Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaryland Commission
IN THE NEWS

Maryland Commission

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1996
Maryland has become the ninth state to make testing for the AIDS virus mandatory for professional fighters and kick-boxers licensed by the state.The Maryland State Athletic Commission, headed by chairman D. Chester O'Sullivan, voted unanimously Thursday night to require annual blood tests for AIDS and highly contagious Hepatitis B no more than 30 days before a first-time licensee or a boxer seeking a license renewal will be allowed to fight within the...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 1, 2014
The lack of coherent rules for access to medical marijuana in Maryland is beyond absurd ( "Pot as medicine," Aug. 27). Medical marijuana has already been successfully implemented in many states across the country. Is Maryland so different that we can't adopt the same policies in use by other states? While there have been abuses of the system, they are relatively rare and non-threatening. Extending the logic applied by the Maryland commission on medical marijuana, we should ban swimming pools - responsible for hundreds of injuries and deaths every year - reduce the highway speed limit to 25 mph and make countless other changes to state law. Obviously, that's not the answer.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Risselle "Rikki" Fleisher, a former general counsel to the Maryland Commission on Human Relations who was a legal advocate in civil rights cases, died Tuesday of breast cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. The Bethany Beach, Del., resident was 77. "She wanted to right any wrong," said former Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. "She was a caring person who grew up at a time when things were happening that never should have. She worked to change that. " Born Risselle Rosenthal in Baltimore and raised on Mohawk Avenue, she was a 1953 graduate of Forest Park High School, where she was a three-letter athlete, her yearbook's features editor and homeroom class president.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
In a reversal of state healthcare policy, transgender state employees in Maryland can now access gender reassignment surgery, hormone therapy and other transition-related care under their state-provided health insurance plans. The change quietly went into effect at the start of this month as the result of legal negotiations in a discrimination case brought against the state by Sailor Holobaugh, a 31-year-old clinical research assistant in neurology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | December 23, 1992
In yesterday's editions of The Sun, Ronnie Smuck wa identified incorrectly as a co-promoter of an unsanctioned boxing show that had been scheduled at Tiffany East in June. John DiRossi was the sole director of the event, which was enjoined by the Maryland State Athletic Commission. Mr. DiRossi, who said the show would benefit the United Society of the Handicapped, raised $500 for Easter Seals through the advance sale of tickets for the non-sanctioned card.The Sun regrets the errors.Baltimore welterweight Eddie Van Kirk has been suspendefor a year by the Maryland State Athletic Commission.
NEWS
July 6, 2002
Burdette C. "Bud" Terry, former executive director of the Maryland Commission on Physical Fitness and owner of Mr. Bud's Fit by Five Inc., died of pancreatitis June 29 at St. Agnes HealthCare. He was 67 and lived in Arbutus. Mr. Terry was born in Celeron, N.Y., and raised in Erie and Warren, Pa. He earned a bachelor's degree in health education from Slippery Rock State Teachers College in 1956. From 1957 to 1967, he worked for the YMCA in Pennsylvania. He later was associate physical director at the YMCA in Washington until being named executive director of the Maryland Commission on Physical Fitness in 1968.
NEWS
November 8, 1993
The Maryland Public Service Commission's recent decision to charge customers for a 1989 breakdown of Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.'s Crane power plant suggests that it is more understanding of utilities' excuses than of consumer interests.The money involved in this case is small, less than $1 for each customer. The implications of the decision, however, could mean significant charges for consumers in future PSC verdicts.The commission, and its hearing examiner, found BG&E "management action" was responsible for the three-month outage of the Crane generator.
NEWS
April 17, 1998
A former state public affairs official and the director of a program development center for the National Council of Negro Women have been named to head the Maryland Commission on African-American History and Culture.Carroll H. Hynson Jr. of Arnold, retired public affairs director for the Maryland State Lottery and formerly with the State Aviation Administration and the old Provident Hospital, was chosen as chairman.Mitchellville resident Lucenia W. Dunn, national director of the Bethune Program Development Center of the women's council, will be vice chairwoman of the commission.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
The lack of coherent rules for access to medical marijuana in Maryland is beyond absurd ( "Pot as medicine," Aug. 27). Medical marijuana has already been successfully implemented in many states across the country. Is Maryland so different that we can't adopt the same policies in use by other states? While there have been abuses of the system, they are relatively rare and non-threatening. Extending the logic applied by the Maryland commission on medical marijuana, we should ban swimming pools - responsible for hundreds of injuries and deaths every year - reduce the highway speed limit to 25 mph and make countless other changes to state law. Obviously, that's not the answer.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Staff Writer | December 5, 1993
One student, who is gay, dropped out of school because of sexual harassment. Another had condoms taped to her locker.Both shared their stories with a group of educators, state officials, students and parents recently in Bel Air in an effort to increase awareness of sexual harassment in Maryland schools.In conjunction with the American Association of University Women, organizers from three agencies -- the Maryland Department of Education, the Maryland Commission on Human Relations and the Maryland Commission for Women -- said they were responding to surveys and national and statewide incidents of sexual harassment.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
Thomas D. Washburne Sr., a partner in the Baltimore law firm of Ober/Kaler whose specialty was estate planning, died Tuesday of an unknown neurological disorder at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 86. The son of Hempstead Washburne, a lawyer, and Mary Dennehy Washburne, a homemaker, Thomas Dennehy Washburne was born and raised in Lake Forest, Ill. After graduating in 1945 from the Taft School in Watertown, Conn., he earned a bachelor's degree in 1949 from Princeton University. In 1952, he earned his law degree from the University of Virginia and came to Baltimore to clerk for Judge William C. Coleman, chief judge of the U.S. District Court.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
Mike Hopkins, the executive director of the Maryland Racing Commission, was injured in a motorcycle accident Wednesday night in Harford County. Hopkins was flown to the University of Maryland's Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where he has undergone two surgeries. Hopkins said Friday he suffered a broken clavicle, five broken ribs and a broken pelvis. "I'm hanging in there," Hopkins said. He said he would remain hospitalized for another two to three days. According to the Maryland State Police, Hopkins was riding a 2013 Harley Davidson north on Route 1, just past the intersection with Route 136, when a 2011 Chevy Cruz pulled out of the parking lot of Harford Tire and failed to yield.
NEWS
May 29, 2013
100 Years Ago Track tunnel From a Times front page article: "ELKRIDGE GRADE CROSSING CASE ... "The long-drawn-out controversy about the completion of the Baltimore Washington Boulevard through the village of Elkridge seems to be near a settlement as a result of a hearing held before the Public service commission last Monday, and it is claimed by some that this bothersome section will probably be completed by the end of the summer....
NEWS
March 12, 2013
Last April, The New York Times reported on a startling spike in the deaths of horses running at the Aqueduct Racetrack in Queens. The investigation found widespread use of drugs to prop up horses that were worn out, broken down or otherwise unfit for the contests in which they were entered, contributing to a 100 percent increase in the horse fatality rate in the first few months of the year. Why were horse owners suddenly taking those kinds of risks? The answer was simple: money. A slot machine gambling parlor opened at Aqueduct in late 2011, subsidizing a massive increase in the purses paid to winning horses and creating financial incentives for owners to take advantage of a lax regulatory structure.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 18, 2012
Minutes before Tuesday's meeting of the Maryland Racing Commission, officials representing tracks and horsemen from throughout the state staked out space in a darkened lounge at Laurel Park. They shuffled through paperwork, then wrote quickly on the last page of the document and passed it to the next person in line. This was not a discreet ceremonial signing of the 10-year racing deal meant to bring stability to an industry that has repeatedly relied on government help. That deal, announced Friday, was already in place and was the subject of resounding praise.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Maryland's casinos will be allowed to open 24 hours a day under new regulations approved Thursday by the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Commission that also relaxed limits on ATMs and lending to gamblers in the facilities. With the advent of full-scale casino gambling in Maryland after voters approved table games in the November election, the commission is updating the regulatory regime and relaxing some restrictions. The changes also added new rules, including some governing junkets that casinos provide to high-rolling gamblers.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2001
Westminster resident Naomi Benzil, a member of the Maryland Commission for Women since the fall, is eager to increase participation in the advocacy group in Carroll County and elsewhere. "Lots of people say why have a commission for women," said Benzil, who was appointed by Gov. Parris N. Glendening to a four-year term. "For those who wonder, I share this philosophy: when the concerns for women are positively addressed, the result is that family life and the economic wellbeing of entire community benefit."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2004
Anne Carey Boucher, former chairwoman of the Maryland Commission on the Status of Women and member of Morgan State University's board of regents, died in her sleep of undetermined causes Friday at her Towson home. She was 66 and had lived for many years in Cockeysville. She and her husband, Greater Baltimore Committee Director William Boucher III, were recalled yesterday as an "inseparable civic team" who promoted the rebirth of downtown Baltimore. Mr. Boucher, who died in 1995, headed the civic group for 26 years.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Maryland said today that it has formed a commission that, among other tasks, will recommend which of seven athletic teams - eliminated in budget cuts last June 30 - may be reinstated. The commission will be headed by Barry Gossett, a regent and top donor, and Linda Clement, vice president for student affairs. In 2011, Gossett and Clement were co-chairs of the commission that recommended that eight of the university's 27 teams be discontinued because of severe, longstanding budget issues.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | November 30, 2012
The Maryland Racing Commission set a Nov. 30 deadline for the completion of what could be an unprecedented 10-year deal to outline the future of horse racing in the state . It will come and go without signatures on the contract. "I wouldn't read anything negative into that," said Alan Foreman, lawyer for the state's horsemen. There's no impasse, he said, on any significant part of the agreement. Mike Hopkins, executive director of the racing commission, said he has spoken to members of the board, including chairman Bruce Quade, and they are satisfied with the progress made so far. They expect a deal to be finalized before their final meeting of the year on Dec. 18. Tom Chuckas of the Maryland Jockey Club, owner of Laurel and Pimlico, struck the most measured tone saying "when it is appropriate, we will make an announcement.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.