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Dan Rodricks | June 10, 2014
When you think about it, name recognition in business and politics is really a double-edged sword. If the name is golden, or even brass-plated, it can open doors and take you places. But a widely recognized name can also cause people to question you harder - or in a different way - than they might a newcomer. They might even hold your name against you. Take Jon Cardin in the campaign for Maryland attorney general. With Maryland's primary election just two weeks from now, he's enjoying a fat lead in the latest Baltimore Sun poll over his Democratic primary opponents, Brian Frosh and Aisha Braveboy.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Republican Larry Hogan urged state and federal investigators Thursday to probe the possible connection between large political donations to the Democratic Governors Association and the award of Maryland state contracts to donors. Hogan, the GOP nominee for governor, also called on federal investigators to widen their audit of Maryland's health exchange to examine whether state tax dollars were misspent on the faulty online insurance marketplace. He convened a news conference Thursday to allege what he called a pattern of "suspicious" donations and suggest that his opponent, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, might be the beneficiary.
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NEWS
June 11, 2014
A strong public school system is important, and I support politicians who believe and vote that way. That's why I am glad The Sun endorsed state Sen. Brian Frosh for Maryland attorney general ( "Frosh for attorney general," June 8). Senator Frosh went to Maryland public schools, as do his children. Throughout his 27-year legislative career, support for public education in Maryland has been one of his top priorities. Specifically, he worked to reduce tuition costs at Maryland's public colleges and universities.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Custom sports uniform provider Sports55 Inc. has reached a settlement with the state over allegations that it failed to fulfill youth team uniform orders or delivered them late, the Maryland Attorney General's office said. The state Consumer Protection Division reached the settlement with Sports55 and affiliated enterprises Teamuniforms123 LLC and Dyesubsports LLC, all based in Anne Arundel County, and two owners, Kelly Burke and John Eberl, the Attorney General's office said. "Dozens of adult and youth league teams were left in the lurch when this company failed to promptly deliver the uniforms they ordered and paid for," Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said in a statement.
NEWS
October 20, 2006
Today, The Sun continues its endorsements for the Nov. 7 general election with races for Maryland attorney general and state's attorneys in Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties. With a staff of 500 and duties that range from providing legal counsel to state agencies to arguing criminal appeals, Maryland's attorney general should have a broad range of legal expertise and a proven administrative record. Douglas F. Gansler, who has served two terms as Montgomery County state's attorney and six years as an assistant U.S. attorney, fits the bill.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the Sun | May 27, 2007
"How many of you guys know more about computers than your parents?" Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler asked a gathering of fourth-graders at Waverly Elementary School in Ellicott City. Nearly every hand shot up. Gansler, whose children are 10 and 12, sees firsthand that youngsters today spend a lot of time on computers. But the Internet, he said, is like Halloween - a lot of fun, but also a little scary. At Waverly, he introduced a statewide program intended to educate children about potential online dangers, including sexual predators and identity theft.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
The Maryland attorney general's office argued in a lengthy legal brief, filed in the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, that a convicted child rapist serving four life terms should not be offered a second chance to take a plea deal years after the fact, despite a U.S. district court ruling demanding just that. "The district court erred," Assistant Attorney General Edward Kelley wrote in the 56-page document. He was referring to a finding that the constitutional rights of John Joseph Merzbacher, an English teacher at the South Baltimore Catholic Community middle school in the 1970s, were violated because his attorneys failed to inform him of a plea deal before his 1995 trial on child rape and sexual abuse charges.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Maryland's attorney general said Friday that the nearly $60 million from the national mortgage settlement that the state controls would be used to help people "victimized by the egregious conduct of the banks," in contrast with some states that intend to use their shares to plug budget holes. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler also said his office is pursuing criminal investigations related to mortgage and foreclosure fraud, though he didn't say whether cases related to the "robo-signing" that prompted the settlement might be filed.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2001
Fortified with takeout coffee and doughnuts, J. Joseph Curran Jr. dialed a 7 a.m. conference call from his home to help decide the course of the nation's biggest antitrust case in a generation. Some states, particularly Massachusetts, had already made known their distaste for the Justice Department's proposed settlement with Microsoft Corp., the software company found to have intimidated customers and competitors to build a monopoly in the personal computer market. But Curran, the Maryland attorney general, and several fellow state prosecutors felt the walls closing in on them: The clout of the federal government was gone, the uncertainty of gaining anything more by continuing to fight for two years or more was great and the judge in the case wanted a decision that morning or planned to resume the trial in March.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
National Rifle Association President David Keene said Tuesday that the organization intends to challenge the constitutionality of Maryland's newly passed gun law, as a conservative group readied plans to try to overturn the law through voter referendum. Keene said during a radio interview the group will “absolutely” go to the courts. “We are already in court in New York and we will be in court and aiding those in Maryland - and I am myself a Maryland resident - who want to challenge the constitutionality of this and other provisions here in Maryland,” Keene said to the Washington, D.C., station WTOP.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley has imposed strict new rules to limit when the state may hold immigrants in Baltimore's jail at the request of federal authorities, dealing a new blow to a national program intended to catch people who are in the country illegally. The governor's policy, which was made public Friday by immigration advocates, comes in response to a recent opinion from the Maryland attorney general's office, which found that detaining immigrants in local jails beyond their scheduled release without probable cause is likely a violation of the Fourth Amendment.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Ask.fm, the anonymous question and answer-based social network linked to several teenage suicides, agreed to revamp its safety procedures in a deal brokered between the site and the Maryland Attorney General's Office. The agreement is similar to one recently struck between Ask.fm and the New York Attorney General's Office. Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler announced the site, owned by Ask.com, will remove repeat abusive posters, monitor user-generated misuse and harassment reports and open new positions for a safety liaison and a law enforcement liaison.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
In a reversal of state healthcare policy, transgender state employees in Maryland can now access gender reassignment surgery, hormone therapy and other transition-related care under their state-provided health insurance plans. The change quietly went into effect at the start of this month as the result of legal negotiations in a discrimination case brought against the state by Sailor Holobaugh, a 31-year-old clinical research assistant in neurology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
In a recent letter, Joan Anderson expressed her concerns that Attorney General Douglas Gansler and his running mate would had been more understanding of senior issues than any other team running for governor ( "Who is the candidate for seniors?" July 5). She cited no specifics for her reasoning. The Maryland Attorney General's office has a department called the Health Education Advocacy Unit (HAU). The unit's primary charge is to address issues and circumstances encountered by the elderly.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
One-fourth of the names on Maryland's sex offender registry could be removed after the state's top court expanded Monday on an earlier ruling that adding offenders from before the list was created violated the state constitution. The Court of Appeals declared last year that the state could not require the registration of people who committed their crimes before October 1995, when the database was established. State officials removed the one name in question in that case but maintained that federal law required them to keep older cases in the database.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Brian E. Frosh, a veteran state senator from Montgomery County who championed gun control and environmental protection, defeated two opponents to win Tuesday's Democratic primary for Maryland attorney general. Frosh, 67, who had trailed in early polls but was better-funded than his rivals, held a commanding lead over Baltimore County Del. Jon. S. Cardin - the nephew of U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin - and state Del. Aisha N. Braveboy of Prince George's County. After a concession call from Cardin, Frosh addressed supporters at the quaint Women's Club of Chevy Chase.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
For Eddie Germino, being unemployed for a time last year worked to his advantage in a dispute with his Maryland landlord. Germino, 27, had moved out of the house where he had lived with other students. Now he was trying to get his security deposit back. "Since I had so much free time," he says, "I was able to do all the legal research and make all the calls and write all the letters. " And his efforts paid off. A court ordered the landlord earlier this year to pay Germino $2,700 — three times his original deposit.
NEWS
December 13, 1997
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun said the Maryland Attorney General's office took action against Continental Food for deceptive practices in its direct food sales to home consumers. That operation has no connection to restaurant food distributor Continental Food Service Inc.Pub Date: 12/13/97
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
Maryland's Democratic and Republican contenders for governor are sparing no effort to pull every last supporter to the polls Tuesday in a primary for which many voters aren't ready. Likely voters can expect a barrage of phone calls and a flood of election-eve mail on behalf of the three Democrats and four Republicans seeking Maryland's top office. Television ads will try to sway the undecided up to the bitter end — at least for campaigns that can afford that luxury — but the main focus will be on the ground game.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Out-of-state groups are pumping last-minute cash into the Maryland attorney general's race, fueling a barrage of campaign ads, including $240,000 in TV commercials purchased by a Florida-based fund that won't reveal its donors. The ads purchased by the Orlando-based Protecting Our Future Action Fund, which was formed Thursday, support Del. Jon S. Cardin of Baltimore County. State Sen. Brian E. Frosh of Montgomery County — considered Cardin's main opposition in Tuesday's Democratic primary — is also benefiting from outside spending.
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