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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | June 27, 1993
The Pocomoke River on the Lower Eastern Shore recently was stocked with more than 10,000 largemouth bass fingerlings tagged by the state Department of Natural Resources as part of an effort to develop programs for enhancing and preserving that portion of the tidal sport fishery.The fingerlings, hatched at the Manning Hatchery in Charles County and released from Sturgis Park in Snow Hill, will help DNR biologists determine how bass interact with their environment and study growth rates.The Just-a-Mere Bass Club of Snow Hill assisted in the release of the fingerlings, and by 1996 biologists expect the fingerlings to have grown to the legal minimum size of a foot.
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SPORTS
August 27, 2013
Colton Lambert, 12, caught a Maryland-record largemouth bass while fishing at a farm pond in his hometown of Huntingtown on July 31. The fish weighed 11 pounds, 6 ounces and was 26 inches long and 18 inches around. Lambert caught the fish using a spinning rod loaded with an 8-pound test line and a plastic worm, rigged weedless and without a weight. Fisheries biologist Keith Lockwood verified that proper procedures were followed and identified the fish as the freshwater largemouth bass state record.
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NEWS
By Gary Diamond and Gary Diamond,Contributing writer | May 3, 1992
Leo "Buck" Doran didn't win a dime when he took top honors in last weekend's Mr. BASS Tournament.But he dreams of eventually hitting the jackpot because of that feat.The annual event, which took place on the tidal Potomac River near Washington, drew bass fishermen from across Maryland. It was sponsored by the Maryland BASS Federation.Doran won the two-day tournament by catching a total combined weight of nearly 38 pounds of fish.Had he been fishing the prestigious BASS Master's Classic, held last year at Gunpowder State Park, he would now be among an elite group of millionaire bass fishermen.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - The "Bass Boss" is back at the event he founded, and now he's looking to return to television with a new weekly show. Ray Scott hopes to find a network - perhaps ESPN or Outdoor Life - to air Eagles of Angling, a bass competition that permits only 4-pound test and doesn't allow anglers to use nets to boat their fish. The 13-week show would pit two teams of two anglers against each other for a day of fishing, with the winner moving on to the next round. "I'm more convinced of this concept than I was when I started BASS," said Scott, who founded BASS in 1968 and sold it to his deputy and an Alabama investment firm in 1986.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - The "Bass Boss" is back at the event he founded, and now he's looking to return to television with a new weekly show. Ray Scott hopes to find a network - perhaps ESPN or Outdoor Life - to air Eagles of Angling, a bass competition that permits only 4-pound test and doesn't allow anglers to use nets to boat their fish. The 13-week show would pit two teams of two anglers against each other for a day of fishing, with the winner moving on to the next round. "I'm more convinced of this concept than I was when I started BASS," said Scott, who founded BASS in 1968 and sold it to his deputy and an Alabama investment firm in 1986.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
The Potomac River, to this point, seems to have escaped the recent diesel-fuel spill on Sugarland Run with minimal damage to its fish and wildlife, according to Ken Penrod, a bass guide and conservation chairman for the Maryland B.A.S.S. Federation.Penrod, who spends virtually every day between late March anNovember on the Potomac guiding bass fishing parties orparticipating in volunteer work with state and federal fisheries groups, said that by Thursday there was little remaining evidence of the spill below Little Falls near Washington.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | March 8, 1992
Officials of the Maryland B.A.S.S. Federation and the American Bass Association have formed a coalition they hope will be able to assist in solving the problems of boat fishermen at Prettyboy, Liberty and Loch Raven reservoirs.Prettyboy and Liberty reservoirs have been closed to boat fishing since the season opened March 1. Loch Raven Reservoir, which is scheduled to open on April 3, might allow only rental boats from its fishing center.The Baltimore City Department of Public Works, which controls the fishing permits boaters must have in order to fish the reservoirs, recently decided not to issue permits this year until it can find a way to ensure the reservoirs will not be infested with zebra mussels.
SPORTS
August 22, 1993
SHOWSThrough Sept. 26: Chesapeake Changes, a natural history exhibit that focuses on the geology, geography, wildlife and human settlement in the 64,000-square mile watershed of the bay, Explorers Hall of the National Geographic Society, 17 and M streets NW, Washington.Sept. 4, 5 and 6: Southern Maryland Wildlife Festival to benefit the Ruffed Grouse Society and Maryland Quail Unlimited, The Pavilion, Indian Head. Auctions, sporting clays competitions and crab feasts. Festival opens at 10 a.m. each day. Call (301)
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | February 24, 1991
The Maryland Saltwater Sportsfishermen's Association is organizing a march in Annapolis on March 11 to show support for Senate Bill 575, which is an effort to have the rockfish declared a game fish and thereby eliminate commercial catches or sales of the state fish.SB 575, which is sponsored by Sen. Mike Collins, is the second effort by the MSSA to get such a bill through the General Assembly.SB 575 is an interesting proposition in several ways, and what comes to mind first is that it shows a beginning of political organization by groups of recreational fishermen with different interests -- the birth, perhaps, of what could become a voting bloc with considerable clout.
SPORTS
April 25, 1993
SHOWSThrough Sept. 26: Opening of Chesapeake Changes, a natural history exhibit that focuses on the geology, geography, wildlife and human settlement in the 64,000 square-mile watershed of the bay, Explorers Hall of the National Geographic Society, 17 and M Streets NW, Washington, D.C.May 7, 8, 9: Havre de Grace Decoy Festival, Havre de Grace Middle School and High School. Show opens at 6 p.m. Friday and at 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is $5 daily or $8 for three-day pass. Children under 12 will be admitted free.
SPORTS
September 5, 1993
SHOWSThrough Sept. 26: Chesapeake Changes, a natural history exhibit that focuses on the geology, geography, wildlife and human settlement in the 64,000 square mile watershed of the bay, Explorers Hall of the National Geographic Society, 17th and streets NW, Washington, D.C.Sept. 11-12: Gun and Knife Show sponsored by the Camrod Hunting Club, Agriculture Center, Westminster, 9 a.m. each day. 250 trade tables. Admission is $4 with children under 12 admitted free when accompanied by an adult.
SPORTS
July 11, 1993
SHOWSThrough Sept. 26: Chesapeake Changes, a natural history exhibit that focuses on the geology, geography, wildlife and human settlement in the 64,000 square mile watershed of the bay, Explorers Hall of the National Geographic Society, 17 and M streets NW, Washington.FISHINGTomorrow: Monthly meeting of the Pasadena Sportfishing Club, Orchard Beach Firehall on Solley Road, 7:30 p.m.Thursday-Sunday : Ocean City Tuna Tournament, Ocean City Fishing Center. For more information, call (410) 213-1121 or (1-800)
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | June 27, 1993
The Pocomoke River on the Lower Eastern Shore recently was stocked with more than 10,000 largemouth bass fingerlings tagged by the state Department of Natural Resources as part of an effort to develop programs for enhancing and preserving that portion of the tidal sport fishery.The fingerlings, hatched at the Manning Hatchery in Charles County and released from Sturgis Park in Snow Hill, will help DNR biologists determine how bass interact with their environment and study growth rates.The Just-a-Mere Bass Club of Snow Hill assisted in the release of the fingerlings, and by 1996 biologists expect the fingerlings to have grown to the legal minimum size of a foot.
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