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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Rising at the center of the sprawling casino floor at Maryland Live at Arundel Mills — a prime piece of money-making real estate, if there ever was one — aren't shiny new slot machines or table games. Instead, an Asian-themed eatery is being constructed for chefs to begin serving up dim sum and wok-fried noodles in clear view of an 80-person seating area. The new addition, which replaces a tiny noodle bar that's been slammed by demand for months, is just one example of how Maryland Live is placing a heavy bet on catering to Maryland's growing Asian population.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Former Baltimore Raven Orlando Brown died of a diabetic complication that is rarely fatal but can sometimes be quick to strike - and he might not even have known he had the underlying disease. The 40-year-old died in his Inner Harbor condominium Sept. 23 from diabetic ketoacidosis, but there were no signs he was taking insulin to treat diabetes or that a doctor had ever diagnosed him with the disease, according to the state's chief medical examiner. "We did not manage to find any evidence at the scene that indicated he had a medical diagnosis of diabetes," said medical examiner David Fowler.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
Robert V. Hess, who turned his experience as manager of a disabled veterans thrift store into a career as a homelessness solutions expert, died of liver cancer Dec. 24 at his home in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. The former Perry Hall resident was 57. After working in Baltimore for 25 years, he held top posts in Philadelphia and New York, where he was commissioner of the Department of Homeless Services. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Bernard Lawrence Hess, a city schools psychologist, and Barbara Ann Neumeister Hess, a DuPont manager.
NEWS
November 10, 2013
In response to a recent article in The Sun on the Maryland Center for Excellence on Early Intervention for Serious Mental Illness, Rene Muller suggests that murder may be an understandable response to overwhelming anxiety and trauma and efforts to treat these people with medications may be misguided. In the process of putting forth this argument in his commentary, "Mental health profession falls short in stopping violence" (Oct. 28), Mr. Muller reduces the treatment of mental illnesses with psychotic symptoms to the choice between pharmacological and psychosocial intervention and does his readers a further disservice by inaccurately portraying the mission of Maryland's Center for Excellence on Early Intervention for Serious Mental Illness.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Teachers in Maryland are about to get new help and encouragement to talk about the touchy topic of global warming in their classrooms. The National Science Foundation announced Wednesday that it is awarding $5.8 million for improving climate-change education in Maryland and Delaware through a partnership including universities and school systems from both states. The two-state initiative is one of six such education projects the foundation is funding across the country and in the nation's Pacific island territories.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Saying climate change is already underway, a panel of scientists is urging Maryland officials to plan to accommodate rising seas of up to 2 feet along the state's shoreline in the next 40 years — and perhaps nearly 6 feet by the end of the century. In a report to be released Wednesday and commissioned by Gov. Martin O'Malley, the group of 21 scientists from Maryland, Virginia and other mid-Atlantic states said recent, more sophisticated studies suggest that sea level is rising faster than forecast just five years ago. With 3,100 miles of bay and ocean coastline, Maryland is vulnerable to a rising sea level, experts say. The state has 450 facilities and about 400 miles of roads and highways in low-lying areas that could experience flooding aggravated by climate change, according to state officials.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Five companies with operations in Maryland received awards yesterday at a conference sponsored by the Maryland Center for Quality & Productivity and the American Society for Quality Control.The companies that received the awards were Bausch & Lomb Eyeware Division in Oakland, IBM Corp. -- Federal Systems Co. in Gaithersburg, Maryland Plastics Inc. of Federalsburg, Perdue Edible Oil Refinery in Salisbury and McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. of Seabrook.The Bausch & Lomb division, received the Senate Productivity Award for Manufacturing.
SPORTS
January 3, 2003
The number 814 Career assists by UM's Steve Blake, who is 21st all-time and fifth in ACC history. He said it "If you try to rush the game, it won't come to you. Let the game come to you." Ryan Randle, Maryland center
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Five companies with operations in Maryland received awards yesterday at a conference sponsored by the Maryland Center for Quality & Productivity and the American Society for Quality Control.The companies that received the awards were Bausch & Lomb Eyeware Division in Oakland, IBM Corp. -- Federal Systems Co. in Gaithersburg, Maryland Plastics Inc. of Federalsburg, Perdue Edible Oil Refinery in Salisbury and McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. of Seabrook.The Bausch & Lomb division, received the Senate Productivity Award for Manufacturing.
SPORTS
April 22, 2012
In an interview with Capitol Hoops, Maryland center signee Shaquille Cleare talked about playing with his future Terps teammates at the Capital Classic on Saturday.
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