Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaryland Casualty
IN THE NEWS

Maryland Casualty

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
Four weeks after Los Angeles-area businessman Edward V. Dempsey bought an insurance policy from Maryland Casualty Co., his construction company burned to the ground. It was an accident, he said, caused when spilled fuel caught fire.But what followed for three years, a Los Angeles jury found this week, was no accident.Through a series of delays and harassing maneuvers, Maryland Casualty intentionally worked to deny paying Mr. Dempsey's claim, the jury agreed. Ruling in favor of the businessman, the panel came in with a remarkable verdict: the insurer was ordered to pay $3 million for the claim -- and $58 million in punitive damages.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 11, 2009
An article in Friday's Baltimore Sun told how Zurich American will be moving its city work force from Keswick Road in the Wyman Park-University Parkway area to quarters in Baltimore County. I thought of an afternoon, nearly 40 years ago, when I took a last look at that same site. In the late 1960s, Zurich's predecessor, the old Maryland Casualty Co., was repositioning itself on the 23-acre work campus it owned at the corner of 40th Street and Keswick Road. Its main building went on to become The Rotunda, which made a successful debut in 1971 as a shopping venue.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | August 28, 1991
Maryland Casualty Co. has been ordered to pay nearly $7.9 million to a San Diego business that claimed the insurer failed to properly defend the company in a multimillion-dollar legal battle.A San Diego Superior Court judge strongly admonished the Baltimore-based insurer for improperly arguing that its customer's policy had lapsed and failing to provide a full legal defense for the policyholder."I think that there has to be a message sent to the corporate board, and there has to be a flushing-out of this attitude that has been demonstrated by this case," Judge Donald Meloche said from the bench during a June 20 hearing at which punitive damages were first set at $2.2 million.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 7, 2007
Joseph Moye Eddins Sr., an Army Air Forces pilot who flew cargo missions over the Himalayas after World War II and later became a vice president of the Maryland Casualty Co., died Friday of heart failure at the Riderwood Erickson Retirement Community in Silver Spring. The former Towson resident was 83. Mr. Eddins was born and raised in Troy, Ala., and during his senior year of high school passed the exams for the Army Air Forces cadet-training program. After graduating from high school in 1943, he reported to Dos Palos, Calif.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1999
In a reorganization of its U.S. commercial insurance businesses, Zurich Financial Services Group could lay off as many as 850 employees -- including an unspecified number in Baltimore -- a top company official said yesterday.Frank A. Patalano, chief executive of the newly created subsidiary Zurich Services, also said Baltimore is no longer the headquarters for the Swiss company's commercial and small business insurance operations, which will be directed from Schaumburg, Ill. The Baltimore and Schaumburg operations have been folded into another newly created subsidiary, Zurich U.S.Patalano, who works out of Schaumburg and has run the Baltimore operations since Dec. 1, said the company expects to save $80 million to $100 million over the next two years by consolidating redundant operations and cutting costs.
FEATURES
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 27, 2006
When developer Bernard Manekin and his partners converted the old Maryland Casualty Co. headquarters to a shopping and office center in the early 1970s, they were ahead of their time. There weren't many examples of old buildings being recycled for new uses, in Baltimore or elsewhere in the country, during those years. Manekin's venture, the Rotunda at 711 W. 40th St., became both an anchor and an amenity for the neighborhoods around it. Now new owners are seeking to build on that pioneering effort and use the 11.5-acre Rotunda property to create the next generation of urban development, while preserving the landmark structure that made it so distinctive in the first place.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1998
The Tower Building, which stood in the 200 block of East Baltimore Street from 1912 until its lamentable destruction in 1986, was a graceful, clock-crowned confection that soared some 18 stories into the air and was a landmark on the city's horizon.With its adjoining five-story main building, the complex, built by the Maryland Casualty Co., was home for years to lawyers, accountants, real estate brokers and the city's Bureau of Markets.Designed by Otto Simonson and costing $300,000, the tower, The Sun predicted it would be "one of the handsomest in the South."
BUSINESS
By Maria Mallory | September 12, 1990
After taking the plunge into automotive warranty underwriting four years ago, Baltimore insurance giant Maryland Casualty Co. is exiting that business, leaving behind a wake of red ink.As of Oct. 15, Maryland Casualty will cease underwriting extended service warranties sold to car buyers, said George F. Cass, Maryland Casualty executive vice president in charge of corporate underwriting.The insurer took over as primary underwriter to General Group International, an independent California-based marketer of the additional coverage, in 1986.
NEWS
October 29, 1990
Services for Carroll A. Bruehl, a retired employee of Maryland Casualty Company, will be held at 11 a.m. today at the Mitchell Wiedefeld Funeral Home, 6500 York Road.Mr. Bruehl, who was 82, died Thursday at St. Joseph Hospital of a bleeding ulcer.He went to work for Maryland Casualty before World War II, worked at the Bethlehem Steel shipyard during the war and then returned to the insurance company until he retired in the 1970s.His wife, the former Caroline Lillian Dorsey, died in 1968.He is survived by a daughter, Patricia B. Dryden of Baltimore, three grandsons and two great-granddaughters.
BUSINESS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 13, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland Casualty Co. officials figured they were free and clear. Their policy covering a Baltimore mechanical contracting firm now being sued by asbestosis victims had expired years ago.But the state Court of Appeals reshaped their thinking a bit yesterday. The company must pay legal fees to defend Lloyd E. Mitchell Inc., in each of the 3,000 asbestos cases filed against it and must pay any judgments against the firm, within policy limits, Maryland's highest court ruled.The "bodily injury" that plaintiffs cited in their suits occurred while Maryland Casualty's policies were in effect, even if the disease resulting from those injuries didn't surface for more than a decade, the unanimous court held.
FEATURES
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 27, 2006
When developer Bernard Manekin and his partners converted the old Maryland Casualty Co. headquarters to a shopping and office center in the early 1970s, they were ahead of their time. There weren't many examples of old buildings being recycled for new uses, in Baltimore or elsewhere in the country, during those years. Manekin's venture, the Rotunda at 711 W. 40th St., became both an anchor and an amenity for the neighborhoods around it. Now new owners are seeking to build on that pioneering effort and use the 11.5-acre Rotunda property to create the next generation of urban development, while preserving the landmark structure that made it so distinctive in the first place.
NEWS
June 7, 2005
CHARLIE MOELLER, born March 14, 1927 in Baltimore, MD, passed into eternal rest on May 30, 2005 in Fort Lauderdale, FL. Son of Charles Joseph and Anna Petry Moeller, brother to Eugene L. Moeller of Charleston, SC and Ann Marie Schindler of Baltimore, MD, Charlie was also the beloved brother-in-law to Joan Moeller and Joe Schindler and uncle to two generations of nieces and nephews. At the age of two, Charlie's family left Baltimore for Danville, VA where he grew up and began his education at Forest Hills Elementary School.
NEWS
May 10, 2005
Clementine Abbott, who worked her way up the ranks of the Maryland Casualty Co. to become a pioneering female insurance executive, died of respiratory failure Friday at Holly Hill Manor Nursing Home in Towson. She was 95. "In the early 1950s, Clementine told family that she was the only woman to lunch at the executive cafeteria of the Maryland Casualty Co. She was assistant corporate secretary, overseeing the library, licensing and other departments," said nephew William C. Dee of Idlewylde.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2004
When Spc. Erik Wayne Hayes left for Iraq shortly after Christmas, he told family members he was worried about his younger brother, Bradley, who was severely injured in a car accident two years ago. The 20-year- old is unable to communicate and is confined to a nursing facility in Hagerstown. The Army gave Erik Hayes emergency leave to be with his family at the time of the accident. He returned home as often as he could and spent hours at his brother's bedside. "It hurt him to leave his brother, and it made any communication very hard," said Hayes' mother, Debora Reckley of Thurmont.
NEWS
May 27, 2003
Virginia Wilmer Barncord, a local Girl Scout troop leader in the 1950s and 1960s, died of complications from pneumonia May 20 at Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 84. Born in Hampden as Virginia Wilmer, Mrs. Barncord was featured in a 1925 Sun article when she was a 6-year-old enduring multiple surgeries with valor. "She went into [the hospital to] have her appendix removed, and she had severe complications and infections, but she was always in such good spirits.
NEWS
May 15, 2003
Dr. Charles J. Blazek Jr., a retired internist and former Maryland Casualty Insurance Co. medical director, died of complications from an infection Sunday at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 82. Dr. Blazek was born in Baltimore and raised in Flushing, N.Y. He earned his undergraduate and medical degrees from Columbia University, and served in the Army briefly at the end of World War II. After completing a residency in internal medicine at Bellevue Hospital in New York City, he returned to Baltimore in 1950 and established a private medical practice on St. Paul Street.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 2, 1998
House Judiciary Republicans haven't found anything impeach-worthy yet, but they're still fishing.In the belief that nice guys finish last, the Orioles traded Eric Davis in for Albert Belle.Maryland Casualty is Zurich Group. Monumental Life is Aegon. Alex. Brown is Deutsche Bank. You get the idea.Quebecers don't want to secede. They want to keep talking about it.Pub Date: 12/02/98
NEWS
May 10, 2005
Clementine Abbott, who worked her way up the ranks of the Maryland Casualty Co. to become a pioneering female insurance executive, died of respiratory failure Friday at Holly Hill Manor Nursing Home in Towson. She was 95. "In the early 1950s, Clementine told family that she was the only woman to lunch at the executive cafeteria of the Maryland Casualty Co. She was assistant corporate secretary, overseeing the library, licensing and other departments," said nephew William C. Dee of Idlewylde.
NEWS
April 4, 2003
Athalee H. Goodwin, a retired insurance clerk and former Northeast Baltimore resident, died of lung cancer Tuesday in the hospice unit of Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown, Pa. She was 76. Born and raised Athalee Hardin in Jacksboro, Tenn., where she graduated from high school, she moved to Baltimore during World War II and took a job at Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. in Fairfield. Mrs. Goodwin retired in 1975 after a decade as a clerk at Maryland Casualty Insurance Co. She was married in 1946 to Raymond L. Goodwin.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.