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By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2005
The aviation executive who led the Salt Lake City airport through post-Sept. 11 security upgrades and preparations for the 2002 Winter Olympics will take over Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport next month, Maryland officials announced yesterday. Timothy L. Campbell, 58, will replace Paul J. Wiedefeld, a well-regarded administrator who chose to return to the international engineering management and consulting firm where he worked before being tapped to head BWI and other state-owned airports about 3 1/2 years ago. He will come to BWI near the conclusion of a $1.8 billion expansion there, including a new terminal for Southwest Airlines, the airport's biggest carrier.
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FEATURES
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Two snowy owls have been trapped at Martin State Airport in Baltimore County and will be relocated away from the airport, aviation officials said Friday. A female owl was captured in a trap at the airport shortly after sunset on Thursday and a male owl was captured Friday morning, according to the Maryland Aviation Administration. The owls were captured in traps that the Maryland Aviation Administration and U.S. Department of Agriculture had placed on a grassy area on the north side of the airport.
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NEWS
February 23, 2004
Black History Month event scheduled for Thursday at BWI The Maryland Aviation Administration will hold a Black History Month event at 10 a.m. Thursday in the observation gallery of Baltimore-Washington International Airport. Featured will be two pilots from Southwest Airlines. The event is free and open to the public. Information or to reserve a seat: 410-859-7229. Aeronautics institute to hold dinner meeting The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics will be host for a dinner meeting Thursday at the Maryland Aviation Administration.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Gregory Lawrence said Monday he plans to appeal the Maryland Aviation Administration's decision last week to terminate him from his job as BWI Airport's acting fire chief. Lawrence, the first African-American to lead the airport fire department, initially got his job there after complaining about racial discrimination. He feels his termination may be retaliation for that lawsuit he brought against the department more than a decade ago. "I want my job back," he said during a news conference in the Annapolis offices of his attorney, Alan Legum, where he was flanked by more than a dozen African-American leaders and fire officials from around the region.
NEWS
March 27, 2000
Radio show highlights BWI job opportunities The variety and diversity of employment opportunities at Baltimore-Washington International Airport will be showcased on today's live broadcast of the Rouse and Company show on WQSR-FM 105.7. The show will be aired from 5: 30 a.m. to 10 a.m. from the airport's Observation Gallery. As radio personality Steve Rouse weathers his "mid-life crisis" and looks for a new career, he'll interview representatives from, among others, Southwest Airlines, British Airways, the USO, Maryland Aviation Administration and U.S. Customs.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
Food and retail workers at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport protested working conditions on Wednesday and attempted to deliver a proposed "Bill of Rights," to AirMall USA, BWI's concessions manager. Unite Here, a labor union that represents hospitality workers in Baltimore and elsewhere and is working to organize the airport concessions workers, said the private management company has benefited from higher passenger traffic while workers struggle with low wages and lack of health care access.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Massive girders and freshly poured concrete form a bump in the middle of the low-slung terminal, almost as if BWI Marshall Airport is expecting. In a way, it is. Before next summer, a glassed-in walkway, new shops and a modern security checkpoint will spring from the framework. Passengers will be able to get from the concourses used by Southwest and AirTran to the one used by American and Spirit without leaving security. By the time summer is out, the oldest part of BWI will be modernized and directly connected to the busiest part.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
Travelers passing through Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will see extensive changes over the next two years as officials launch a $100 million renovation project that will transform the central section of the airport — including parts that date to its opening in 1950. The project, set to begin next year and to be finished in summer 2013, will allow passengers to move among concourses A, B and C without having to pass through security a second time. It will also replace a narrow checkpoint with a much larger one, which is expected to help relieve congestion during busy travel periods.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport posted its best month ever in terms of passenger count in July, with 2.2 million fliers landing at or taking off from the airport, the Maryland Aviation Administration said Tuesday. The total represented a 1.6 percent increase over July 2010, the top previous month for BWI passengers. The new record did not come as a surprise. The airport has been enjoying steady growth in recent years, posting monthly passenger records in 14 of the past 15 months.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2010
Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport had the busiest October in its history, continuing a six-month string of setting records for passenger traffic, the Maryland Aviation Administration said Monday. Almost 2 million passengers — 1,994,905 — passed through BWI during the month, a 7.2 percent increase over October a year ago. BWI Marshall has recorded year-to-year increases in traffic for 16 of the past 17 months. The only month that failed to show growth was February, when two snowstorms closed the airport.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2010
Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport set a record for June traffic this year as 2,085,293 commercial passengers passed through the airport that month, according to the Maryland Aviation Administration. That total represents an 8.9 percent increase over June 2009. It was the second-busiest month ever at BWI, falling just short of the record set in August 2001 — the month before 9/11 sent the airline industry into a prolonged slump. More than half of BWI's June passengers — 1,111,896 — flew on Southwest Airlines, which tallied a 14.9 percent increase over the previous year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
Jeanette D. Wessel, a former Maryland Aviation Administration official who had been active for years in the state Republican Party, died April 15 of cancer at her home in Estero, Fla. The former Annapolis resident was 67. Jeanette Driver, the daughter of a livestockman and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Marriottsville. She was a graduate of Howard High School. During the late 1960s and 1970s, she worked for the Catonsville accounting firm of Davis and Davis.
NEWS
January 12, 2010
Warm bread and pastries. Open bar. Extra-wide seats. Use of a private lounge at London Heathrow Airport with a complimentary glass of champagne. These are the perks available to those fortunate enough to fly business class on British Airways. Just ask senior officials at the Maryland Aviation Administration. Between 2005 and 2008, aviation administration executives flew British Airways business class 67 times, chiefly to attend business meetings with British Airways officials. According to a recent legislative audit, that cost the state $543,000 and violated Maryland regulations for foreign travel.
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