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June 27, 1991
The Maryland Arts Council has presented 57 awards to Maryland artists in the areas of choreography, crafts, fiction, media, music composition, new genres, photography, playwrighting, poetry and visual arts.The 1991 Individual Artist Awards range from $2,500 to $6,000. Ten different juries representing the range of artistic disciplines reviewed 865 applications.The Individual Artist Awards recognize exceptional work and artistic excellence in each field, according to James Backas, executive director of Maryland State Arts Council.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2011
You knew they were tasty. But did you know crabs were art? At least they are in the hands of a few area painters. They take those hard, pointy, colorful outer shells, the ones that usually get rolled up in a newspaper and thrown away when the crab feast is over, and turn them into decorative keepsakes. "I really don't know what the draw is," concedes Dorothy Oliver, who paints on hollowed-out crustaceans from her home in Huntingtown in Calvert County. "It's a unique little item.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | April 9, 1992
Maryland artists, like artists everywhere, need all the exposure they can get, so it's good news that the Art Gallery of the University of Maryland at College Park has inaugurated a "Maryland State Artists Series" of exhibitions, the first of which is now on view with a second edition slated for the spring of 1994. The bad news is that this show isn't as good as one would have hoped. But that shouldn't be taken as discouraging the continuation of the series.The idea was to show emerging artists, and of 150 who applied six were chosen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
"I had been in the mire of nuts and bolts, working with lights, synthetic furs, outrageous materials," says artist Ryan Hackett. "I needed quiet. " Out of that quiet, the 34-year-old Prince George's County native created the works that earned him the 2010 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize, a $25,000 annual juried competition for visual artists from the Mid-Atlantic region. Last year, Hackett was named a Sondheim finalist for his striking collection of nature-themed installations — a fake fur-covered bench vibrating from a concealed subwoofer that imitated the heartbeat of a hibernating polar bear; a synthetic skull of a white Siberian tiger with headphones that allowed people to hear the animal's digitally transformed vocalizing; small shells attached to the wall, emitting a chorus of cicada sounds.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2001
Alton P. "Jim" Balder, a free-spirited artist, writer and outdoorsman who wrote several books, including a well-reviewed 1955 work about Maryland artists, died at his Roland Park home Friday after a long battle with heart disease. He was 77. A lifelong artist, Mr. Balder tried the more settled life of a businessman after returning from a stint in the Army Air Forces during World War II but found himself better suited to artistic pursuits -- from sculpture to furniture-making to painting -- as well as athletic and intellectual ones.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 1, 2002
Throughout the art world, the period from roughly the turn of the last century to the 1970s was a period of uncertainty and confusion, when traditional standards were being challenged and institutions were not always able to keep up with the rapid pace of developments - a situation, in short, not so different from that of today. Maryland artists, as a new exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of art demonstrates, were not immune to these upheavals. In response, they contributed a rich legacy to their state and region, adopting the lessons of modernism to describe the rapidly changing world around them and the daily life of its people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2011
You knew they were tasty. But did you know crabs were art? At least they are in the hands of a few area painters. They take those hard, pointy, colorful outer shells, the ones that usually get rolled up in a newspaper and thrown away when the crab feast is over, and turn them into decorative keepsakes. "I really don't know what the draw is," concedes Dorothy Oliver, who paints on hollowed-out crustaceans from her home in Huntingtown in Calvert County. "It's a unique little item.
FEATURES
September 14, 1990
The Baltimore Sun has announced an open call for original art with a Maryland holiday-seasonal theme.The winning design will be used for reproduction as the Baltimore Sun's 1990 holiday greeting card. The program was initiated last year to feature the works of Maryland artists. The art chosen will be purchased by the Baltimore Sun and added to its collection.The competition is open to all Maryland artists working in all media, styles and techniques. Selection will be made by a Baltimore Sun art committee and will be based on artistic merit and appropriateness for reproduction as a holiday card design.
NEWS
By Bennard Perlman | October 26, 1999
WELL into her second year on the job, Baltimore Museum of Art director Doreen Bolger is creating quite a buzz about her ambitious agenda for the museum, including a redesign of the museum's galleries.She has already broken with the past by restoring the original gilt frames to the Cone Collection's Impressionistic paintings -- a clear bow to local tastes.As Ms. Bolger moves forward, there are several other areas of local concern that I hope she considers:Open the BMA on Mondays. Baltimore's three major museums -- the Museum of Art, the Walters Art Gallery and the American Visionary Art Museum -- are all closed on Mondays.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | August 14, 1993
Artshowcase, an art gallery at 336 N. Charles St. devoted to showing the works of Maryland artists, will close on Aug. 28, at the end of its current show. J. E. Dockery, who operated the gallery on Charles Street since June 1991, said yesterday that he will continue acting as an agent for Maryland artists to sell from their studios.Artshowcase first opened at the Baltimore Design Center at North and Howard streets in 1990 and moved to Charles Street the following year. In the three years the gallery was open, Mr. Dockery said, he sold $100,000 worth of art. "That isn't enough to cover the nut, being the overhead for a first-class gallery on Charles Street," he said.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
With packing boxes and invoices everywhere, Bob Bealle's studio hardly resembles the place where he created the oil painting that graces this year's Federal Duck Stamp. "It looks like a factory. I don't have a place for my easel," said Bealle, a Waldorf farmer and former taxidermist. "I don't have time to get too excited. I'm too tired." Then he laughs. When you've dreamed about something for nearly three decades and had your heart broken a half-dozen times, you're allowed to be a little giddy.
NEWS
June 21, 2010
The appeal of great works of art is timeless, but the great museums that house them must constantly keep up with the times. Museum directors know they can't let a leaky roof or a malfunctioning climate-control system spoil the pleasure visitors expect. Even the décor of the settings in which art is enjoyed — the colors on the walls, the shape of the galleries, the style of the picture frames — has to be updated periodically to keep pace with changing fashion and tastes. So news that the Baltimore Museum of Art, one of the stars in the city's cultural firmament, is embarking on an ambitious, $24 million expansion and renovation shows that museum director Doreen Bolger remains committed to the mission she announced upon her arrival in 1998: expanding the museum's audience, making its offerings more accessible to visitors and, above all, maintaining its reputation as a world-class venue for exhibitions and scholarly research.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
Joseph Sheppard has painted a president, sculpted a pope, written books on art and shown his work across the U.S. and Europe. But a new art gallery that opens Tuesday marks perhaps the greatest achievement of all for the Maryland-born artist: It will be the first time that a permanent gallery has opened in the state to house the works of a single living artist. "I think it's my best work," the 79-year-old Sheppard says. "If this happens at all, the artist is usually dead. This is quite unique."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 2, 2010
June Sensinger, who owned a Towson antique jewelry business, died of progressive supranuclear palsy March 19 at her Homeland home. She was 66. Born Evelyn June Smith in Bloomfield, Ky., she earned a bachelor of arts degree at Murray State University in 1966. She taught art at Berea College in Berea, Ky., and, after moving to Baltimore nearly 40 years ago, worked in the Baltimore City and Howard County school systems. Mrs. Sensinger graduated from the Gemological Institute of America and had worked in jewelry sales and appraisals at A.H. Fetting & Co. in Towson, Dahne & Weinstein, and Heirloom Jewels in the Village of Cross Keys.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | March 16, 2009
Doris Patz, a musician and arts activist who assembled a statewide collection for the University of Maryland, College Park and endowed a scholarship there, died of respiratory failure March 8 at her Pikesville home. She was 96. "She was the muse who allowed the arts to soar at the University of Maryland," said William E. "Brit" Kirwan, chancellor of the University System of Maryland. "When she had an idea and made up her mind to do something, she was unstoppable. She was a remarkable person who worked out of the limelight to make a difference in a lot of lives."
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | November 12, 2006
What makes a birthday party fun? Free food, drink and fun, for starters. That's exactly how Maryland Art Place celebrated its 25th anniversary. Instead of holding its annual fundraising shindig, MAP's board decided to give a party and invite its supporters to enjoy the evening. On the house. Scores of MAP fans - like attorney Zelig Robinson and interior designer Linda Robinson, developer Patrick Turner, architect/interior designer Patrick Sutton, PR maven Edie Brown, orthodontist Karl Pick and fitness expert Marilyn Pick - met and mingled in the Power Plant Live gallery.
NEWS
September 22, 1998
Football fans littering carelessly, purposely in city 0) neighborhoodI was gratified to see your report on the amount of trash found in our neighborhoods after the recent football game at the new stadium. As a 10-year resident of Washington Village, I've grown accustomed to a certain amount of cleanup after games, although the amount left by baseball fans pales into insignificance.What you neglected to mention in your report was that some of the trash was not merely strewn, but systematically placed.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 27, 2001
Maryland Art Place, Baltimore's premier independent nonprofit art gallery, celebrates its reopening tonight with a gala reception in its new $600,000 exhibition space at the Inner Harbor. MAP had taken a six-month hiatus to accommodate a move from its old quarters in West Baltimore. The new exhibition space, at 34 Market Place, is in the former Brokerage, a complex of restaurants, nightclubs and other entertainment that is part of the newly renamed Power Plant Live. At approximately 4,200 square feet, MAP's new gallery is actually slightly smaller than its old digs on West Saratoga Street, but it occupies a single floor rather than two, and it has more wall space to hang exhibitions.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | July 16, 2005
RENE TREVINO maps the relationship of two lovers from a variety of angles, intimate and iconographic, sexual and symbolic, cultural and crass. He does it in a series of 100 images printed over hand-painted lacy wallpaper. He calls it The Propaganda Series, Part I. Geoff Grace puts up a tree, painted with liquid clay and whiskey, that soars to the 30-foot height of a wall. Entering the gallery you can't help but look up. How small you feel standing beside this towering tree whose leafy top maps a series of island nations.
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