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NEWS
June 19, 2014
Emily Blumenauer's commentary instructing teachers "quit complaining about Common Core" is an example of how the follow-the-crowd mentality of our society seeks to silence those brave enough to stand up to wrongs ( "Quit complaining about Common Core," June 16). The complacent don't want to hear from dissenters because it makes their own submissive obedience so obvious. Many teachers are raising concerns about the implementation of Common Core not only on their own behalf but on behalf of their students as well.
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NEWS
June 19, 2014
Emily Blumenauer's commentary instructing teachers "quit complaining about Common Core" is an example of how the follow-the-crowd mentality of our society seeks to silence those brave enough to stand up to wrongs ( "Quit complaining about Common Core," June 16). The complacent don't want to hear from dissenters because it makes their own submissive obedience so obvious. Many teachers are raising concerns about the implementation of Common Core not only on their own behalf but on behalf of their students as well.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Fewer children were poisoned by lead-based paint in 2011 than in any year since Maryland began tracking cases nearly two decades ago, prompting the state to expand its focus to newer rental properties and owner-occupied homes. A survey released Thursday by the state Department of the Environment showed 452 children had dangerous lead levels in their blood last year, down from more than 14,500 youngsters who tested positive for the substance in 1993. In 2010, 531 children were found to have the same level of lead poisoning.
NEWS
April 22, 2014
It is unfortunate that two articles in Sunday's Sun referred to Maryland's health care exchange as "failed" ( "Race for Maryland governor turns negative," April 20) and "one of the worst" ( "Gansler spot critical of health exchange 'debacle,'" April 20) without also mentioning that Maryland has expanded health care coverage under the Affordable Care Act to over 320,000 people - well above the original goal of 260,000. Among those new enrollees are people like Nancy Hughes, a former Maryland schoolteacher who lost her job and was in desperate need of health care services, which she could not afford.
HEALTH
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
Brasen VonMoose-Lemin stared at the money spread over the family dining room table and knew immediately that he had outdone himself. The 7-year-old from Glen Burnie had raised the money with his family to donate to the University of Maryland Children's Hospital for treating his leukemia. After an April 30 fundraiser that included a lemonade stand, brownie sales and raffles, family members knew they had done well. But $1,800? "That was the most money I had ever seen!" said Brasen, a student at George Cromwell Elementary School who has pledged to continue to do fundraisers for the hospital, which has helped to put his leukemia in remission.
NEWS
By Norman Tinanoff and Richard Ranney | November 7, 2000
IN MARYLAND, poor children have a critical health-care problem with dental cavities and lack of access to dental care. Oral health is inseparable from overall health. Every day in Maryland, the lack of oral health care results in severe pain, impaired eating ability, speech difficulties and problems associated with chronic infection. It has an adverse impact on social and financial well-being because of poor appearance and the inability to concentrate because of suffering and pain. There is evidence that schoolchildren with dental pain have increased numbers of missed school days and have a reduced capacity to succeed academically.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2000
Maryland has improved its ranking in the most recent edition of a national survey that measures conditions for children, moving to 22nd in the country this year on the strength of its wealth and the declining numbers of students dropping out of school. But Jann Jackson, executive director of Advocates for Children and Youth in Baltimore, said that although Maryland is doing better, the gap between its haves and have-nots is larger than that of other states. Maryland remained near the bottom of the country in its rate of infant deaths and low-weight babies, according to the annual Kids Count Data Book, which is to be released today in Washington, D.C. Maryland ranked best in its rate of child poverty, which was seventh-lowest in the nation.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
The Abilities Network, a nonprofit organization providing individualized services, training and support for Maryland children and adults with disabilities and their families, said it has received a $1.2 million grant from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation to support its $5 million capital campaign. The Abilities Network and its sister organization, the Epilepsy Foundation of the Chesapeake Region, serve more than 2,000 children and adults each year and employ about 150 people in five regional offices throughout Maryland.
NEWS
By Julie Turkewitz and Julie Turkewitz,Sun reporter | July 26, 2007
Maryland is one of the nation's wealthiest states, yet its infant mortality rate increased 11 percent between 2000 to 2004 and ranked as the nation's ninth worst, according to the 2007 Kids Count Databook, a report released yesterday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. "Maryland's current rate of 8.4 infant deaths per 1,000 live births is nearly 23 percent higher than the national rate," says the report, also noting that the number of low birth-weight babies increased by 8 percent and was more than 15 percent higher than the national rate.
NEWS
By Rebecca Wagner and Bruce Lesley | December 16, 2012
As the federal "fiscal cliff" approaches, an important group of Marylanders with a lot on the line has been largely ignored: children. The stakes are immense, because the recession has been hard on Maryland children, with one out of every seven living in poverty. A recent analysis by the nonpartisan Urban Institute found that nearly 120,000 Maryland children live with an unemployed parent - about triple the population of Annapolis. Compared to 2007, that's a 180 percent increase, and when you look at kids living with a long-term unemployed parent, the increase is 320 percent.
NEWS
April 13, 2014
Columnist Dan Rodricks rightly asks what all the celebrating is about regarding the accomplishments of the 2014 Maryland General Assembly ( "Underwhelmed by the Md. legislature," April 9). He also calls the $4.3 million allocated this year for expanded pre-kindergarten education in our state "paltry. " I agree that it is too soon to celebrate. Instead, the confetti will fall for the estimated 1,600 4-year-olds who will benefit from pre-K expansion when they graduate from high school - an accomplishment they are far more likely to achieve thanks to this legislation.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | February 18, 2014
The number of children in Maryland with untreated tooth decay dropped 41 percent from 2001 to 2011, according to a new state report. The assessment of children in kindergarten and third gradeĀ  was conducted by the University of Maryland School of Dentistry on behalf of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Office of Oral Health. The overall oral health status of Maryland children improved over the last decade, the report found. Researchers said the improvement came after reforms adopted when a 12-year-old from Prince George's County child died because of a preventable tooth infection.
NEWS
By Rebecca Wagner and Bruce Lesley | December 16, 2012
As the federal "fiscal cliff" approaches, an important group of Marylanders with a lot on the line has been largely ignored: children. The stakes are immense, because the recession has been hard on Maryland children, with one out of every seven living in poverty. A recent analysis by the nonpartisan Urban Institute found that nearly 120,000 Maryland children live with an unemployed parent - about triple the population of Annapolis. Compared to 2007, that's a 180 percent increase, and when you look at kids living with a long-term unemployed parent, the increase is 320 percent.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Fewer children were poisoned by lead-based paint in 2011 than in any year since Maryland began tracking cases nearly two decades ago, prompting the state to expand its focus to newer rental properties and owner-occupied homes. A survey released Thursday by the state Department of the Environment showed 452 children had dangerous lead levels in their blood last year, down from more than 14,500 youngsters who tested positive for the substance in 1993. In 2010, 531 children were found to have the same level of lead poisoning.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
Fewer Maryland children are living in high-poverty neighborhoods than a decade ago, but the lingering economic slump has left more parents without a steady paycheck, theAnnie E. Casey Foundationreported Wednesday. The Baltimore-based charity ranks Maryland 10th in the nation for overall child well-being in its 2012 Kids Count Data Book, which analyzed nationwide research and statistics on children's economic well-being, education, health, family and community. Becky Wagner, executive director of Advocates for Children and Youth, said the report shows that the state has made "good, solid advancements," but Maryland must keep working to close the remaining gaps.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2012
The number of young children deemed at risk of lead poisoning in Maryland and nationwide expanded drastically Wednesday as a federal health agency declared it would effectively cut in half its threshold for diagnosing the environmental illness. Acknowledging mounting evidence that children can suffer lasting harm from ingesting even minute amounts of lead, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it would reduce the level at which it recommends that doctors, families and health authorities act to lower a child's exposure to the toxic metal.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | July 26, 1992
Fewer Maryland children are dying in firearms accidents at home, but more are being gunned down on the streets, researchers say.Gunfire took the lives of 92 Maryland children under age 16 in the past four years, and the rates of homicide and handgun use in firearms deaths increased sharply, University of Maryland medical school researchers have found."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | October 19, 1992
Maryland's children are less likely than ever to live with both their parents -- and when they do, the parents usually must juggle child-rearing and work, according to a study being released today.Only 22 percent of Maryland children in 1990 lived in the "traditional family of breadwinner dad and homemaker mom" where one parent works and the other stays home, says the national report by the Center for the Study of Social Policy, a Washington think tank. In only eight U.S. states did a smaller percentage of children live in traditional families.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | April 19, 2012
More than 100,000 Maryland children whose families got mortgages in the middle part of the last decade have lost their family home to foreclosure or were dangerously close to it as of last year, according to a new report . That's one out of every 11 children in the state, which ties Maryland for the sixth-highest share nationwide. The study, from the child-centered group First Focus in Washington, looked at the swath foreclosure has cut through families across the country.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
One in 88 American children has an autism spectrum disorder, according to a new estimate from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The rate is 23 percent higher than one the agency released three years ago. Federal officials said some of the increase is attributable to better diagnoses, though it's not clear how much. "We don't know what causes autism, but a lot of children have autism," said Li-Ching Lee, a psychiatric epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health and the principal investigator for the CDC's Maryland data.
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