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Letter to The Aegis | May 7, 2013
Editor: A recent Aegis editorial about the health of the Chesapeake Bay ("Stormwater fee set low in Harford the best of a bad situation," April 23) is [off base]. Certainly the job of restoring the Bay is far from finished, but the Aegis is incorrect in asserting: "the degree to which the overall health of the bay has improved is hard to gauge. " Numerous recent reports from government agencies, and academic and non-profit researchers show significant improvements in the Bay. Most recently, the Chesapeake Bay Program (an arm of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency)
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NEWS
September 29, 2014
Reginald V. Truitt was a zoologist at the University of Maryland and a pioneer in scientific studies to better understand and protect the precious resources of the Chesapeake Bay. In 1925, Truitt founded the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory in Solomons, which became the foundation for what is now the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES). It is truly fitting that UMCES has a prestigious environmental award in his name, but what would Truitt think of the most recent award winner?
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
Bythella V. Johnson lost so much — about $3,000 — on slot machines during a recent trip to Atlantic City with her husband, Gary, to celebrate their 46th wedding anniversary that he threatened to cut the trip short if she didn't ease up. The slots are closer than ever now for Johnson, who has pursued the big hit from Las Vegas to Maryland Live, even on the mock slots at Bingo World in Glen Burnie. You'd figure she'd be thrilled about Horseshoe Casino Baltimore and its 2,500 machines opening even closer to her Pikesville home, but she says she's not. "I don't care if they open up," said Johnson, who has won a few jackpots in her time.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 1, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley drew praise and protesters in Baltimore Tuesday night for his handling of environmental issues. The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Scienc e gave the two-term Democrat an award for his leadership in the long-running effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay and in committing the state to reducing climate-altering greenhouse gas emissions. "Governor O'Malley has listened to science in striving for Chesapeake Bay restoration and sustainable growth in Maryland," Donald F. Boesch, the center's president, said in a release announcing the award.  "His leadership in responding to climate change through energy conservation and transformation has set a national standard.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
Seven Maryland health care centers that received tainted steroids linked to a nationwide meningitis outbreak will be required to turn over documents and give testimony under subpoenas filed last week in a federal lawsuit. A steering committee of lawyers representing patients who were given doses of the medication filed 76 of the subpoenas across the country. Patients in 22 states received injections of the steroids last year before they were recalled; 745 of them developed fungal meningitis or other health issues as a result, and 58 died.
SPORTS
April 22, 2012
In an interview with Capitol Hoops, Maryland center signee Shaquille Cleare talked about playing with his future Terps teammates at the Capital Classic on Saturday.
NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | December 6, 2013
The objects displayed on a shelf in the depths of UAV Solutions' headquarters in Jessup might look like toys, out of context. To the untrained eye, the plastic doodads - some thick, some thin, some glossy, others matte, and in a variety of subdued colors, like black, brown, tan and white - could be sandcastle molds, toy submarines - maybe DEVO hats in conservative hues. The reality is much more practical: They're parts of engines, circuit boards, radios. And each was printed by one of the company's 3D printers.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Saying climate change is already underway, a panel of scientists is urging Maryland officials to plan to accommodate rising seas of up to 2 feet along the state's shoreline in the next 40 years — and perhaps nearly 6 feet by the end of the century. In a report to be released Wednesday and commissioned by Gov. Martin O'Malley, the group of 21 scientists from Maryland, Virginia and other mid-Atlantic states said recent, more sophisticated studies suggest that sea level is rising faster than forecast just five years ago. With 3,100 miles of bay and ocean coastline, Maryland is vulnerable to a rising sea level, experts say. The state has 450 facilities and about 400 miles of roads and highways in low-lying areas that could experience flooding aggravated by climate change, according to state officials.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Five companies with operations in Maryland received awards yesterday at a conference sponsored by the Maryland Center for Quality & Productivity and the American Society for Quality Control.The companies that received the awards were Bausch & Lomb Eyeware Division in Oakland, IBM Corp. -- Federal Systems Co. in Gaithersburg, Maryland Plastics Inc. of Federalsburg, Perdue Edible Oil Refinery in Salisbury and McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. of Seabrook.The Bausch & Lomb division, received the Senate Productivity Award for Manufacturing.
SPORTS
January 3, 2003
The number 814 Career assists by UM's Steve Blake, who is 21st all-time and fifth in ACC history. He said it "If you try to rush the game, it won't come to you. Let the game come to you." Ryan Randle, Maryland center
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