distributors and food service operators at hospitals and colleges, will scour the aisles at the Natural Products Expo East, the largest show of its kind on the East Coast, to find the Next Big Things to put on store shelves.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Northrop Grumman broke ground Monday on a 25,00-square-foot facility specializing in cargo bound for space, the latest expansion to Maryland's slowly growing space industry. The $20 million center near Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will be used to create and test space payloads and will feature a three-story, 6,000-square-foot clean room, a climate-controlled, air-locked facility where sensitive equipment can be made free of contaminants. That clean room will be the largest on the company's 129-acre campus in Anne Arundel County.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1995
A story in Wednesday's Business section on Maryland companies in the Fortune 500 omitted Geico Corp. of Chevy Chase, which ranked 418th among U.S. companies in 1994 sales. The insurance company uses a Washington mailing address, but its headquarters are in Maryland.The Sun regrets the error.Seven Maryland companies appear on the new Fortune 500 list released yesterday, but some familiar manufacturing names are gone as the magazine merged its lists of top industrial and service companies to reflect the U.S. economy's "convergence."
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
Maryland companies are finding it ever harder to find qualified workers, and that is affecting the companies' ability to do business in the state, according to a work survey released yesterday.Forty-five percent of the responding companies said the shortage affected their business, up from 38 percent in 1997, the last time the Maryland Workforce Needs survey was conducted.The lack of enough qualified workers led to lower productivity, not meeting deadlines and lower quality of business products and services, among other issues, the companies said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
The campaign that won last month's referendum on expanded gambling spent almost $48 million, its share of the most expensive political fight in Maryland's history. But it but didn't provide much of a direct cash infusion to the state's economy. "For Maryland Jobs and School – Vote Yes on 7," the ballot committee backed by pro-expansion casino companies led by MGM Resorts International, spent only 4 percent of that money on companies, nonprofits and individuals with Maryland addresses, according to its post-election report to the State Board of Elections.
NEWS
April 28, 1995
A story in Wednesday's Business section on Maryland companies in the Fortune 500 omitted Geico Corp. of Chevy Chase, which ranked 418th among U.S. companies in 1994 sales. The insurance company uses a Washington mailing address, but its headquarters are in Maryland.The Sun regrets the error.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
The state of Maryland is trying to entice the former Yugoslavian republic of Slovenia to do business here by offering it loan guarantees to buy Maryland products or use state services.Although the U.S. government has yet to extend diplomatic relations to Slovenia, Gov. William Donald Schaefer and members of his Cabinet have decided to extend their own recognition. The state has agreed to guarantee up to $1 million for each transaction between that country and Maryland, officials said.Such transactions include buying goods from Maryland companies, employing state brokers for purchases or shipping through the port of Baltimore or Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening renewed ties with Maryland's Chinese "sister state," Anhui Province, by meeting with provincial delegates and signing an agreement of "economic opportunity."The pact is more a recognition of the two states' 15-year relationship than an imposition of contractual duties, although officials have agreed on some international management training.But links to Anhui have yielded deals for Maryland companies over the years, and the hope is that they will continue.Usually, "sister state agreements are very good on the cultural and educational level," said James Hughes, director of international trade for the state's Economic Development Department.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Helping manufacturers in Maryland, where the sector has changed - and shrunk - dramatically in the last generation, takes a certain type of person. Like Brian Sweeney, an engineer and attorney who grew up in a factory. Sweeney is executive director of the Maryland Manufacturing Extension Partnership. The Columbia nonprofit works with small and medium-sized makers of goods in the state to identify problems and opportunities and is among the groups that launched a Make it in Maryland campaign last week.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Nearly a month after Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 vanished, a team of Maryland engineers detected the pings from a flight data recorder that narrowed the search area to a more manageable yet still vast swath of the Indian Ocean. Working from an Australian warship involved in the search, a crew of nine from Phoenix International in Prince George's County deployed a U.S. Navy listening device to the depths of the ocean in the hunt for a signal from the doomed jetliner's black box. Tapped by the Navy to assist Malaysian, Chinese and Australian officials in the search, the team and their equipment had flown from an office and warehouse in Largo nearly two weeks earlier.
HEALTH
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
After buying Fractured Prune Doughnuts in January, Dan Brinton switched to an oil without trans fats to fry the chain's hand-dipped glazed doughnuts. "It's a little more expensive, but it's certainly worth it as far as I'm concerned," said Brinton, CEO of the growing Ocean City -based chain, on Thursday. Earlier in the day, the Food and Drug Administration moved to virtually eliminate trans fat, an artificially created artery-clogging substance, from Americans' diets. The move follows a massive effort by food makers and restaurant chains to remove the substance over the past decade, as consumers become more educated about risks and vote for healthier alternatives with their wallets.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
HAGERSTOWN — Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler brought his all-but-official campaign for governor to Western Maryland on Friday, pledging to help rebuild the state's manufacturing base by giving Maryland companies preference in securing government contracts. Gansler, speaking at a United Auto Workers union hall near Hagerstown's Mack Truck/Volvo plant, laid out a seven-point plan to increase the manufacturing sector, which he said now ranks 43rd in the nation. The most significant of those steps would be a reversal of Maryland's decades-old policy of letting in-state and out-of-state companies compete on an equal basis for billions of dollars annually in state contracts.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
When Nik Wallenda attempts to traverse the Grand Canyon some 1,500 feet above the Little Colorado River on Sunday, those watching on television will benefit from the technical expertise of a Maryland-based company that will outfit the 34-year-old self-described "King of the Wire" for his latest midair adventure. Peter Larsson co-founded Broadcast Sports Inc. four years after Wallenda was born and moved from his native Australia, where he and partner John Porter worked for a television station, to Connecticut.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Connecticut will lose its first gun manufacturer in the wake of its strict new gun law, and the South Carolina economic development officials who lured them to the Palmetto state may woo disaffected Maryland gun companies next. "We'll be looking at pretty much all of the northeast," said Brad Lofton, president and chief executive officer of the Myrtle Beach Regional Economic Development Corporation. As for Maryland's companies - at least two have threatened to leave - Lofton said, "We may be calling on them.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1998
Ten Maryland companies are included in Black Enterprise magazine's 100 biggest black-owned businesses in 1997.Pulsar Data Systems Inc. of Lanham ranked No. 9 with 1997 revenue of $151 million.Other Maryland companies in the top 50 were Baltimore-based Stop Shop Save Food Markets, No. 22 with sales of $86.5 million; Baltimore-based La-Van Hawkins Urban City Foods, Burger King, No. 24 at $86.4 million; Forestville-based Pepsi-Cola of Washington, D.C. LP, No. 32 at $61 million; Baltimore-based Super Pride Markets, No. 47 at $42.5 million; and Lanham-based Washington Cable Supply Inc., No. 48 at $42 million.
BUSINESS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Maryland's largest gun manufacturer has decided not to leave the state just yet. Beretta USA threatened to abandon its home on the Potomac if Maryland passed a strict new gun-control law, but after the law was signed the company announced that its operations would remain in Prince George's County for now. However, Beretta added, it would look elsewhere for future expansions. Beretta and another Maryland gun maker have taken a wait-and-see approach to leaving the state, balancing the risk of a customer backlash against the cost and difficulty of a possible move, while keeping up with unprecedented demand for guns of all kinds.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
It is with a heavy heart that after living here for 40 years, my husband and I must bid Maryland farewell. We can no longer afford to support fiscal and social programs with which we do not agree. We moved here in 1973, bought a home we could afford, sent our children to Maryland public schools, worked for Maryland companies, paid our share of property and income taxes, and lived within our means. And now that we have retired, the state of Maryland feels it is entitled to increase the tax burden on our hard-earned retirement income.
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