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NEWS
February 26, 1995
If Maryland is to shed its reputation as a state with a less-than-positive business climate, it will be up to the Economic Development Commission named last week to turn things around.This group of 21 business leaders has its share of corporate home-run hitters -- such as RTKL's Harold Adams, Mercantile Bank's H. Furlong Baldwin, Bell Atlantic's Fred D'Alessio and McCormick's H. Eugene Blattman -- who gave the group an early boost by accepting a state incentive package to build a $20 million spice distribution center in Harford County instead of Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
By Stephen Schaff | August 4, 2014
The new Waters of the U.S. rule is designed to clarify that the Clean Water Act protects a variety of important waters, including seasonal and rain-dependent streams, as well as wetlands near rivers and streams. Getting it implemented will depend on support from our members of Congress for the agencies' proposal. It'll affect a lot more than your favorite crab cakes - it could save your job. Think clean water only counts when it comes out of your tap or when you dive in at the beach?
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BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Not a lot has changed in the jockey goggle business since 1947, when Israel Kroop first stitched trim around a molded sheet of plastic, added two brass vents from a mattress, and attached a strip of elastic. Kroop's design — a made-in-Maryland variation on miners' protective eyewear — was an instant hit with jockeys at the Laurel racetrack and at Pimlico. It didn't take long for the invention to catch on outside Maryland. Riders around the country swapped cumbersome motorcycle goggles for the wafer-thin, well-ventilated models.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Vowing to strengthen Maryland's middle class, Gov. Martin O'Malley signed legislation Monday that will gradually raise the state's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour — his No. 1 legislative priority for the last of his eight years in office. The measure was among more than 200 bills the governor signed into law at a State House ceremony. Others included a ban on the sale of most grain alcohol, reforms to Baltimore's liquor board and expansion of the city's needle-exchange program to prevent AIDS.
NEWS
By Stephen Schaff | August 4, 2014
The new Waters of the U.S. rule is designed to clarify that the Clean Water Act protects a variety of important waters, including seasonal and rain-dependent streams, as well as wetlands near rivers and streams. Getting it implemented will depend on support from our members of Congress for the agencies' proposal. It'll affect a lot more than your favorite crab cakes - it could save your job. Think clean water only counts when it comes out of your tap or when you dive in at the beach?
BUSINESS
September 29, 1995
If you want to do business with the state government, it will help to have a Maryland address and employ Maryland residents.Acknowledging Gov. Parris N. Glendening's desire to steer more state contracts to resident companies, the state Board of Public Works has adopted a formal definition of what constitutes a resident Maryland business.It's "a business enterprise that has a Maryland address, is registered to do business in the state of Maryland, employs Maryland residents and regularly conducts business within the state."
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Kim Clark and Ian Johnson and Kim Clark,Staff Writers Staff Writer Jon Morgan, Mark Hyman and Ted Shelsby contributed to this article | August 11, 1993
From the worlds of banking and publishing to crab cooking and trucking, Maryland business leaders are trying to figure out what President Clinton's new budget package means to them and their companies.The plan, signed into law yesterday, was designed to slow the growth of the federal debt by $496 billion over the next five years. The bill's narrow passage was considered a crucial test of the new administration.But many of the 19 chief executives surveyed by The Sun criticized the plan, saying its higher taxes could stifle the economic recovery and slow their companies' planned expansions.
NEWS
August 15, 1994
"Maryland is 50th out of 60 U.S. markets with pro-business attitudes.""Maryland is America's #1 most litigious state in auto accident suits.""Maryland leads the nation in jobs lost."That's how a North Carolina business political action committee summed up our state's performance in recent years. It was the N.C. PAC's way of warning members what can happen if they don't move heaven and earth to ensure a pro-business climate among elected officials."Why did companies leave Maryland?" the solicitation letter asked.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | January 25, 2004
HOW'S the business climate in Maryland? Temperate temperatures, light breezes and 50 percent humidity as far as eyes can see, according to business practitioners. The latest and last edition of the Maryland Business Climate Survey compiled by the University of Baltimore showed not only gains in hiring and revenue (the business "weather") but also broad optimism about ambient commercial conditions. For almost a decade the university has asked executives whether Maryland is pro-business or anti-business or somewhere in between.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2003
Neoterik Health Technologies Inc., a Frederick County maker of respirators and gas masks, had 15 employees at this time last year. But as fears of terrorism and biological warfare grew, the company added 25 employees and its annual sales soared past $3 million. "We're adding to Frederick County in an area that doesn't have a lot of employment opportunities," said Jo Vaughn, human resources and financial manager at Neoterik, which is looking to hire another 25 employees this year. "Because of our work force doubling and because we want to attract people here, we've started offering health insurance to our employees.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
I read the article on the front page of Maryland Business section about the planned CineBistro at the Rotunda ( "Moviegoing adds luxury," April 1). Imagine the traffic on 41st Street that a seven-screen multiplex would bring! The dinner and a movie concept? The sounds of dishes clinking, forks stabbing, the melange of fragrances from the "chef inspired" menu assaulting the moviegoer's senses - and cocktails, a great idea for keeping the chit chat down during a screening. Leather chairs and swing away tables?
NEWS
By Mark Newgent | February 21, 2014
Over the years Red Maryland has chronicled how the Democratic majority in Annapolis has been in the business of picking winner and losers in Maryland's economy.  Whether it is bestowing lavish subsidies for film production, mandating ratepayers foot the bill for offshore wind farms, or sole bidding the state's speed camera program to a politically connected vendor, Maryland Democrats have mastered the art of rewarding their friends.  ...
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 11, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown will stand in for Gov. Martin O'Malley in making the administration's case to a House committee Tuesday for raising Maryland's minimum wage. O'Malley had been scheduled to testify before the House Economic Matters Committee , in one of his last appearances before the General Assembly.  But he will instead attend the funeral of Baltimore construction magnate and philanthropist Willard Hackerman , who died Monday at age 95. The House panel will hear from a bevy of supporters and opponents of increasing the state's lowest hourly pay rate in stages to $10.10 an hour by 2016.
BUSINESS
By Nicholas Fouriezos and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
While the Baltimore Ravens and the Buffalo Bills prepare for their Sunday matchup, the two franchises don't seem to have much in common. Buffalo has gone through six general managers since 2000 and hasn't made the playoffs during that time. Meanwhile, Baltimore has been the model of consistency, with nine playoff appearances and two Super Bowl championships. The two cities do share one unflattering trait, though. Baltimore and Buffalo rank as the only metropolitan areas with a National Football League franchise that don't also have a Fortune 500 company within their boundaries, according to a release from Maryland Business for Responsive Government.
NEWS
By Katie V. Jones, For The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Ten years after starting his business, C.R. Dynamics and Associates, Charles Ramos began to wonder if it was ever going to work. He was confident in his business plan and strategy, but it was taking a lot longer than he hoped to get his marketing and sales-support business off the ground. "I didn't think it would be as difficult as it was the first 10 years," said Ramos, a Columbia resident. "We were most tested in the fourth and fifth years," he said. "I didn't think I could do this any more - and then things happened.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
The O'Malley administration's aggressive new plan to fight climate change calls for Maryland residents to further cut their energy use or face higher monthly utility bills. The plan, to be released Thursday by Gov. Martin O'Malley, also requires that more of the state's electricity come from renewable sources by 2020. Maryland's goals for reducing greenhouse gases are among the most ambitious in the nation. The plan requires stricter measures than previously proposed to meet the requirement set by the General Assembly in 2009 to cut carbon emissions that scientists say drive climate change.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2011
Maryland Business for Responsive Government, a state business advocacy group with a bipartisan mission and hundreds of members, on Tuesday named an Annapolis lobbyist with nearly 20 years' experience to be its new president. Kimberly M. Burns, an attorney and lobbyist with Government Affairs Maryland, her father's firm, replaces Robert O.C. "Rocky" Worcester, who had led the group since its formation in 1983. "It's a broad-based opportunity to utilize my skills for something I strongly believe in and I'm very passionate about," said Burns.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | November 14, 2006
Timothy O'Donovan Evans, a linguist and former coordinator of the Maryland Business Center China, died of cancer Wednesday at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington. The former Ruxton resident was 38. Mr. Evans was born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton. He was a 1986 graduate of Loyola High School, where his fluency in Spanish, German and Portuguese earned him the school's top language award. "Even though he had an amazing memory and a natural gift for languages and politics, he still managed to watch a lot of terrible TV shows when we were in high school," said Steven R. Porter, a friend since seventh grade.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Maryland institutions have increased their lending to small business under a federal program by nearly $337.7 million since the low point of the recession, the U.S. Department of the Treasury announced Tuesday. Nationally, banks raised their lending through the Small Business Lending Fund by $9 billion since the recession, the department said. The Treasury's initial survey of the program estimated that 38,000 additional loans have been made as of the end of last year. The program provides capital to institutions that, in turn, see the interest or dividends they pay for those funds reduced the more they lend to small businesses.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Technology company Hope LoanPort could have signed a conventional lease for its new headquarters in Baltimore. But the nonprofit doesn't work in a conventional way. Its 10 employees live in three states. Some work at home part-time but need office space to meet with clients or review documents. Sometimes a few employees need to meet in an office to work on a presentation. And the company's growth makes it difficult to gauge when it will need more space or how much more. Hope chose a relatively new but growing option, a "flexible workplace" center.
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