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NEWS
November 20, 1990
The United Way of Central Maryland recently reported 1990 campaign contributions to date of $20.5 million. In doing so, it encouraged companies not yet completing their employee fund-raising drives to continue their efforts until the end of January.Nearly 34 percent of the 3,500 companies with employee campaigns have reported their results.Henry A. Rosenburg Jr., chairman of the 1990 United Way of Central Maryland campaign, said contributions to date represent a 12 percent increase in employee giving and a 5 percent jump in corporate gifts.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Helping manufacturers in Maryland, where the sector has changed - and shrunk - dramatically in the last generation, takes a certain type of person. Like Brian Sweeney, an engineer and attorney who grew up in a factory. Sweeney is executive director of the Maryland Manufacturing Extension Partnership. The Columbia nonprofit works with small and medium-sized makers of goods in the state to identify problems and opportunities and is among the groups that launched a Make it in Maryland campaign last week.
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FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | July 28, 1993
Commercial TV stations in Maryland and Washington barely get a passing grade when it comes to children's programming, according to a "report card" released yesterday by the Maryland Campaign for Kids' TV. The 13 monitored TV stations received an overall grade of D+."The stations in Maryland aren't doing a very good job," said campaign director Charlene Hughins Uhl. "Most of the stations had virtually nothing of quality for children on the air."The Maryland Campaign for Kids' TV is a project of two statewide organizations, Advocates for Children & Youth and Ready At Five, in association with a Washington-based national organization, the Center for Media Education.
BUSINESS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
Two Democratic lawmakers are pushing a plan to increase Maryland's minimum wage to $10 an hour, one of the highest rates in the country. Huddled in Tuesday's sub-freezing temperatures, the lawmakers and about 40 demonstrators holding "hard work deserves fair pay" signs contended that the current $7.25 hourly minimum wage is not enough for full-time workers to support themselves. Sen. Majority Leader Robert J. Garagiola, a Montgomery County Democrat, said the increase would be phased in by 2015.
NEWS
May 20, 2005
The Civil War was only a year old in 1861 when a group of Maryland soldiers and Southern sympathizers decided they wanted to fight as a group against the Union, so they established their own cavalry regiment across the Potomac River in Virginia. In May 1862, 18 Marylanders who had previously served in the First Virginia Cavalry, including Frank A. Bond of Anne Arundel County, gathered in Richmond for this reason. The Maryland men organized Company A, which eventually became the nucleus of a distinguished cavalry command in the Confederate Army.
NEWS
August 4, 1993
For adult television viewers, commercials are an interruption in regular programming, a time to break away for a trip to the refrigerator or an invitation to channel surf. For children, a commercial is part of the show. Studies indicate children under 7 pay as much attention to commercials as regular programming. Few kids understand the purpose of a commercial; they don't watch TV with the critical eye of older viewers.Helping children become critics of what they see on the small screen is a goal of the Maryland Campaign for Kids' TV, which released its first "report card" on local TV. "Report Card '93" is the work of community teams, each of which adopted a station in order to monitor the quality, quantity, timing and variety of its programming for children.
NEWS
July 28, 1993
It took a decade of lobbying by child advocacy groups to win passage of a law addressing the dismal state of television programming for children. It may well take another decade to ensure that stations comply with the law. The first "report card" for commercial stations serving Maryland viewers has bad news -- and good.The bad news is that commercial stations in the area so far have been "seriously deficient" in their efforts to comply with the law, earning only a D+. But the good news for Marylanders is the grass-roots interest that produced the report.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2000
Doro Bush Koch, sister of Republican presidential nominee George W. Bush and a Maryland resident, urged hundreds of GOP activists in Towson yesterday to do whatever is needed to elect her brother in November. The featured speaker at the opening of Bush's Maryland headquarters, Koch said the differences between the two presidential candidates this year on issues such as tax cuts are stark. "My brother believes everyone who pays taxes should get a tax cut," Koch said. "Al Gore believes that only people who fit certain criteria should get a tax cut. That's a big difference."
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff Reporters Melody Simmons and William Thompson contributed to this story | September 5, 1991
Flag-waving students greeted Barbara Bush at Worthington Elementary School in Ellicott City today as the First Lady joined ,, other federal officials in launching the "Maryland 2000" education campaign.Top federal officials went to other schools in Baltimore and Greenbelt as part of the day's events. The Maryland campaign is based on the goal-setting "America 2000" campaign that the Bush administration announced in April to guide school reform nationwide through the year 2000.The Maryland campaign would encourage community involvement in school reforms outlined in the state's "Schools for Success" program, which began last year.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | October 1, 1992
WHEN Gov. Bill Clinton was campaigning in Maryland early last month, the Democratic presidential nominee placed two phone calls to Gov. William Donald Schaefer. The calls were never accepted or returned.When Mr. Schaefer sponsored a fundraiser for the Maryland Democratic Party's coordinated campaign last week, he addressed the importance of electing a strong congressional TC delegation he can work with, but he never mentioned Mr. Clinton or Al Gore.And at a recent news conference, Mr. Schaefer declined to express a preference for president except to say that H. Ross Perot ought to go fly a kite (or whatever Texas billionaires do)
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
The number of Maryland teenagers who smoke cigarettes dropped significantly in the past decade, but state health officials say new statistics show that more young people are now getting hooked on candy-flavored cigars instead. In response, the state announced Thursday that it is launching a marketing campaign aimed at curbing the problem and trying to prevent the unraveling of years of work to stop teens from smoking. "It jeopardizes all of the gains in Maryland we have made in terms of tobacco use, and we cannot let that happen," said Dr. Donald Shell, interim director of the state Center for Health Promotion & Education.
NEWS
February 16, 2011
Efforts to bring some modest reform to Maryland's loophole-ridden campaign finance laws got a boost this week from Gov. Martin O'Malley. But the top Democrat's newfound interest in closing one of the more glaring deficiencies in state law is tempered by his desire to simultaneously loosen overall limits on political giving. As Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's recent task force reported, there are at least two dozen or more holes to plug in Maryland campaign finance law. Mr. O'Malley has thrown his support to closing exactly one — the ability of developers and others to use limited liability corporations (LLCs)
NEWS
January 6, 2011
For all the attention paid to the high-profile public corruption scandals of the past year, from Baltimore to Upper Marlboro, one might assume that state lawmakers would be eager to institute some reforms when they convene for their annual 90-day session next week — if only to demonstrate to voters that they've been paying attention. If so, Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has certainly handed them a road map — albeit a somewhat blurry one — on 25 ways they might plug some holes in campaign finance law. The 118-page report presented this week by Mr. Gansler's advisory committee does a commendable job of outlining the problems but leaves most of the specific solutions to members of the legislature.
NEWS
November 10, 2010
In law, there are loopholes — ambiguities that allow circumvention of rules — and there are outrageous loopholes that virtually nullify legal requirements. Maryland's campaign finance law has much of the former and is quickly approaching the latter. Let's say, for instance, you are a fabulously wealthy businessman and wish to give a candidate for governor a lot more than the $4,000 to which you are restricted by law. No problem. There are any number of ways to circumvent the limit.
NEWS
May 20, 2005
The Civil War was only a year old in 1861 when a group of Maryland soldiers and Southern sympathizers decided they wanted to fight as a group against the Union, so they established their own cavalry regiment across the Potomac River in Virginia. In May 1862, 18 Marylanders who had previously served in the First Virginia Cavalry, including Frank A. Bond of Anne Arundel County, gathered in Richmond for this reason. The Maryland men organized Company A, which eventually became the nucleus of a distinguished cavalry command in the Confederate Army.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2004
Six months ago, Robin Pickering, a technical writer in Catonsville, was hardly a political mover and shaker. But now she moves more Marylanders in the name of politics than just about anyone else. A spark of curiosity in the spring about how she might be able to help John Kerry's presidential campaign has ballooned unpredictably into Pickering's arranging for hundreds of Marylanders to cross state borders every weekend to campaign in neighboring battleground states such as Pennsylvania and West Virginia.
NEWS
By John Frece and John Frece,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
BOSTON -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer boasted to fellow governors yesterday that Maryland is one of only two states in the nation where births to single teen-agers have gone down over the past six years.Mr. Schaefer, attending the annual summer meeting of the National Governors' Association here, credited the reduction to a $4 million public and private program known for its catchy television, poster and billboard ads promoting sexual abstinence and paternal responsibility.Probably best known is the ad that features a chicken in basketball shoes, followed by the question: "What do you call a guy who makes a baby and flies the coop?"
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Helping manufacturers in Maryland, where the sector has changed - and shrunk - dramatically in the last generation, takes a certain type of person. Like Brian Sweeney, an engineer and attorney who grew up in a factory. Sweeney is executive director of the Maryland Manufacturing Extension Partnership. The Columbia nonprofit works with small and medium-sized makers of goods in the state to identify problems and opportunities and is among the groups that launched a Make it in Maryland campaign last week.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
An unspectacular presidential primary race in Maryland is taking on the look of a battle only now, as the John Kerry and John Edwards campaigns burn up phone lines, leaflet churches and street corners, and organize last-minute rallies in hopes of propelling voters to the polls Tuesday. Kerry is scheduled to make his first campaign stop in Maryland tomorrow, with a speech at Morgan State University. Elizabeth Edwards swept through the state yesterday, meeting with her husband's supporters at three house parties and an Annapolis restaurant.
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