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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
COLLEGE PARK - College basketball coaches readily admit that few of their philosophies and strategies are original. In the old days, coaches would attend clinics to pick up ideas. In an age of satellite dishes and the Internet, just plain thievery is the most sincere form of flattery. "I always stole stuff off teams that won a national championship," Maryland coach Gary Williams said recently. Having coached the Terrapins to their first NCAA championship last season, Williams was not surprised to get more requests than ever for diagrams and tapes of an offense he has run his entire college coaching career.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | November 27, 1993
LANDOVER -- Kurtis Shultz officially began his junior season at the University of Maryland by falling flat on his face -- and that was before he entered yesterday's game against Georgetown at USAir Arena."
SPORTS
By Don Markus | February 19, 1991
There are two questions to be answered by the University of Maryland basketball team this season: Will the Terrapins finish at .500 or better, and will Walt Williams play again this season?Maryland (13-11) could take a significant step toward accomplishing the first when it plays Virginia Tech (10-13) in Blacksburg, Va., tonight. A victory would ensure a .500 season for the Terps, who have three Atlantic Coast Conference games remaining.Williams doesn't appear ready to play his first game since suffering a fractured left fibula Jan. 12 against Duke.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | February 11, 1991
DURHAM, N.C. -- The Maryland Terrapins may have gotten a big nugget of good news from Saturday's crushing 101-81 loss to Duke: Their star might be coming back early.Junior guard Walt Williams said he might be ready to play as early as Wednesday night's home game against Georgia Tech, as his progress from the broken right fibula he suffered in the Duke meeting last month has been faster than expected."I could [play this week]," said Williams. "It all depends on how I feel. I'm making progress."
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1990
What does a team that has played four games in eight days need?The obvious answer is a day off and Maryland coach Gary Williams gave his mentally and physically weary Terrapins just that yesterday on the other side of Monday's 100-85 loss to Boston College and Saturday's 90-85 setback at West Virginia."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Evening Sun Staff | January 8, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- Cole Field House has been quiet for nearly a month. Tonight, it comes back to life, and the Maryland basketball team hopes it can, too.The Terrapins return home after three games -- all losses -- on the road. But along with the first sellout crowd of the 1991-92 season, No. 1 Duke will be waiting for them."Playing Duke is obviously a tremendous challenge," Maryland coach Gary Williams said yesterday. "At the same time, you know your players will be ready to play."After a pair of discouraging defeats at the Fiesta Bowl Classic, Maryland (7-4, 0-1 in the ACC)
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | February 25, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- Maryland coach Gary Williams remembers the moment well.The Terps were trailing Wake Forest by eight Saturday and he had just finished his halftime chat with the team.As the Terps were heading out of the dressing room at Cole Field House, a certain 6-foot-8 junior point guard named Walt Williams tapped his coach on the shoulder and said that after sitting out five weeks and 11 games with a broken bone in his left leg, it was time.Gary Williams was more than amenable to the suggestion.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 11, 1990
COLLEGE PARK -- When the University of Maryland basketball team last left the court at Cole Field House after a game, the Terrapins were undefeated and seemingly undaunted at the prospect of a three-game road trip.Twelve days later, a different Maryland team returns.When the Terps take the floor for a 7:30 p.m. game tonight against the University of California-Irvine, they will be trying to erase the memories of a losing streak that stretched from Morgantown, W.Va., to Jacksonville, Fla., with a pitiful stop in Richmond, Va."
SPORTS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | April 2, 2002
Even when the game was close, it wasn't the kind of tight matchup that CBS had hoped for. Both Maryland and Indiana played stilted, awkward ball throughout the NCAA men's championship game. Elements that announcers Jim Nantz and Billy Packer deemed key factors turned out to be irrelevant, as indifferent passes and wayward shooting sapped much of the energy from what was supposed to be college basketball's finest showcase. "This game is one of the poorest played championship games by either team that I've seen in a long time," Packer said, early in the second half, saving much of his derisive comments for Terrapins guard Steve Blake.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 29, 1990
COLLEGE PARK -- Garfield Smith came to the University of Maryland from Coffeyville (Kan.) Junior College before this season with a reputation for offense. That assessment, and Smith's performance, proved nearly perfect last night.Smith, a 6-foot-6 junior forward, kept the Terrapins in their game against Southern Cal when guards Walt Williams and Matt Roe were struggling to find their shots. Smith continued to hit his, and it resulted in a 72-59 victory before 10,110 at Cole Field House.Williams led the Terps with his second-straight 20-point game, including 16 in the second half, but Smith's offense and Vince Broadnax's defense proved to be the difference for Maryland (2-0)
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