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NEWS
By Mary Knudson | February 28, 1991
The Maryland Cancer Consortium and the state health department have issued the state's first cancer control plan, but the consortium chairman admitted it "only scratches the surface" of a major health problem that has worsened to the point that Maryland now has the highest cancer death rate of any state in the nation."
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HEALTH
October 11, 2012
A selection of resources for breast cancer patients and families: Nonprofits, charities and support groups Active Survivors Network Helps people affected by illness, disease and accidents to maintain an active lifestyle. activesurvivor.org or 410-823-0562 American Cancer Society Offers and links patients to education, support and assistance programs, such as Look Good...Feel Better, Wigs - Free or Reduced, Reach to Recovery, and more, at area locations. Holds the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk every October.
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NEWS
By Mary Knudson | January 23, 1991
Health officials who have been poring over the state's cancer statistics for the past few months said yesterday they believed that tobacco and alcohol use were the major reasons why Maryland led the nation in cancer death rates.At least 42 percent of Maryland's cancer deaths, including lung, pancreas, esophagus, bladder, pharynx, liver and larynx, are linked to either tobacco use, alcohol use or both, Dr. John Southard of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said yesterday. And the Maryland death rate for all of these cancers is higher than the U.S. average, he said.
HEALTH
May 4, 2012
The University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center is hosting its annual Maryland Half Marathon this Sunday from 8 a.m. to noon in the Maple Lawn community of Howard County. This is the race made famous by Dozer the Dog, who ran much of the course along with about 1,200 other runners. Proceeds will be used by the cancer center for breast cancer and health disparities research. There will be activities for kids as well as the 13.1-mile race. But Dozer will likely be a big draw.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson and Mary Knudson,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | July 10, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer announced yesterday the appointment of a Council on Cancer Control that will develop a program to prevent cancer and reduce Maryland's cancer death rate, the highest of any state in the nation."
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | May 11, 1991
Hoping to lower breast-cancer death rates by detecting the disease early, the University of Maryland Medical Center will crisscross the state in a new, $260,000 specially equipped mammography van, bringing low-cost screening mammograms to women at their workplaces and in their communities."
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | April 23, 1991
In an effort to cut Maryland's high rate of breast cancer deaths, hospitals in the state have been asked to develop a low-cost screening program for early detection and make it available to all women, including those who are poor and uneducated.Under the program, the maximum charge for a mammogram would be $45, and women who could not afford to pay this fee would get free care or be eligible for state medical assistance, said Paul Averill, program director of the Maryland Cancer Consortium.
NEWS
November 10, 1991
Esther Seabold, Retired nurseServices for Esther J. Seabold, a former nurse and longtime Baltimore resident, will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at the Sterling Ashton Funeral Home, 736 Edmondson Ave. in Catonsville.Mrs. Seabold, who was 79, died Friday of a heart attack at her home in the Guilford section of Baltimore.Born in Boston, she was a graduate of the Boston Children's Hospital Nursing School in 1933. She worked as a registered nurse at the hospital before moving to Baltimore in 1936.
FEATURES
By Daniel M. Amdur and Daniel M. Amdur,Contributing Writer | April 6, 1993
Maryland residents now have a new way to get information about breast and smoking-related cancers that's only a phone call away.A toll-free hot line has been established by the Maryland Cancer Control Program as part of a three-year campaign to reduce the state's cancer mortality rate.The hot line -- 1 (800) 477-9774 -- operates from noon to 8 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, and provides up-to-date information on breast and cervical cancer screening, the effects of secondhand smoke and other smoking-related issues.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 2, 1992
After losing members, friends and family to cancer, two related organizations pooled their efforts to raise $25,000 for a cold laboratory at the University of Maryland Cancer Center in Baltimore.The Knights of Pythias and its sister organization, Pythian Sisters, raised the money through the 2,100 members from chapters throughout the state.Carroll County played a key role this year. Four of the leaders in the statewide campaign are members of the Westminster lodge and temple.In the past, the men's and women's groups would raise money separately for projects.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2008
Across the state, minorities and residents of rural areas are under-represented in cancer trials, according to a new study from University of Maryland researchers. And the study found that rates of participation among African-Americans are dropping. "Everyone should have an equal chance of participating in a trial. That does not happen," said Shiraz I. Mishra, an associate professor at the School of Medicine and one of the study's authors. Outside researchers praised the report. "It's a very strong study.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1998
Declaring qualified success in combating cancer, Maryland health officials said yesterday the state has dropped from the nation's leader in cancer deaths to the fifth-worst state.The appraisal came yesterday from the Maryland State Council on Cancer Control, which released its first five-year compilation of cancer trends. The report showed that the most important measures -- cancer death and incidence rates -- dropped incrementally from 1992 through 1996.Death rates from the four leading cancer killers -- lung, colorectal, breast and prostate -- dropped over that period, as did rates of newly diagnosed cases.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
In a brick rowhouse, in the quiet of a cloudy Thursday morning, the medical students meet death.To the emaciated patients left demented by AIDS or wracked with cancer, they introduce themselves. Sometimes awkward, sometimes gentle, they try to reassure a 30-year-old man whose abdomen is swollen by cancer that he looks good. In the next room, the occupant died just a few hours before. All that's left is the strong scent of Lysol."This is the part I fear," confides Greg Cohen, 23, just beginning his third year at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, in the hallway of Baltimore's Joseph Richey Hospice.
NEWS
June 10, 1993
Theresa ShnipperPainter, sculptorTheresa Shnipper, a painter and sculptor, died Tuesday of cancer at the Baltimore home of a daughter.Mrs. Shnipper, 79, came to Baltimore in 1986 and lived on North Charles Street.She painted in oils and water colors, did pastel drawings and was a sculptor who worked in clay. Known as Terri, she studied at the Maryland Institute College of Art, the Walters Art Gallery and the Waxter Center.Her works have been exhibited at City Hall, the Lowe House Office Building in Annapolis and the Eubie Blake Cultural Center, where a statue she did of a Nigerian princess was featured in an exhibit.
FEATURES
By Daniel M. Amdur and Daniel M. Amdur,Contributing Writer | April 6, 1993
Maryland residents now have a new way to get information about breast and smoking-related cancers that's only a phone call away.A toll-free hot line has been established by the Maryland Cancer Control Program as part of a three-year campaign to reduce the state's cancer mortality rate.The hot line -- 1 (800) 477-9774 -- operates from noon to 8 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, and provides up-to-date information on breast and cervical cancer screening, the effects of secondhand smoke and other smoking-related issues.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
Maryland, the state that suffers more cancer deaths than any other, has good reason to welcome the construction of a Comprehensive Cancer Center at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. The center, to be built on the original site of the Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, will bring together all the departments involved in treating patients with cancer, including surgical specialties as well as chemotherapy and radiation therapy.That in itself would bring care for cancer patients to a new level.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
Maryland, the state that suffers more cancer deaths than any other, has good reason to welcome the construction of a Comprehensive Cancer Center at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. The center, to be built on the original site of the Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, will bring together all the departments involved in treating patients with cancer, including surgical specialties as well as chemotherapy and radiation therapy.That in itself would bring care for cancer patients to a new level.
NEWS
June 10, 1993
Theresa ShnipperPainter, sculptorTheresa Shnipper, a painter and sculptor, died Tuesday of cancer at the Baltimore home of a daughter.Mrs. Shnipper, 79, came to Baltimore in 1986 and lived on North Charles Street.She painted in oils and water colors, did pastel drawings and was a sculptor who worked in clay. Known as Terri, she studied at the Maryland Institute College of Art, the Walters Art Gallery and the Waxter Center.Her works have been exhibited at City Hall, the Lowe House Office Building in Annapolis and the Eubie Blake Cultural Center, where a statue she did of a Nigerian princess was featured in an exhibit.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 2, 1992
After losing members, friends and family to cancer, two related organizations pooled their efforts to raise $25,000 for a cold laboratory at the University of Maryland Cancer Center in Baltimore.The Knights of Pythias and its sister organization, Pythian Sisters, raised the money through the 2,100 members from chapters throughout the state.Carroll County played a key role this year. Four of the leaders in the statewide campaign are members of the Westminster lodge and temple.In the past, the men's and women's groups would raise money separately for projects.
NEWS
November 10, 1991
Esther Seabold, Retired nurseServices for Esther J. Seabold, a former nurse and longtime Baltimore resident, will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at the Sterling Ashton Funeral Home, 736 Edmondson Ave. in Catonsville.Mrs. Seabold, who was 79, died Friday of a heart attack at her home in the Guilford section of Baltimore.Born in Boston, she was a graduate of the Boston Children's Hospital Nursing School in 1933. She worked as a registered nurse at the hospital before moving to Baltimore in 1936.
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