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NEWS
August 22, 1995
Gone are the Monday Club, the Baltimore Club, the Columbus Club, the Gramercy Club and even the Handsome Young Men's Club. All were on the rollicking itinerary of Mayor Ferdinand Latrobe on New Year's Day, 1892, as he and other city notables made the rounds. The first stop on his all-day celebration, which he assured his wife was abstemious except for one whiskey punch, was at the white marble palace the Maryland Club had just opened at Charles and Eager Streets.Today the Maryland Club still stands at the same location, a bulwark of the whole Mount Vernon area.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Baltimore's private dining clubs, longtime bastions of business networking and deal-making, are loosening up in an effort to attract a younger generation to keep their doors open. Dress codes are easing and lower dues are offered for young members at the Engineers Club of Baltimore in Mount Vernon and the Center Club downtown on the 16th floor of the Transamerica tower. Both have invested millions of dollars over the last five years to revamp aging facilities and maintain the appeal of exclusivity to attract those with money to spend.
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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1995
Roused by a midnight phone call, Walter Schamu scrambled yesterday morning to Charles and Eager streets and was met by a sickening sight: The century-old marble-and-hardwood Maryland Club was ablaze. Firefighters summoned by seven alarms were struggling to douse the climbing flames."It's just an awful, gut-wrenching, hopeless and helpless feeling to see such a fine and incredible historical landmark under siege as it was," said Mr. Schamu, an architect and member of the governing board of the private men's club.
SPORTS
Aaron Dodson and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
On Monday, the Maryland Jockey Club unveiled the logo for next year's Preakness, the 140th running of the middle jewel of horse racing's Triple Crown. For the 16th straight year, the Leffler Agency designed the logo, according to a news release. "Creating the 140th Preakness logo was its usual challenge in terms of building flexibility for everything from embroidered merchandise and painting on grass to use on HD television," Leffler Agency chief executive officer Heather Connellee said in the release.
NEWS
August 17, 2002
Arthur E. Clark Jr., a former manager of the Maryland Club, died of colon cancer Aug. 10 at his Sherwood Forest summer home. He was 89 and lived in Vero Beach, Fla. Born in Baltimore and reared in Ruxton, Mr. Clark was a graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned his bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1935. During World War II, he served with the Army Signal Corps. Mr. Clark managed the Maryland Club during the 1950s and 1960s. In his retirement, he spent his time managing his investments, and his primary philanthropic interest was the university.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | August 20, 1995
A six-alarm fire was ravaging the historic Maryland Club at Charles and Eager streets in downtown Baltimore early today.The fire, which witnesses said apparently started on the building's second floor, was so intense when the first firefighters arrived minutes after 11 p.m. that five more alarms were sounded immediately -- an unusual move by the city fire department, which usually summons additional equipment in smaller increments.Forty-five minutes later, flames were still visible on the second floor, shooting out of windows onto a porch on the front of the majestic building.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1996
Almost one year after a seven-alarm fire nearly destroyed the Maryland Club, the Mount Vernon landmark will reopen tomorrow bearing few signs of damage.Carpenters, plasterers and other artisans have been rushing for months to restore the 1891 building at Charles and Eager streets to its original appearance, working to finish before the busy fall social season."The place looks beautiful," said club president Richard C. Riggs Jr. "I think everybody will be enormously proud of the way it turned out."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 1, 2008
James E. Beverly, a retired director of contracts and a former Maryland Lacrosse Club official, died of multiple system atrophy Sept. 19 at his Severna Park home. He was 74. Mr. Beverly was born in Baltimore and raised in Federal Hill. He was a 1951 graduate of Southern High School, where he wrestled and played attack on the school's lacrosse team. At the University of Baltimore, where he earned a degree in industrial management in 1956, Mr. Beverly continued wrestling and playing lacrosse.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
Bill Miles came home from vacation last summer, picked up a newspaper and said: "I'm going to have a busy day."He's been busy ever since.When the Maryland Club was hit by a six-alarm fire in August, Mr. Miles found himself with a unique key to its restoration -- detailed documentation of every pane of stained glass in the 105-year-old Baltimore landmark."
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Baltimore's private dining clubs, longtime bastions of business networking and deal-making, are loosening up in an effort to attract a younger generation to keep their doors open. Dress codes are easing and lower dues are offered for young members at the Engineers Club of Baltimore in Mount Vernon and the Center Club downtown on the 16th floor of the Transamerica tower. Both have invested millions of dollars over the last five years to revamp aging facilities and maintain the appeal of exclusivity to attract those with money to spend.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, Aaron Dodson and Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
Tom Chuckas , president and chief operating officer of the Maryland Jockey Club, said Saturday that he would like to see horse racing's Triple Crown events played out over two months, not five weeks. Speaking to reporters at Pimlico Race Course three hours before post time for the 139th Preakness, Chuckas reiterated his position that a longer recovery period for horses would better benefit them and business in general. "Look, I'm not anti-tradition. I have great respect for tradition.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Leonard A. Siems, founder of Siems Rental & Sales Co. Inc., a heavy construction equipment rental firm, died May 7 of a heart attack at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 86. "He enjoyed the equipment rental business and wanted to become a leader in the business. and became one," said Marvin W. Abbott, former president of Siems Rental & Sales Co. Inc. "He became one of the top leaders in the area. " The son of Leonard Arnold Augustus Siems, a banker who was vice chairman of the Suburban Trust Co., and Marie Wekenman Siems, a homemaker, Leonard Arnold Siems was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park.
SPORTS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Ticket sales for Saturday's 139th Preakness are running ahead of last year, as the event's past success and star power of featured musical acts allow organizers to curtail advertising. With the spotlight on the Kentucky Derby winner California Chrome and musical headliner Lorde, Maryland Jockey Club President Tom Chuckas said Monday that most seats outside the Pimlico Race Course infield are sold out, as they were last year at this time. He said sales are running about 2 percent higher than last year, when Orb, a horse with Maryland connections, won the Derby and was headed to the Preakness.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
The purse for the 2014 Preakness has increased from $1 million to $1.5 million, the Maryland Jockey Club announced today. It's the first increase of the Triple Crown race's purse since 1998. The second jewel of the Triple Crown will be run next year on May 17 at Pimlico Race Course. “The Preakness Stakes is the centerpiece of a terrific stakes program that weekend,” Maryland Jockey Club president Tom Chuckas said in a statement. “Seventeen of the twenty-six races on Preakness and Black-Eyed Susan days are stakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Korman and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
What was the hardest lesson you've learned so far? "That you've got to educate the public on the realities of horse racing. They only hear about the negatives -- breakdowns and drugs -- and think that we mistreat the horses. That simply is not true. " What's a fact about yourself that will surprise people? "I could go work in the barns tomorrow and do pretty much any job. I could clean a stall or hot-walk a horse. I know the sport at every level. " What do you do to relax?
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
With a new long-term racing deal in place, increased breeding activity in the state and planned improvements to Maryland's two thoroughbred tracks, horse racing seems to be barreling toward a brighter future in a state where it had once been so important. Bettors have been slower to catch on, though. Total handle at Pimlico Race Course for the 36-day meet increased 12 percent to $188 million, the track announced Tuesday. But the per-day handle dropped 12 percent,  from $5.2 million to $4.6 million, thanks in part to seven racing days added so that the meet would span the entire length of the Triple Crown.
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA | October 3, 1993
Aquietude settles in the vast rooms, over the fruniture with its heft and antique texture; it invests the dark bar and bright reading room alike and even governs the movements of the servants as they glide through. Motes drift in the sun by a window. Time is kept outside, at bay.There are only men here. The sense of caste is thick among them. It is a lair of men, and those excluded from this company often believe the strangest things about it. That its members have limitless influence and wealth.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 28, 2008
Carter Burwell Roulette, a financial adviser and a Morgan Stanley vice president, died Friday of undetermined causes at his home in Sparks. He was 35. "We are waiting for the results of an autopsy to determine the cause of death," said his father, the Rev. Philip Burwell Roulette, retired rector of St. John's Episcopal Church in Glyndon and a Rodgers Forge resident. Mr. Roulette was born in Baltimore and was raised in the St. John's rectory. He was a 1985 graduate of Calvert School and attended St. Paul's School and Franklin High School.
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