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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
Bythella V. Johnson lost so much — about $3,000 — on slot machines during a recent trip to Atlantic City with her husband, Gary, to celebrate their 46th wedding anniversary that he threatened to cut the trip short if she didn't ease up. The slots are closer than ever now for Johnson, who has pursued the big hit from Las Vegas to Maryland Live, even on the mock slots at Bingo World in Glen Burnie. You'd figure she'd be thrilled about Horseshoe Casino Baltimore and its 2,500 machines opening even closer to her Pikesville home, but she says she's not. "I don't care if they open up," said Johnson, who has won a few jackpots in her time.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
Republican David R. Craig said Tuesday that he would push to cut the state income tax rate for Maryland's wealthiest residents by more than 20 percent during his first year as governor. Craig, one of four GOP candidates running in June's primary, said his plan would put Maryland on a course to eliminate its income tax entirely during his second term while cutting spending by 3 percent a year. He said such a move would stimulate economic growth and halt a loss of population to states with lower taxes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Douglas W. Henley, former executive director of the War Memorial and a Carroll County restaurateur, died Wednesday at his Mount Airy home of pancreatic cancer. He was 67. Douglas Wade Henley was born in Baltimore and raised in Mount Airy. After graduating in 1965 from Mount Airy High School, he enlisted in the Navy, where he served as a machinist's mate third class until being discharged in 1969. From 1998 until retiring in 2012, Mr. Henley was the executive director of Baltimore's War Memorial.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | May 7, 2013
Editor: A recent Aegis editorial about the health of the Chesapeake Bay ("Stormwater fee set low in Harford the best of a bad situation," April 23) is [off base]. Certainly the job of restoring the Bay is far from finished, but the Aegis is incorrect in asserting: "the degree to which the overall health of the bay has improved is hard to gauge. " Numerous recent reports from government agencies, and academic and non-profit researchers show significant improvements in the Bay. Most recently, the Chesapeake Bay Program (an arm of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency)
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 1, 2013
Among the hundreds of new laws taking effect Tuesday (Oct. 1) is one meant to help the Chesapeake Bay by limiting when, where and how Marylanders should feed their lawns. One scientist, though, suggests homeowners could help the bay better by forgoing lawn fertilizer altogether. The Fertilizer Use Act of 2011 restricts the nutrient content of all grass food sold in Maryland, barring phosphorus from most lawn-care products and setting limits on how much nitrogen should be applied.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Paul Capriolo and the crew at Social Growth Technologies are looking forward to graduation, having spent years getting ready for the world outside this one-story beige building in Columbia. The Maryland Center for Entrepreneurship is not a school, but it does cultivate business and launch its charges toward bigger things. In fall 2009, Capriolo, partner Patrick Jenkins and an intern started in one office at the building; the company now has 22 employees, occupying about a dozen offices and some 5,000 square feet - a third of the space available for lease at MCE. By this summer, they expect to move to offices in Columbia three times that size.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
Living with diabetes A diabetes educator will lead a discussion and offer suggestions on how to make simple nutrition and exercise changes to help achieve weight loss, lower blood pressure and cholesterol to prevent diabetes. Sponsored by the Baltimore Washington Medical Center, the discussion will be held from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. May 1 and from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. May 9, in the Diabetes and Endocrinology Center, Suite 119, 300 Hospital Drive, Glen Burnie. Cost: $25. Registration and information 410-787-4940.
SPORTS
April 22, 2012
In an interview with Capitol Hoops, Maryland center signee Shaquille Cleare talked about playing with his future Terps teammates at the Capital Classic on Saturday.
NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | December 6, 2013
The objects displayed on a shelf in the depths of UAV Solutions' headquarters in Jessup might look like toys, out of context. To the untrained eye, the plastic doodads - some thick, some thin, some glossy, others matte, and in a variety of subdued colors, like black, brown, tan and white - could be sandcastle molds, toy submarines - maybe DEVO hats in conservative hues. The reality is much more practical: They're parts of engines, circuit boards, radios. And each was printed by one of the company's 3D printers.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Rising at the center of the sprawling casino floor at Maryland Live at Arundel Mills — a prime piece of money-making real estate, if there ever was one — aren't shiny new slot machines or table games. Instead, an Asian-themed eatery is being constructed for chefs to begin serving up dim sum and wok-fried noodles in clear view of an 80-person seating area. The new addition, which replaces a tiny noodle bar that's been slammed by demand for months, is just one example of how Maryland Live is placing a heavy bet on catering to Maryland's growing Asian population.
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