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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 1, 2013
Among the hundreds of new laws taking effect Tuesday (Oct. 1) is one meant to help the Chesapeake Bay by limiting when, where and how Marylanders should feed their lawns. One scientist, though, suggests homeowners could help the bay better by forgoing lawn fertilizer altogether. The Fertilizer Use Act of 2011 restricts the nutrient content of all grass food sold in Maryland, barring phosphorus from most lawn-care products and setting limits on how much nitrogen should be applied.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
Robert V. Hess, who turned his experience as manager of a disabled veterans thrift store into a career as a homelessness solutions expert, died of liver cancer Dec. 24 at his home in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. The former Perry Hall resident was 57. After working in Baltimore for 25 years, he held top posts in Philadelphia and New York, where he was commissioner of the Department of Homeless Services. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Bernard Lawrence Hess, a city schools psychologist, and Barbara Ann Neumeister Hess, a DuPont manager.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2013
Anna Whetstone, 23, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis when she was 17. She was a high school junior in Hershey, Pa., playing on her school's field hockey team when she got hit in the head with a ball. "I was feeling fine at the time," she said, but over the next few days she had trouble with balance and "wasn't feeling well overall. " Computed tomography scans and an MRI discovered the telltale lesions that are signs of the degenerative disease. After the diagnosis, Whetstone switched from playing to coaching field hockey, but she continued dancing and she earned a neuroscience degree, with honors, at Moravian College in Pennsylvania.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 12, 2013
The Chesapeake Bay's cleanup may be delayed "several decades" by the slow pace at which farm pollution is being flushed from ground water on the Delmarva Peninsula, a new study says. The research by the U.S. Geological Survey also suggests pollution control efforts on Eastern Shore farms may need to be increased in order to achieve hoped-for water quality improvements. Using a computer model to simulate ground-water flows, USGS scientists found that when nitrogen from fertilized farm fields on the Shore soaks into the ground, it takes 20 to 40 years on average for the nutrient-laden water to make its way underground into streams and rivers.  Ground water now oozing into bay tributaries is likely carrying pollution picked up by rainfall decades ago, researchers said.
NEWS
May 10, 1991
As part of the campaign to enhance productivity and quality, the U.S. Senate has established the U.S. Senate Productivity Award.The award will honor organizations that have significantly improved productivity.The categories for competition include manufacturing, service andsmall businesses.The selection process will be handled by an independent committee, established by Maryland Sens. Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski, in cooperation with the Maryland Center for Quality and Productivity.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Former Baltimore Raven Orlando Brown died of a diabetic complication that is rarely fatal but can sometimes be quick to strike - and he might not even have known he had the underlying disease. The 40-year-old died in his Inner Harbor condominium Sept. 23 from diabetic ketoacidosis, but there were no signs he was taking insulin to treat diabetes or that a doctor had ever diagnosed him with the disease, according to the state's chief medical examiner. "We did not manage to find any evidence at the scene that indicated he had a medical diagnosis of diabetes," said medical examiner David Fowler.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Maryland faces a revenue shortfall of $238 million over the next 15 months, state officials warned Thursday , necessitating tough choices in balancing the state's budget in the final weeks of the General Assembly . The Board of Revenue Estimates adjusted downward what it had projected in December the state would collect in fiscal 2014 and 2015 from taxes, gambling proceeds and other sources. Revenue for the remainder of this budget year was expected to be $127 million short, while the shortfall for the next year was projected to be $111 million.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Five companies with operations in Maryland received awards yesterday at a conference sponsored by the Maryland Center for Quality & Productivity and the American Society for Quality Control.The companies that received the awards were Bausch & Lomb Eyeware Division in Oakland, IBM Corp. -- Federal Systems Co. in Gaithersburg, Maryland Plastics Inc. of Federalsburg, Perdue Edible Oil Refinery in Salisbury and McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. of Seabrook.The Bausch & Lomb division, received the Senate Productivity Award for Manufacturing.
SPORTS
January 3, 2003
The number 814 Career assists by UM's Steve Blake, who is 21st all-time and fifth in ACC history. He said it "If you try to rush the game, it won't come to you. Let the game come to you." Ryan Randle, Maryland center
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Five companies with operations in Maryland received awards yesterday at a conference sponsored by the Maryland Center for Quality & Productivity and the American Society for Quality Control.The companies that received the awards were Bausch & Lomb Eyeware Division in Oakland, IBM Corp. -- Federal Systems Co. in Gaithersburg, Maryland Plastics Inc. of Federalsburg, Perdue Edible Oil Refinery in Salisbury and McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. of Seabrook.The Bausch & Lomb division, received the Senate Productivity Award for Manufacturing.
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